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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, July 17, 1919, Image 1

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itiE LAKELAND
Evening
Tel
EGRAM
PUBLISHED ft THE BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OF THE BEST STATE
BOOST REMEMBER THAT 8ATAN 8TAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK HIS HOME TOWI-
TQLUME Tin.
LAKELAND, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1919.
No. 218
PRESIDENT RECEIVES REPUBLICANS
SENATORS TODAY, BEGINNING
DISCUSSION OF PEACE TREAT!
AND LEAGUE OF NATIONS
Silt
ASKS
PRES1DEN
COT
T
OF
PROTEST
MADE BY MEMBERS PEACE COM.
MISSION AGAINST SHANTUNG
PROVISION IN THE TEACE
TREATY
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July .17. President
Wilson today began conferences with
Republican senators for the discus
sion of the peace treaty and the
League of Nations' covenant. The
first caller was Senator McCumber,
supporter of the treaty andcovenant..
Senators Colt and Nelson have been
invited to call. They were expected
to accept the Invitation this afternoon.
Want Copy of Protest
a
((By Associated Press.)
Washington,' July 17. Without a
record vote or debate the Senate
adopted a resolution by Senator Bo
rah, asking the President to send to
the Senate "if not Incompatible with
public interests," a copy of the pro
test said to have been made by some
members of the American peace com
mission against the Shantung pro
vision In the peace treaty.
To Make Report
(By Associated Press.)
Rome, July 17. General Grahioli.
commander of the Italian forces at
Fiume, arrived today to personally re
port on the situation In that., city.
He will also explain the recent fric
tion between the French and Italian
elements In Flume.
Bols Are Concentrating
(By Associated Press.)
Tokio, July 17. The Bolshevik!
who are operating between Omsk and
Irkutsk appear to be concentrating
lu the neighborhood of Krasnoyarsk,
say advices received here, Their num
ber is estimated at five thousand.
Their main body frequently makes
1 night attacks on railway stations in
the vicinity.
Hun Prisoners of War
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July 17. Approxi
mately 27,000 Austrians and 3,000
Germans were prisoners of war in
Turkestan during May, according to
advices from the American consul
general at Stockholm. The British
authorities, It is said, have requested
the Soviet government of Turkestan
In January to release the prisoners,
offering to tfass them through the
British lines to their homes.
demption. The registering postmas
ter, upon receipt of the application
form and registered stamps, will for
ward a post office money order to the
redeeming stamp owner at the post
office of application ten days after
the date of application.
The regulation restraining the re
demption or registered stamps to the
registering post office has caused
some inconvenience in the past, and
it is expected that the new regulation
will result in a materail extension of
the use of the registration privilege.
Under this privilege the government
guarantees the 'stamp owners against
loss by theft, or destruction, and In
sures the payment of the value of
the stamps only to the bonaflde
owner.
DECID
E TODAY
TIE UP OF
S Bill
CHICAGO
NDUSCRY
REGISTERED W. S. S. MAY BE
REDEEMED AT ANY POSTOFFICE
Atlanta, Ga., July 17. The Sav
togs Division of the Treasury De
partment has announced the removal
I the restriction under which regis
tered War Savings Stamps could on
ly be redeemed at the post efflce,
nere they were' originally registered.
The Treasury Department has mae
rrangements with the post office de
partment providing for the redemp
tion of registered stamps at any post
office on the necessary ten days' no
tice. tender the present plans, applica
tion forms may be obtained at any
Tost office, which, after being filled
t in the presence of the postmaster,
H1 be forwarded to the registering
Post office. These forms will carry
information sufficient to conclusively
identify the registered stamps pre-.
seated and the owner applying lor re
MEN INVOLVED
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, July 17. Final action by
the building construction employes'
association on the proposed cessation
of all building industry in Chicago
was expected at a meeting today of
representatives of all contracting or
ganizations. Approximately 100,000
workers are involved.
6EN. PERSHING GUEST
OF KING I
OF E
QUEEN
NG LAN D
(By Associated Press.)
London, July 17. General Persh
ing, who is here to lead the American
troops in the Victory parade Satur
day, was the guest of the king and
queen at luncheon today.
SEYERAL THOUSAND
PERSONS SATED BY THE
LETTS FROM BOLSHEYIKI
(By Associated Press.)
Stockholm, July 17. -The lives of
several thousand persons of the mid
dlo classes at Riga were saved by the
Letts when they surprised the Bol
shevik! and captured that city on
May 19. These people had been held
as hostages by the Bolshevik!. The
suddenness with which the Lettish
yeomanry captured the city in a half
hour rush prevented the Bolshevik!
.irppin? them. Only In one
11U1U a
large central prison outside the city
where the Letts were ten minute
late did the Bolshevik! have time to
kill more than 100 educated persons.
This information has been brought
here by Hans Fraenckel. who has re
turned to Stockholm from an adven
x , rn to Riea in a motor boat
LUiuua
to rescue some of his friends. Fraen
ckel saved thirteen persons and
brought them with him to Stockholm.
He said the situation at Riga was
worse than any description could
picture. Famine had paralyzed ev-
,m. and the inhabitants looked
like shadows. Traces of the terror
that had converted Riga into a real
inferno were to he seen every wuc.c.
. pr lvine in the streets.
wprp most pessimistic
ine in;ui"v ' .
it. 11 till A innlced hopeless lor
ana i . ... .,
their Pillaged city. They nMed If
. afralnst the Bolshe-
11 CUU1U uv
Tikl unless the Allied powers gave
military support.
SHOT
SWEETHEART
AND THEN BLEW
OUT HIS BRAINS
(By Associated Press.)
Hojewell, Va., July 17 Jack Free
man, of New York, who for the past
year has been residing here this
morning shot and seriously woanded
Ruby Bennet, and then sent a bullet
through his own brain, dying in
stantly. The girl is likely to recov
er. It Is said jealousy was the motive.
STEAMER AGROUND OFF "
NEW JERSEY COAST
(By Associated Press.) -New
York, July 17. The steam
ship Scantic, operated by the United
States shipping board, is aground oft
the New Jersey coast, according to a
wireless message received at Sandy
Hook. The Scantic asked for assistance.
GENERAL STRIKE
INFI
ANGE MAY
BE GALLED
;i MONDAY
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, July 17. Measures an
nounced Wednesday by the govern
ment are not likely to settle the prob
lem of the high cost of living, ac
cording to a statement issued by the
executive committee of the Genera!
Larob Federation after a meeting last
night. The committee announced al
so that another meeting would be
held today to discuss the final plans
tor a general strike, proposed for
Monday.
Mexico City, July 17. The depart
ment of Foreign Relations has re
ceived word that the government of
Ian Salvador will send to Mexico
within a short time several aviators
who will study the air service there.
ORLANDO TAKES- SECOND GAME I TO
0, HUMPHRIES LET HIGHLANDERS
DOWN WITH ONE' SCRATCH HIT
(By Smiley.)
Well, boys, it was another great
game with the Caps out in front. The
old times Humphries was on the
mound for Orlando and he had those
Highlanders eating out of his hand.
Only three Highlanders reached
second and both of them got on by i
errors and not one being able to hit
a safe one in the outfield.
Wicker who beat out a bunt toward
first was the only local man credited
with a hit.
Humphries pitched a beautiful
game, using his head to a great ad
vantage, striking out six men and
keeping out of danger throughout the
game. Too much Humphries, thats
all.
Livingston was on the mound for
Lakeland, and, although he Bhowed
better form than heretofore, was hit
very freely, fast fielding holding the
Caps In check.
The boys certainly backed him up
in fine style and had it not been for
some fast fielding something surely
would have happened in the first inning.
Glunt, the first man up singled
through second, Stephens bqat out a
bunt, Glunt going to second. .
Jones also beat out an infield hit
filling the bases but Hunter sent a
hot one to St. Charles who fielded the
ball perfectlyi cutting off Glunt at the
plate and Campbell shooting the ball
to first, headed off Hunter.
Ball then grounded to St. Charles
and was an easy out. Ye Godi, that
certainly made us pull out our hand
kerchief and wipe the presperation
from our brow. After this scare,
things settled down to a fast game
and for a time it seemed that it
might take extra Innings to decide
the game, but in the eighth Inning
Stevens beat out an infield hit and
after Jonesha d been disposed of,
Hunter doubled to center, scoring
Stephens, which was the first and
winning run.
That one run looked mighty big for
the way Humphries was going chan
ces were very slim.
It was a great game and we all
will be out tomorrow to see another
one like it. Most likely big boy Ery
will be on the mound for Lakeland
and they will have to go some to beat
him.
Score by innings:
First Inning
Glunt, first man up, singled through
second; Stephens beat out a bunt that
Livy could not quite reach, Glunt go
ing to second; Jones also beat out an
Infield hit, filling the bases; Hunter
drove one to third, St. Charles cutting
down Glunt at the plate and Camp
bell's throw beating Hunter to first.
Ball out, Stv Charles to Meharg. 3
hits, no runs.
Lakeland RIva out, Stevens to
Jones ; Wicker out likewise ; St .
Charles safe on Glunt's error and
steals second a minute later; Ery was
an easy out, Humphries to Jones. No
hits; no runs. -
Second Inning
Orlando Windham out, Turner to
Meharg; Joyner singled over second;
Bebbinger filed to Turner; Humphries
filed to Turner, l.hif; no runs.
Lakeland Cohen filed to Joyner;
Campbell out, Glunt to Jones; Turner
safe on Jones' error; Turner steals
second; Meharg out, Glunt to Jones
No hits; no runs.
Third Inning
Orlando Glunt filed to Riva; Ste
phens out, Cohen to Meharg; Jonei
singled to right and steals second;
Hunter popped to Turner. 1 hit; no
runs.
Lakeland Livingston hit in front
of the plate and tagged out by Beb
binger; Riva lifted a high one to
catcher; Wicker out, Humphries to
Jones. No hits, no runs.
Fourth Inning
Orlando Ball walks; Windham
out, Livy to Meharg-Ball going to
Becohd; Joyner hit, to Livy, setting
Ball at third; Bebbinger struck out.
No hits; no runs.
Lakeland St. Charles called out
on strikes; Ery fanned; Cohen filed
to Joyner. No hits; no runs.
Fifth Inning
Orlando Humphries out, Cohen to
Meharg; Glunt out, St. Charles to
Meharg; Stephens singled to center;
Jones fouled to Campbell. I hit; no
runs .
Lakeland Campbell struck out;
Turner also struck out; Meharg safe
on Glunt's error; Livingston out,
Stephens to Jones. No hits; no runs.
Sixth Inning
Orlando Hunter struck out; Ball
out, Turner to Meharg; Windham out,
Cohen to Meharg. No hits; ao runs.
Lakeland Riva safe on Ball's muff.
Wicker beat out a bunt toward first;
St. Charles struck out; Ery fouled to
Jones; Cohen filed to Joyner. 1 hit;
no runs.
Seventh Inning
Orlando Joyner out, Turner to Me
arg; Bebbinger fanned; Humphries
gets a pass to first, steals second;
Glunt filed to Cohen. No hits; no
runs.
Lakeland Campbell lifted to Glunt
Turner grounded out to first; Meharg
struck out. No hits; no runs.
Eighth Inning
Orlando Stephens beat out an In
field hit; Jones out, Meharg to Co
hen, who covered first; Hunter dou
bled to center, scoring Stephen"; Ball
filed to Riva; Windham struck out. 2
hits, 1 run.
Lakeland Livy lined to Stephens;
Riva out, Glunt to Jones; Wicker filed
o Ball. No hits; no runs.
. ' Ninth Inning
Orlando filed to Wicker, Bebbmger
singled to left. Humphries grounded
out to Meharg, Bebbinger jjoicg to
second. Glunt filed to Wicker. 1 hit;
no runs.
Lakeland Carraway batting for St.
Charles, out, Glunt to Jones; Ery
called out on strikes; Cohen filed to
Ball ending a well-played game.
R H E
Orlando 000 000 0101 9 4
Lakeland 000 000 0000 1 1
Orlando AB R HPOAE
Glunt, ss 5 0 1 1 4 0
Stephens, 2b 4 1 2 1,3 0
Jones, lb "3 0 2 11 0 1
Hunter, If 4 0 2 3 I
Ball, 3b 3 0 0 2 0 0
Joyner, rt 4 0 1 1 0 0
Bebbinger. c 4 0 1 8 0 0
Humphries, p ...... 3 0 0 0 2-0
Totals 33 1 9 27 9 4
Lakeland AB R H PO A E
Riva. If 4 0 0 2 0 0
Wicker, cf 4 0 1 2 0 0
St. Charles. 3b .... 3 0 0 1 4 0
Ery. rf 4 0 0 0 0 0
Cohen. 2b 4 O 0 1 3 0
Campbell, c 3 0 0 6 1 0
Turner, ss 3 0 0 4 20
Mehare. lb 3 0 0 11 1 0
Livingston, p 3 0 0 0 2 1
Carraway 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 0 1 37 13 1
Batted for St. Charles In the
NEW TRIAL FOR
44 1. III. w:s
IS
ASKED
((By Associated Press.)
San. Francisco, July 17. New
trials for 44 Industrial Workers of
the World and others convicted in
Sacramento six months ago of vio
lating the federal espionage act are
sought through a writ of error which
was on file today in the district
court. The representations arc that
the trial was unfair and the verdict
of guilty unwarranted by the evi
dence. .
SEC. L
SIG
WILL
REACH
W
YORK
SATURDAY
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July 17. Under-Sec
retary Polk announced today that he
would leave tomorrow for New York
where he will confer with Secretary
Lansing before sailing for Paris to
take Lansing's place as head of the
American delegation. Lansing ex
pected to arrive in New York Saturday.
GOOD TRICES PREVAIL -
FOR CITRUS EXCHANGE
Reduction in Selling Charge
A reduction of four cents a box lu
the selling charge of the Florida Cit
rus Exchange was agreed upon at
the meeting of the board of directors
held yesterday afternoon. The lower
retain was felt to be justified in view
of the considerably larger volume of
fruit that the exchange will market
this season as compared with last
year, 'according to the carefully pre
pared estimates of the executive of
ficers based on the reports from the
various sub-exchanges.
In the discussion it was brought out
that the average prices secured for
its members by the Florida Citrus
Exchange in a typical auction mar
ket last season, were fifty-three cents
a box higher than the acverages of
all the other marketing agenclos, not
withstanding the fact that to the city
In question some of the latter shipped
a considerably larger proportion of
high grade fruit than does the ev
change. Other auction markets gen
erally show favorable results for the
growers affiliated with the exchange
and it Is believed that the average
prices they received in other than
auction points are just as much high
er, though . no official figures are
available except in the places which
have auctions.
The operations of the Growers'
Loan and Guaranty Company were
placed upon a much broader scale by
an action taken which will divert to
its use a considerable portion of the
surplus funds of the Florida Citrus
Exchange. The usefulness of the
former organization, working In a
limited way, has become so apparent
that the directors of the parent body
felt that It deserved this encourage
ment and extension of scope.
George A. Scott, the newly elected
manager, made his first formal ap-
nlnth.
Summary Left on bases, Orlando
9, Lakeland 5. Two base hit, Hunter.
First base on balls, off Livingston 2.
Struck out by Humphries 7, by Liv
ingston 3. Sacrifice hits, Stephens,
Jones, Windham, Wicker. Stolen base,
Humphries, , Jones. Turner. St.
Charles. Wild pitches, Livingston 1
Double plays, St. Charles to Camp
bell to Meharg. Time of game, 1:40.
Umpire, O'Steen. Attendance. 236..
FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
Club Won. Lost. Pet.
Sanford . 9 5 .643
Bradentown 8 5 .615
Orlando 7 7 .500
Tampa 7 7 .500
Lakeland 6 7 .462
Bartow 3 9 .250
nOW IT HAPPENED YESTERDAY
At Sanford 0; Bradentown 5.
At Lakeland 0; Orlando 1.
At Bartow 2; Tampa 0. ;
REORGANIZATION
OF NT'L CUARD
IN ALL STATES
OF UNION IS
EXPECTED SOON
PRESENT STRENGTH WILL BE
100,000 WITH MAXIMUM EXPAN
SION TO 401,000
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, July 17. The imme
diate reorganization of the National
Guard in States and territorial pos
sessions of the United States in ae-
v . - .
cord with plana approved by the war
department was looked for today by '
army officials here. The Guard Is
to be formed on the basis of sixteen 1
Divisions with a maximum expansion
to about 440,000 men, but the federal
funds available will permit of only
106(000 for the present.
(By Associated Press.) $
Rome, July 17. Zara, the Italian .
town In Dalmatla over which there
was much discussion in tha peace
conference, was represented by a
field and track team in the recent
athletic exhibition held in the Na
tional Stadium. Athletes from all ov
er Italy participated. ,In a grand pa-
rado of all the athletes in the stadium
before King Victor Emmanuel, Zara
had the place of honor and was re
ceived with tumultuous enthusiasm.
pearance before the board. In a brief
address, Mr. Scott made a splendid
impression and showed his complete
familiarity with all the problems of
citrus fruits. He was warmly greet-'
ed by the directors and his talk en
thusiastically received.
While the fiscal year of the ex-'
change docs not end until Sept. 1,
It is apparent that there will be a
considerable surplus at that time
from last season's operations. In ad
dition to the moneys voted for the use
of the Growers' Loan and ; Guaranty
Company, a refund direct to the local
associations through the sub-ex
changes with which they are affiliat
ed was decided upon.
Plans for the advertising of the
coming season were reported . to be
working out nicely. The new book
let and the store cards, cut-outs, etc.,
are well under way and will be ready
for distribution by the time fruit tee
gins to move. The board adopted a
recommendation of the advertising
committee providing for the concen
tration of the magazine campaign in
the months of November and Decem
ber and directing that the newspaper
advertising should follow.
A number of other matters of rou
tine nature "were discussed at length.
Resolutions were adopted urging ev
ery citrus growers' association to ad
here strictly to the provision of Its
charter which makes Oct. 1 tha last
date on which contracts can be made
with growers' for the handling of
their fruit.
A particularly gratifying feature of
the meeting was the receipt of a let
ter of appreciation from the Potato
Growers' Association of Hastings,
which this year marketed the prod
uct of Its membors through the ex
change, receiving higher prices for
their crops.
Dr. J. H. Ross, director from Polk
county, and president of the ex
change, was In the chair. C. E.
Steward, Jr.. secretary and business
manager, recorded the proceedings.
Other directors present were: A. G.
Hamlin .Volusia; Hv G. Putnam, In
dian River; C. E. ' McCormick, De
Soto; G. M. Wakelln, Lake; G. H.
Dugglns, Pinellas; P. C. Poters. Or
ange, and Edward Parkinson, Lee.
Sub-exchange managers: H. C. Gum
precht of Manatee and A. Ziegler of
DeSoto were in attendance. Promi
nent growers at tho meetings includ
ed J. W. Sample of Polk county; J.
H. Sadler of Orange county and Wil
liam Simpson of Lake county. Tam
pa Tribune.
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