OCR Interpretation


The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, March 28, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95047222/1919-03-28/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

: 1 1 f '
II II II II II f Bl FTTTf M. mm. wn ' - FHS
5QRAM
U8HE0 N THE BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OF THE BE StITaTe"
r
hTMETlIL
ID THAT PRELIMINARY
pEACE TREATY MAY BF SIGNED "5
BY APRIL 20; DRAFT OF M
LEAH NAI1S COVENANT
BOOST REM E8MER THAT 8ATAN 8TAVED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK HIS HOME TOWM
LAKELAND, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1919
No. 124
MAY SOON BE
PUBLISHED
Bson To Insist
Jn Monroe Doctrine
Being Included
In Final Draft
Leers of the states in
he executive council, to
IE INCREASED FROM TWO TO
'HREE
(By Associated Press.)
'aria. March 23. Hopes were ex
issed last night in peace conferencs
cles that a preliminary peace
taty may be signed by April 20.
To Soon to Publish Draft
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, March 23. The pub-
latton of the amended draft of the
ague of Nations' covenant within a
days with a provision safeguard-
e ine Monroe aoctrtne among tne
ur clauses. Is expected by the ad
Inlstration officials here as the re-
of informal advices received to
from the members of the Ameri
delegation at Paris. No official
formation has been received here
ncerning the failure of the League
(amission to Include the Monroe
ctrine amendment in the covenant
lent the drafting committee yes-
pay. Officials expressed entire
Infldence, however, that Wilson will
Islst upon such provision being in
final draft when it is passed upon
Jr the council of ten or by the peace
inference in plenary session.
L!
IBERAL
TERMS
NEW
VICHY
LOAN
mm
(By Associated Press.)
Washington. March 23. Terras of
payment of the new Victory loan, an
nounced today, are the most liberal
ever offered by a government. De
ferred payments may be extended ov
er a period of six months from May
10 to Novembebr 11.
Royal Highlander
Band To Be
Brought Here .
By Boy Scouts
The Boy Scouts under the direc
tion of Scout Master Filbert, have se
cured the Royal Scotch Highlander
Band, now at St. Petersburg, and
this splendid musical organization
will give two concerts on Thursday,
April 10th. the first at 3:30 o'clock,
and the second at 8:00 in th9 even
ing. The concerts will be given from
the band stand in the Park and will
be free, though the Boy Scouts will
ask to be allowed to tag auditors e.t
25 cents a tag. In this way it 1?
hoped that a nice sum may be raised,
forty per cent of which will go to
the Boy Scouts.
Features of the concert will be
ff ,iA$M) .
' rf
V!Tr '' Jr ;
To Increase Membership
(By Associated Press.)
Paris. March 28. Membership of
m Bfntfia In tha araftntlva nnrr!1 nf
! League of Nations, Reuters say
understands, will be Increased from
m to three, the third member prol-
being a labor representative.
Reject Military Amendment
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, March 28. It was reported
't night that the amendment to the
league of Nations' covenant provid
es for & permanent military and
ral staff for the League had been
ejected.
Lentne Asks Recognition of U. 8.
Paris, March 28. A rumor enr
ent last night was that the Un!t9d
Slates had received a note from Pre
fer Lenine and War Minister Trot
ll7 of the Russian Soviet govern
t, asking recognition for that
torernment. says Marcel Hutin In the
Echo De Paris today. Hutln says he
"cannot say that President Wilson is
Inclined to give the request favor
"le consideration.
fmer Premier" Death Exaggerated
(By Associated Press
London. March 28. Count Karolyt,
former Hungarian premier, vancusl
Ported assassinated or Imprisoned,
enjoying complete liberty In Buda-t-as
are other members of the gov
niment who were compelled to re-
when the Soviet uprising oc
Ted. according to a Hun,jarlan
ireles8 received here.
Create Council of Ministers
(By Associated Press.)
pis. March 28. A council of for-
"8" ministers and foreign secretaries
Great Britain, the United tSate-.
nce and Italy, has been created to
Tr simultaneously with the pre
!er and President Wilson but on
"erent branches f the creat tech-
,,cal questions involved in the peare
lement. Jftnnn vs tint irfren a
"'tentative because its deletion . started.
Include it. foreign i.Mtr. 1" "arce,y Btartea-
th slneine of Bobble Brollier,
Scotch tenor; Manuel Ylngllng. trom
bene solo, formerlv of. Theodore
Thomas' orchestra; Sergeant Turner
Nearing- cornet soloist; Happy Kent
xvlonhone soloist, and other famous
ntrformers. under the directorship 0'
llov D. Smith.
This band has been engaged by the
,- Rf Petersbure to furnUh
concerts for the past two seasons,
and has been more than satisfactory,
ifa concerts will undoubtedly please
And we are sure all will be anxiot'e
to be tagged for the benefit of the Boy
Scouts.
Florida annually produces 18.000.-
non nllon of milk. This state .
tetter adapted to dairying than is any
-rther state in the nnlo"
Florida's sea coast is
... rinrMa. with home-grown
IPO w
'on
More than JM Ppn
(By Associated Press.)
London. March 28. Premier Le
nine has sent a wireless to the Hun
Harlan government urging it to send
in army against Vienna, according to
i Budapest dispatch received at Ber
lin, and forwarded here. Lenlno
promised to advance one hundrel
thousand kronens to finance the pro
ject.
BARACA-PHILATHEA
' VICTORY CONVENTION
The seventh annual session of the
Florida Baraca-Philathea Union will
convene at Lake City, Fla., April 11,
12 and 13.
All Baraca and Phllathea classes in
the state are urged to be represented
at this convention. A splendid pro
?ram is being arranged for the occa
sion, including soul-stlrring music-
eloquent addresses and a good tlmo
socially for the young people who
attend. Among the leading speakers
on the program will bo Miss Henrlet
ta Heron, of New York, who is one of
the vice-presidents of the National
Union.
All the classes of the state are re-
UNCOVERED
PLRSONS
ROYALIST CONSPIWCr
;21
SHOT
Mill
(By Associated Pres.)
Stockholm, March 28. An alleged
Royalist conspiracy has been uncov
ered at Penza, in eastern European
Russia, according to the Russian
newspaper Krasnayra.Gaette. Twenty-one
persons were shot by the Bol
shevikl. The alleged leader was Su
kotlne. former marshall of the Rus
sian nobility and local commissary
under the Bolsheviki regime. Suko
tine was executed.
quested to send the names of al! Ba
racas or Philatheas who have beon
serving their country during the war
just closed, to the secretary, as plans
are being made for a special service
on Saturday the 12th. In recognitlor
of all those who have served during
the war. whether at home or over
there, in the army, navy or the Y.
M. C. A.
Lake City Baracas and Philatheas
will entertain all delegates to Con
vention free. So come prepared to
enjoy the hospitality of these good
people and to help and be helped by
this convention.
Please don't fall to have your class
well represented at this our soventh
annual convention.
American Troops, By
Frtmpt Action, Nip In
Bud Russian Uprising
(By Associated Press.)
London, March. 23. Action by the
American troops In looking after
Russian prisoners in Germany Is be
lieved to have nipped in the bud an
important Bolsheviki plot, acccrdlng
to an Exchange Telegraph Berlin dis
patch dated Thursday. The Sparta
cans at aSndau. the message states,
had planned a bgi uprising Thursday,
intending to arm several thousand
Russians from the Ruhleden camp.
The Americans, however, rushed the
Russians aboard trains Weduesday
right and scattered them under
Americans throughout Germany.
THE FLORIDA POTATO CROP
Announcements of first shipment
of potatoes are beginning to appear
trom various sections of the state and
the condition of the potato crop is
being discussed by the state papers.
In the famous Hastings potato section
where the industry originated In
Florida, the first shipments were
made Tuesday. This section has al
most as large an acreage as other
years but some damage was done by
excessive rain during, the early part
of the month and It is believed tha
the crop will be short this year.
Fifteen years ago Florida was Im
porting practically all of Its potatoes
and even ten years ago there were
few raised In the state outside of the
Hastings section, but the past five
years has seen the industry extended
to nearly every county in the state
and this year there will be both
spring and fall crops of potatoes,
sufficient to supply home consump
tion and export probably a million
barrels. With good prices in sight
this should bring to the state approx
imately five million dollars, as the
prices will probably range from $4 to
$7 a barrel this year.
Last year Florida potatoes were a
drug on the market Because ot exmi- (
ing conditions In the north. In 1917
the potato crop of the entire country
was the largest In Its history and an
unusual quantity of potatoes were
placed In storage. At the beginning j
of the year the freight conditions
were so congested that the storage
potatoes could not be moved and as it
was an unusually late spring the old
potatoes carried over In fine conlition
and in the spring they were dumped
on the market in such quantities that
the price was very lew and the Flor
ida potatoes, raised at greattr ex
pense, could not be marketed orofit
Mv. The result was that Florida
potato growers lost money last year- J
The conditions thi3 year are mucn
more favorable for Florida growers
and they anticipate good profits. The
crop throughout the country last year
was not as large as the year before
and the quantity in Btorage was much
smaller than a year ago. Then, too,
it has been a very mild winter In the
north and the potatoes have not car
ried over well and will be soft and
in no wise to bo compared to the new
stock that will be shipped from Flor
ida during the next two months. All
this will be greatly in favor of our
growers, but it Is sincerely hoped
that they will not be inflamed with
their success this year and endeavor
to make another killing next year by
greatly increasing the acreage- They
should be warned by their bitter ex perience
last year.
It would seem to be wise for potato
growers to get away from the old
rule of putting all their eggs or po
tatoes In one basket and adopt the
plan of diversified farming In order
to avoid a serious loss if one crop
fails or an unforeseen condition aris
es as It did last year. Jacksonville
Times-Union.
MM
AND
Mm
rnvim
PICE TO BE
TRIED BY HIGH
GERMAN COURT
(By Associated Press.)
ParlB, March 28. Former Emperot
Wllhelm and the former Crown
Prince will be among those tried by a
high court, which the German Na
tional Assembly will create, Paris
newspapers say.
CAPI. STEITZ HAS
CLEMENCEAU GIVEN WAR
CROSS BY OLD 80LDIER
(By Associated Press-)
Paris, March 27. Premier Clem
enceau was opening his mail this
morning, hurriedly as is his custom,
merely glancing at some letters, mak
ing short annotations on others, in a
fair way to dispose of his courier in
the usual few minutes. Suddenly, up
on opening a somewhat soiled ant'
cheap envelope, the contents fell U
the floor with a metallic sound..
The Premier picked them up, reart
the letter slowly, then read It again,
and then sat there staring at the
paper with tears filling his eyes in
eplte of his efforts to suppress them.
The letter read:
"They have not given you the wan
cross; here is mine. It has only two
stars while you deserve two palms
but it is the best I can offer; here
it Is." It was signed: "An old poi-1,.-
" 'T
And the "grand old man" of France
who with dry eyes had looked upon
the horrors of two wars, picked up
the little rusty piece of metal, the rib
bon of which Is soiled by the rain of
the trenches or bespattered with the
blood of Its former owner, and wept
"It might have been given to me
by the president of the republic or By
a marshal of France with great
romp at the Invalides. Coming from
fh's humble "pollu" I shall treasure
It forever," he said.
IN HIS PRISONER
OF WAR CAMP
The work ot Captain Steitz as Com
mander of a Prisoner of War camp in
France Is told very interestingly in
the last issue of "Let's Go," a small
paper issued from Hill 772. which
says:
The m7t- R- P. rightfully boasts of
one of the most comfortable Prisonci
of War enclosures in the A. E. F.
Where Heinle and his custodians, the
doughboy, once did a squad's ea:t and
marked time in a sea of mud, there
is now most every convenience.
This transformation is due almost
entirely to the efforts of Capt. Wm.
Stietz. the present commanding offi
cer ot the enclosure. Before his mil
itary figure was noted among the oth
er officers of the camp, the enclosure
resembled other parts of Death Val
ley. The prisoners and doughboys
formed In mud, the fame of which
long ago has been woven into scng
and verse by every bard who lost n
hobnail in its depths. ' But Capt.
Stietz Is a firm believer In that adage,
"a man is a human being" an I
straightway the elimination of mud
and the personal welfare of his charg
es were under way upon his arrival.
Duckboards leading to all the bar
racks were constructed and a road
made of the sawdust and - shavings
from the wood-working department.
These improvements are in vogue ail
through each barracks of the enclos
ure. The baths next demanded his
attention. . The doughboys ai.d the
prisoners under Capt, Steitz at one
time back In the dim and distant past
used the brook as an implement of
combat with the cootie with more or
less success, mostly less, but now the
camp sports hot Bhowers with a heat
ed room in which to dress, and every
thing. A laundry is conducted in
connection with the bath house in
each enclosure; there are barber
shops, shoe shops, tailor shops, car
penter shops and a canteen at which
the prisoners exchange their pay
flips for the little accessories of life
not on the Issue book. They receive
two sous a day.
The mess halls have movable tables,
there is a stage erected at one end
and each Sunday night these are con
verted into theatres, in which the
talent of the enclosures burst forth
into comedy and tragedy. The shows
usually last from six to ten.
The prisoners' mess is made from
the menu which the doughboys de
vour, both being Identically the
same. The health of the enclosure
has been unusually good since
Heinle's arrival here, only eight
deaths being recorded from among
approximately 2,000 prisoners. But
tho prisoners have to watch their
step. In one of the enclosures there
Is a little red brick hoosgow and on?
caught violating any of the regula
tions is placed here In solitary con
finement. At present there are nv
prisoners arrested for small misde
meanors and they are sentenced t"
Mitary confinement on bread and
water for a certain number of days
depending on the extent of the
charge, being given half an hour each
morning and afternoon for exercise
Last week a prisoner of war escaped
from the Nevers enclosure. ws ap
prehended at Fours, and Is heifg held
In the local stockade pending an in
vestigation Into his case.
VIENNA IS
IHA1ENED
WITH EAflE
BECAUSE OF
R. STRIKE IN
HUNGARY
8TRIKE SPREADING AND MAY
LEAD TO THE ESTABLISHMENT
OF A SOVIET GOVT IN GERMAN
AUSTRIA (By Associated Press )
Vienna, March 28. The railroad
strike called here threatens to spread
Ihroughout the country. The strike
was called partly for higher wages
and partly on account of sympathy
with the Hungarian revolution. It it
feared this may lead to the establish
ment of a Soviet republic in German
Austria. As the result of the Inter
ruption of food trains botween Trlest
and Vienna, the latter city is threat
ened with a famine.
Communists Want to Control
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, March 28. Tho communists
elements in Austria are planning a
movement to gain control of the gov
ernment, the Matin correspondent at
The Hague says he learna from
Vionna.
DeSoto County: Another Texas cat
tleman has purchased 16,000 acres of
land in this county and Is now fenc
ing it preparatory to bringing in a
herd of cattle from Texas. To this
he will add some of tho best native
cows and breed up for hotter beef
points. Several growers will carry
on spraying demonstrations.
Oceola County: Great Interest
shown by citrus growers to combat
insect pests and dlseasos. Trees
heavy with bloom. Considerable
thrift noted. Cattlo beginning to pick
up. A ,40 per cent stand for to crop.
Many potato growers planting pota
to fields to corn, pease, and velvet
boans.
Wakulla County: Farmers buying
better machinery. One gans plow
cultivator and one hand power peanut
shellcr was placed during the past
week.
GOVERNOR EXTENDS
TIME FOR PAYMENT OF
TAXE3 THIRTY DAYS
Tallahassee, March 28. Covernor
Catls today issued the following proc
lamation to tho tax collectors ot the
state:
"Some time ago the governor of the
state issued to you gentlemen orders
that it would be necessary for you to
close your boolu on the first of April,
citing section 3C, common laws of
l.'loflda. and section 6597, laws of
1907, but since that time the whole
: . i a i e of Florida linn been deluged
with rain and large sums of money
running into the millions have been
lost on account of the destruction of
all kinds ofearly vegetables, truck
and other products, entailing tremen
dous losa on every department of
this state. Therefore, I, as governor
of tho slate of Florida, hereby pro
claim that as the hand of God has
wrought this destrucllon and loss .to
the state, that the fcovernor of Flori
da will extend the time for 'each and
every tax collector within the state
v.hciein hi' may close his books with
in Ihr- pnlod of thirty days, or Until
the first of May, and assure you that
1 will take no summary action against
you for not doing so. For a hand
greater than ours hath thrown but
s.tato far back In the loss of much
p.'onni ty.
"Therefore, this proclamation is is
sued for your instruction and for your
advice.
' In testimony whereof I havo here
unto set my hand a'id caused the
great S"al of 'In state of Florida to
bo affixed at Tallahassee, the rapitol,
this tin f'Vh lny of Marn. A. P. 1919.
"SIDNEY J. CATTS. Covernor.
"By the Governor Atlas' :
"CLAY CR.WVFOnT),
"Secretary of State."
h ' '
jr.-
!
i
''I
'"
, " ,1' . '
u ?' -
;l
t
i j
i V
r '?

xml | txt