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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, August 16, 1920, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95047222/1920-08-16/ed-1/seq-8/

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PAGE EIGHT '
II
EVENING TELEGRAM, LAKELAND, FLA., MONDAY, AUG. 16, 1920
(l n n o o
i liiyi vji u it mju u iyi u u u
the Theatre That Made the Dime Look Like a Quarter
Today Only
. -, - t
Elaine Hammerstein
IN
'The Shadow of
Rosalie Byrnes"
i'THE SHAlv .V ROSALIE BYRNES".- SELZNICK PICTURES
ADDED ATTRACTION
"Knights and Knighties"
A Big V. Comedy Special
10c
I
ALL THE TIME
THAT'S ALL
NO MORE NO LESS
Come Tonight, Get ti e
It's Yours at 9:30
IN
GOLD
COMING TOMORROW
ALICE LAKE
in-
ii
THE MISSFIT WIFE"
COMING WEDNESDAY
BEATRIX MICHELENA
-m-
(i
THE FLAME OF HELLGATE"
ON WEDNESDAY A BIG DOUBLE PROGRAM WATCH FOR SPECIAL
ANNOUNCEMENT
COMING THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
TOM MIX
-in
i i
THE TERROR
COMING SATURDAY
HARRY CAREY
-in
"HUMAN STUFF"
AMUSEMENTS
Leota
ALICE LAKE PLAIS
A SOCIAL OUTSIDER
;The Misfit WJfe," the new Metro
production announced for tomorrow
at the Auditorium theater, with Alice
Lake in the leading role, Is an adap
tation of the successful stage play,
The Outsider," by Julie Herne.
Miss Lake will be seen as Katie
Malloy, a laundress who loses her Job
through burning a hole in a silk shirt
and who sets out on a career as a
manicurist in the rough town of Par
is, wyo. mere sne meeis rewr
Crandall, a New Yorker, who has
gone West to take up Prohibition In
a serious way, but who becomes daily
more frivolous about It. Paris, Wy
oming, affordB little else In the way
of diversion.
Peter aids Katie in side-tracking
Shad Perkins, the offensive proprie
tor of the local hotel. ,And Katl9
takes Peter In hand'. She becomes
more interesting to him than drink
or cards. When he's thoroughly re
formed they are married.
His parents ask him to bring his
wife home, It means a strange-environment
for Katie, the New York
bouse, of footmen, tea-wagons and
Harvard accents, but she braves It
out. Only Peter's step-mother proves
unsympathetic. She resents Katie's
'lack of breeding;'' tells her she's a
'misfit," that she "never really could
belong. '
The little manicurist's dramatic as
sault upon the affections of her hus
band's family is then developed into a
winning fight, with the East capitu-1
lnting before the Western girl's
straightforward methods.
Alice Lake, whose memorable per
formances In "Should a Woman
Tell?" and "Shore Acres" place her
among the most brilliant of younger
screen actresses, will have a splendid
opportunity as Katie. Others in the
fast include Forrest Livingston as
B-.it McBride, a New York man-
a bout-town: Graham Pettie as Shad
Perkins," Edward Martindel as PUcr's
father, and Helen Pillsbury, Billy
rifittinear. Frederick Vroom,
Lorraine and Jim Blackwell.
The scenario was written by whs
Zellmer and A. P. Younger. The di
rector was Edwin Mortimer. A
Reeves is responsible for the photog
raphy and John Holden lor tne spe
cial are settings.
IS THE MOTION
PICTURE AN ART OB A
BUSINESS! LOCAL FANS
CAN DECIDE ,S00N
It would seem that the Industry it
self is going to answer the question
of whether the motion picture Is an
art or a business. Two factions, one
insisting that it is an art, in which
genius and artistry should be given
full sway In order to obtain the best
results, and the other which would
standardize the cost of production as
well as applying strict business
! methods to the other ramlflcation8 of
the industry, are battling now for su
premacy over this country.
1 Without analysis, it . would seem
'strange at first blush that it is the
! individual exhibitor or theater-owner
who is giving his support to the di
rector and actor in their stand that
' genius cannot be measured in dol-
' lars and cents, and that it is the big
producing concerns generally who
are lined up under tne Dusiness
standard. That the exhibitor is pretty
generally of the opinion that the cost
of production cannot be standardized
lr, authenticated by the announcement
of Associated First National Pictures,
the association of independent theat
er owners which stands for untram
melled art, that it now numbers near
ly six thousand members.
Indications are that Lakeland will
be- included in the list of territories
to be granted franchises in the new
organization. It will follow that the
exponents of the other idea will In
vate thts territory, also, if the one
faction does, and the motion picture
patrons of the city will be able to de
side for themselves as to whether the
' movies" require art and genius or
can b: ... ndardized in construction
like any mechanical device.
BRYANT WASHBURN A
"REGULAR FELLOW" No
MATTER HOW Painp.
"Too Much Johnson" Has J
'of the Chair" as Lj 1
Every director and star and m
tne leading piayers at the
uiuuuu yivkure HiUQlO naVo pK?""
wmcn to su Detween scenea
Bryant Washburn. Each nt
chairs is marked with the nam,
uie uwuer aim aiao sent mot.
"Private" or , "Keep Out" or ,
thing similar. During the filmta
"Too Much John ann .
, wmedj
ture at the Casino today Mr
..... m
Durn aeciaea to acquire a chair
Being an all-around "good
and having been without a chub
so long, tne star decided not to
stingy about it when it did cm.
had the following legend painted J
it: -uryant wasnburn's-ftbiic.
Everybody Welcome."
On the morning that his new
session arrived, Mr. Washkn
breezed into the studio, gaTe a
chair a paternal look, and sat dmr
A few minutes later he arose (or
scene. Lois Wilson, his leading m
an spying the chair and the inviui
found it a fine resting place and
mained an hour, while Mr. Washbm
finished with scene, paced the fa
When she departed, it was only
minutes before the star was n
moned also. When he returned, i
other actress was occupying the ik
and Bryan gallantly requested hen
stay. She did for an hour, n
next time the star was at ease, the o
cupant was Donald Crisp, the dirt
tor, who was reading 'script u
didn't even see him. And the (
Hmo It H7QO Wo ft In iV,n 1..J i )
dresser.
So it went the whole day.
Washburn , didn't get angry, just a I
tie puzzled. Finally he solved
difficulty. Lacking the heart to ?
one of those "Keep Off" signs on i
chair, he discarded it altogether,
he is again "chairless" and happy.
SHOP IN THE COOL nTlkkTP 17' C' 0RDEK TAKEN R
of muure a
M0RtllNC Style Shop tailor made aim
MEN'S WEAR THAT MEN WEAR
How About Another Pair of Oxfords?
At $10.96, $11.38, $12.20, $13.46, or $14.90
We needn't tell yen this is a wonderful opportunity. You will
know it the minute you examine, feel and try on these famous
oxfords.
The oxford illustrated here is of the famous 'Hanan' make.
They have established an enviable reputation because of their
wonderful quality and their correctness in style; they are ox
fords that give a finished weU-dressed appearance and may be
worn on any occasion.
Munsing
Weighs Only
A Few Ounces
ft
7
W I
HOT WEATHER COMFORT
Recommended by athletes and found to be the coolest,
comfortable union suit to wear on humid summer days. It
made of strongly woven nainsook that keeps the body cool
comfortable.
Full-length front opening; round neck,, armholes and k
knees neatly hemmed. Providing ample expansion and" ft
dom of movement.
CLOTHE55 THAT Muupn
ding lads want hi, k tad Th. , n-mindl. quick-acting. bus-
Lakeland's Best Clothes Shop

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