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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, June 25, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95047222/1919-06-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Lakelan
Evening Telegram
PUBLISHED IN THE BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OF THE BEST 8TATE
VOLUME TlH.
BOOST REMEMBER THAT 8ATAN STAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK .HIS HOME TOWN
No.' 00
LAKELAND, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 19W
ALLIES WILL 51 ULTIMA
111 GERMAN
IBM
MUCH
I! IF
fffilGIS
FURTHER DELAYED
ACTION
DEMOBILIZATION
TO BE CARRIED
OUT
RAPIDLY
EXPECTED
TREATY
WILL BE SIGNED
F
RIDAY OR SATURDAY
JfO WORD RECEIVED AS TO PEE.
SONNE! OF GERMAN DELEGA
TION AND ACTION IS DE
MANDED (By Associated Press.)
Paris, June 25. If the heads ot the
Allied powers in Paris donot hear
from Weimar soon regarding the Ger
man delegation for the signing the
treaty, an ultimatum will be sent to
the German government, according to
Reuters. The ultimatum will demand
the appointment of plenipotentiaries
within a certain number of hours.
To Sign Friday or Saturday
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, June 25. The treaty Is to ba
Signed Friday or Saturday, it is be
lieved The day is not definitely
fxed; The conference secretariat is
without knowledge of the personnel
, of the new German delegation.'
Generals Threatened t Qn!t
(By Associated Press.)
Berlin, June 25. Accounts written
for Berlin papers by correspondents
at Weimar, telling ot events preced
ing the decision of the German gov
ernment to sign the treaty, show
there was a threat by generals and
officers of volunteer troops to quit if
the treaty was signed without reser
vation.
Russians Occunpjr Petorhof f
(By Associated Proas V
Helsingfors, June 25,-The Russian
Volunteer White Guards have occu
pied Petorhof, nineteen miles from
Petrograd, according to reports re.
ceived here.
Polncalre to Visit Brussels
(By Associated Press )
Brussels.' June 25-President Poln-
care will visit Brussels July 21, which !
Is Belgium's national fete day will be
accompanied by Marshals Joflre. Roch
and Petaln a a review of the Belgian
army. .
No Action Taken
Washington, June 25. -After two
hours' discussion of the resolution of
' Senator Fall to declare a state ot
peace with Germany, the committee
adjourned without action.
MILK SHORTAGE IN
1 GREATER BERLIN
Berlin, June 25. Authorities of
Greater Berlin entrusted with the dis
tribution of fats and milk declare, In
a communication to the Imperial Food
Minister, that Berlin is now receiv.
ing only 200,000 quarts of milk daily,
which 133 quarts less than the city
had a year ago. This, it is said, is
sufficient only for children and the
sick. The minimum required for the
needs of those entitled to milk is
about to collaps, says the authorities,
who accuse the Food Ministry of fail
ing to take proper measures to relieve
the situation.
Ill FRANCE AFTER
: TREATY SIGNED
(By Associated Press.) 1
Paris, June 25. It is reported the
French army demobilization will be
carried out with all possible speed
after the treaty is signed.
PURCHASE AND
STORAGE CONTRACTS
(By Associated Press-)
Washington., June 25. "Purchase
and storage' contracts outstanding
June 1 .aggregated 1107,000,000
against more than the bill when hos
tilities ceased. According to the War
Department's - report of contracts
liquidated, more than half was settled
without cost to the government. The
estimated liquidation of war contracts
saved more than a blllio ndollars.
CLAIMS
BODIES
OF
CATS
AND
DOGS
FOUND IN PRESERVING
PLANTS IN HAMBURG
(By Associated Press )
Copenhagen, June 25. There was
serious rioting at Hamburg Monday
and Tuesday. Mobs attacked' preserv
ing factories, alleging bodies of dogs
and cats were found In them.
APPROPRIATION BILL
T
MAY
PASS
A
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, June 25. All commit
tee amendments to the army appro-
Inriatinn hill were disposed of last
, r
tight. The Readers predicted its pass
age before adjournment today.
CL
EMENCEAU
MAY
NOT
RESIGt
IS
AS SOON AS
FIRST BELIEVED
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, June 25. A "statement made
by Premier Clemenceau in the Cham
ber of Deputies yesterday concerning
the probable date for the general
elections was interpreted by a num
ber of newspapers as meaning the
Premier will not retire shortly as has
been reported.
ITALIAN SCULrTOR
WINS $25,000 PRIZE
i .
(By Associated Press.)
Havana, June 25. Aldo Gamba,
an Italian sculptor last night was
awarded first prize $25,000 by a
commission appointed to select a
model for a monument in memory of
General Maximo Gonier.. Gution
Borglum, an American, was awarded
third prize.
WINNIPEG'S STRIK
STIES
, VICTORIA
E CALLED OFF:
. r
AT VANCOUVER All
DC flCC TflMflDDnill
UL UN II
A.
I
JI1IUIIIIUII
INT
ALCOHOL
FOR INDUSTRIAL
PURPOSES
(By Associated Press.)
Washington,"' June 25. Representa
tives of medicine and perfumery man
afacturies urged the Senate Judiciary
sub-commltee today to revise the ten
ttttive prohibition enforcement legis
lation so as to insura supplies of al
cohol for industrial purposes.
POLICE GIVE PROTECTION
AND PRODUCE MOVES
(By Associated Press )
New York, June 25. With police
guards thrown around the Washing
ton market and a convoy formed of
mounted patrolmen for truck loads of
vegetables leaving warehouses,1 the
first appreciable movement of produce
was begun since the strike ot market
teamsters, chauffeurs and porters on
onday.
FIRST LETTER SENT
ACROSS ATLANTIC BY AIR
PLANE CONCERNED W. S. S.
IT WAS "SOME BREAD"
wmroi ARMY COOKS SI!-
" CURED OUT OF TALCUM
New York, June 25.-Lleut. Col.
John Sv Plunner, recently chief of
the Domestic Distribution Division
the Supply Department of the Army,
speaking last night at a dinner of
the Purchasing Agents' Association in
the Builders' .Exchange, No. 34 West
33d street, told of emergencies that
existed In France during the war
which the Dubiic did not know. He
cited, as one, that 1,000,000 blankets
had been lost on a sunken ship and
Ud to be Replaced quickly. He re
called an Instance where the surgeons
had asked tor quick delivery of a
large quantity ot talcum powder. It
a ill's
NEW PERILS FOR ISSUERS
OF WORTHLESS CHECKS
(By Associated Press-)
Philadelphia, June 24. Issuers of
worthless checks will find new per
lis from now on in practicing that
method ot fraud.
A law has been placed upon th9
statute books ot Pennsylvania defi
Ing the Issuance of a worthless check
on & misdemeanor. Hereafter, under
ls provisions, not only will the issi
Ing of a "no account" check, or one
ot the kind which returns with the
inscription "not suff," be punishable,
but the new law says, "the mere factl
of making, drawing or delivering such
a check will be prima facie evidence
- a. A -
of intent to defraud," unless me
drawer makes good the amount of the
Check with interest within ten days
For the person who draws and ut
ttrs a worthless check for an amount
less than twenty dollars the penalty
n conviction is $100 fine or thirty
days' imprisonment, while the draw
er of a check for more than twenty
dollars the imprisonment Is two
years. .
The first letter ever sent across the
Atlantic by airplane was answered
today, when the postman delivered to
Harold Braddock, Director of the
Swings Division, of the Treasury De
partment, a communication from Sir
Robert Kindersley, K. B. E., Chair
man of the British National War
3avIngB Committee.
When Commander Read hopped off
at TrepaBseyfiay on the first success
ful trans-Atlantic flight in the naval
airplane NC 4, he carried with him
a letter from Mr. Braddock to Sir
Robert carrying the greetings of the
Savings Division of the United States
Treasury Department to those In
charge of the British Savings Stamp
campaign. This missive was safely
conveyed by the crew of the NC4 to
the Azores, to Portugal and to Eng
land and coupled in its greetings the
saving of time for which both nations
had been striving with the saving ot
money vigorously planned for by
each.
Sir Robert Kindersley in his reply
congratulated the Treasury Depart
ment on the results obtained in this
country .and expressed the hope that
th Thrift Campaign conducted by
the Treasury Department would have
a lasting effect on the character of
the American people. Sir Robert's
letter follows:
"I am writing to thank you for your
kind letter of greetings, dated April
23. I desire to convey to you the
See to it '.congratulations of the National War
... A 11 . .1
some 15,000,000 people; and the sale
of these certificates continues at the
rate of about 2,000,000 pounds per
week, while we have every reason to
believe that the habit of saving has
been permanently adopted by millions
of our fellow countrymen.-Our great
aim in the future win be to establish
through the United Kingdom a strong
savings movement, worked on & vol.
untary basis for the purpose of safe.
guarding the interests of the small
investor and educating the future
generation in the habits of thrift
thereby strengthening their charac.
ter, building up their independence
creating opportunities for the mass
es."
(By Associated Press.)
Bolegna, June 25. Trial Alfred Coc
chi, charged with the murder ot Ruth
Cruger, has been interrupted indefi
nitely in order that the court may ex
amine American court records ot Mrs.
Cocchl's connection with the crime.
KING OF GREECE
IN FINANCIAL
T. E. L. Class
ij (a nnwer
.. . . v .... urfnm of knowl-, Savings Committee on the results al
tnatyou n- - d h the Bale 0,
edge that will enable you to b m
power for good. The T. E L, Class
a. iiiHt nan wii ii v - -
all women not. iucumu -
annrtar school to meei .u.
them Sunday morning at the First
'I very much hofle that the unlver.
;al educational campaign in connec-
ion with savings which your organ!
tnem ouuuu.j i .ion witu n"6 ;uu. v.Bu.
Baptist church. Lesson subject: Tne;:ation na8 carried on throughout the
f Christian Education. Eccles
10-10; Acts 22:3; H. Tim. 2:15; Ez
ra M0; John B:31; Gal. 6:6.
REPORTER.
United States may be lasting in its
effect on the character of the Amer
ican .people.
"In this country we have sold 325,-
000,000 pounds sterling in War Sav
ings Certificates, distributed among
cooks fell on it at once. Immediately . used. close! tor vehicles. Despite reports to the
. . . ".nttpn Col. Finnner Bam ' , tin wai.
there came complaints oi 1 - 9 KOvernment cancelleu ' contrary, u .uu,
flour- being used in the bread, and.cf the war, i rf seUhe thousands lt ha9 on hands,
ifiese continued until the surgeons I orders tor ,i ,
was sent to them in 100-pound .acks
nut vrhan it marnea tuc - .
MINING STOCK HELD
FOR IDENTIFICATION
(By Associated Press.)
Mexico City, June 25. When rep
resentatives of the famous Creel
family of Chihuahua recently ap
peared before the government offi
cials here with requests for informa
tion regarding the whereabouts of
mining, railway and other valuable
stock valued at c'ose to 2.000,000 pe
sos, they wer astonished to learn
mat tne stocK, as wen as aooui z.uuu,
000 pesos in paper money, was held
by the national treasury for,ldentlfl
cation of ownership and that it only
had been discovered a few monthl
ago.
According to published accounts
workmen, while cleaning out a spare
room in the building used by the fed
eral district government, fouud a
score of locked boxes which contained
the paper money and shares. Neither
the governor of the federal district,
General Alfredo Breceda, nor the
district court, after guarded Invest!
gatlons, could determine who owned
the treasure, so lt was turned over
ir trust to the national treasurer.
The theory is that, during the first
evolutionary troubles which resulted
in the downfall of Porflrlo Dias, the
boxes were sent from Chihuahua to a
private residence of the Creels here
and that, when the Zapatistas first
entered Mexico City, they were placed
in charge of the federal district gov
ernment.
The Creel representative stated that
a 'arge sum of metallic currency and
a valuable collection of jewels also
were being sought, tut of these easily
realizable riches, no trace has been
discovered . ' ,
L OF
IS
GOGHI
INTERRUPTED
E
FINITELY
SIX WEEKS
OF INDUSTRIAL
E
STRIK
ENDED
STRIKES ALSO ENDED AT CAL
GARY AND EDMONTON
(By Associated Press.)
Winnipeg, June 25. After nearly
six weeks of industrial strife, Winni
peg's sympathetic strike has been
called off. A similar 'announcement
came from Calgary and Edmonton,
where sympathetic walk-outs have
occurred. It 1b predicted that strikes
in Vancouver and lVctoria will be
called off,, today or tomorrow.
DIFFICULTIES
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, June 25. Former King Con
stantino of Greece, who has been liv
ing in Switzerland, is in financial -dif
ficulties, according to advices to Pa'ris
newspapers. It is added Constantino
is endeavoring t become reconciled
with the present government.
To Ylslt -V. S.
(By Associated Press.)
Brussels, June 25. Cardinal Hor
sier and General Leman, defender ot
Liege in 1914, will possibly accom
pany King Albert and Queen Eliza
beth when they visit the United
States.
13-YEAR-OLD GIRL ASTON. .
ISHES LONDON ART CRITICS
(By Associated Press.)
London, June 24. London art crit
ics express' astonishment over the
drawings now being 'exhibited at he
Leicester Galleries by a 13-year-old
girl, Pamela Bianco. She was bora la
England and now lives in Italy.
Musical child prodigies, It Is point
ed out, are not uncommon, but lt is
doubtful whether other Instances of
such precocity In drawing as Miss BI-,
anco's are on record. Already, the
critics say, she has a strongly
marked individuality which Is re- .
vealed in all her work. A 'arge
freize and two large decorative fe
male heads are among her pictures
on exhibit. Her power of design on
a large scale, is regarded as remark
able. Another picture of hers is ot
a children's peace celebration, and the
expression of the children's faces la
so good that the experts are amazed.
RHODES GRASS IS FINE CROP ,
Was First Introduced to This Country
By a Tampa Man
Washington, June 25. Florida has
been an examnle " for the United
States in the growing of Rhodes grass
which was introduced by Capt. Leroy
Rhodes, of Hie Tampa Police Depart
ment. from southern Africa in
and has proved of value for cultiva
tion in the warmer parts of the Uni
ted States, being growi more largely
In Florida and Texas than elsewhere.
In a special bulletin prepared by
S. M. Tracy agronomist in the office
of forage crop Investigations, and
made public by the Bureau of, Plant
Industry, U. S. Department of Agrl
culture. A small shipment was made
from Australia to Florida in 1904
The first distribution" of this grass
by the United States Department of
Agriculture was In 1904, and as very
little seed was then available, many
of the earlier distributions were of
roots, of which a" few were sent to
many farmers In Florida and along
the Gulf coast westward to Texas.
After a few years of trial the grass
showed such great' value for cultiva
tion in those regions that a consider
able quantity of the seed was pro
cured from Australia, and In 1912 dls.
trlbutlons were made in sufficient
bulk fa practical field plantings.
Since then the grass has acquired
mich a renutatlon that the seed is
now being handled commercially by
most southern seedsmen.
Regions Grass Is Best Adapted
Owing to its "inability to withstand
t t
M
m
i'i
w
y. c ?f
K f"
hj
'til
"'VIA
!
severe cold, Rhodes grass Is not
grown extensively north of Florida,
the Immediate. Gulf coast, and south.
em Texas. In Florida lt is grown
principally from St. Augustine south
ward along the east coast from
BrookBvllle southward along the west
coast and in a good part of the Ever
glades region.
In this country Rhodos grass does
best on a soil which is fairly moist..
although lt will live and, make some
growth during several ' months ot
drought. A deep, rich' loam is best
suited to Its growth, rnd it Is likely
to b6 unsatisfactory on dry, bard,
clay, or on dry sandy 'soils. It grows
vigorously on the wll-drained peaty
soils of Florida.
of Florida.
Rhodes grass beers drought well,
but is liable .to be wintei killed where
the temperature falls below 15 de.
grees F. N
For Its best growth tho grass needs
a soil which is fairly moist. It does
well in nearly all of Florida along the
Gulf coast westward, and under Irri
gation in southern Texas. - It does
better on a soil which is fairly heavy
than on' one which is very light and
sandy. .,;..... ... ., -
It makes a heavy yield of hay of
excellent quality, as the stems are
slender, tender, and very leafy. The
hay is cured easily and is relished by
all kinds of livestock.
In pastures under favorable , cir
cumstances Rhodes grass will support
about two steers per acre for 9 or 10
months and double that number dur
ing the more favorable partof the
season.
Seed is produced freely, although
most of that now used lrf this country
is imported from Australia on account
of the lack of machinery in this
country for thrashing and cleaning lt.
This bulletin mentions the soil pref.
erencs of this grass and gives the
methods of seeding and after-treatment
employed as well as handling
the hay and pasturing and seed saving.
ii
.ft si

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