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The Palatka news and advertiser. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1908-19??, April 03, 1914, Image 7

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LOUNDS DRUG COMPANY
. '. Crescent City, Florida
GET INTO THE GAME EARLY !
NOW
is the time to get your garden seeds.
We have them. Everything fresh.
We buy only the best. Get our prices;
we will meet anyone else's prices for
first class stock.
; Headquarters for Pure Drugs
: ;1 and Chemicals.
Patent Medicines
"; i Stationery
Florida Souvenirs
LOUNDS DRUG CO.
, CRESCENT CITY, FLA.
GROVE H ALL
CRESCENT CITY'S
LEADING HOTEL.
It makes Its guests comfortable, and
. alfords pleasant porches and
lounging rooms.
GOOD FISHING AND HUNTING
close by. Orescent Olty Is an Ideal spot
in which to spend the Winter and Hprlmj
months. And Grove Hull Is the place to
stay. Kates on application to
W. C. NORTON, Proprietor
ORESCENT OITY, FLORIDA
REAL
ESTATE
CRESCENT CITY - FLORIDA
Crescent Hill lots
easy terms.
on
John Rafferty,
Contractor and Builder
CRESCENT CITY, FLA.
B.tinlita furnished and jobs of all
kinds finished eicpediously in Crescent
rth, .t Lake Como. Write me aDout
the work you want done.
:: WANTED.
Shippers of Freight of all kinds to
route their shipments by the Steamer
CRESCENT of the
Beach & Miller Line.
Shipments will receive the best of
care and prompt attention.
Steamer Crescent City leaves Cres
cent for Palatka. Jacksonville and way
porta at 6.30 ".m., on Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays.
Leaves Jacksonville on Mondays,
Wednesdays and r'ridays.
V;. E. T. CLARK,
Traffic Manager. Jacksonville. Fla.
Creaceat City Transfer Co'a.
Automobile al Boat Liue.
Aato meets all traias at Creaoeot City
Inaction Night trains by appointment.
H S. M. LaBREE, Manaer.
Crescent Citv, Florida.
A Bargain in
Bathroom
Outfits
We Install att work snd material
guaranteed, fro75up. Kalsominsng
and painting jobs taken anywhere an
Putnam County. Write me. '
J. L. WELSH
CRESCENT CITY - FLORIDA
C. E. GUTTERIDGE
L. L- B.
ATTORNEY
COUNSELLOR
: NOTARY PUBLIC
ETC
Collections, Stents. KeiU Estate. Sic.
CRESCENT CITY, FLA.
Office rear of Babel's Store.
.j. I. spora-cor,
Dentist.
Offlee at Residence on Prospect Street.
Crescent City, Florida.
HOT SPRINGS, ARKANSAS
Remedy Ends Constipation
Don't worry and don't take calomel.
Put vour slue-trish Liver in fine
condition and get rid of sick head
xha hillinusness and dizziness.
' Get a box of the famous HOT
SPRINGS LIVER BUTTONS of any
wnrthv druggist to-day, 25 cents.
- Gentle, blissful, wonderful workers
they surely "are; take one to-night
rVen the bowels from poisonous
waste and gas. You'll feel bright
and happy to-morrow.
There's nothing on earth so good
for Constipation and stubborn liver.
Hot Springs Liver Buttons, Hot
Sn.-ino-a Rheumatism Remedy and
Hot Springs Blood Remedy are sold
irj every drug store everywnere.
me u. a
v k . rur pat ATlfA TCKWS PAT.ATKA. LA.
mUAY, ArKlli 3, 1314
'' "" ' " ""' " ' f I -
Crescent City News
VWVVW WW w W WW
t Personal and Social,
t
Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Darby- made a
visit to Jacksonville this week.
C. L. Chamberlin was a visitor to
Palatka on Monday.
W. F. Glynn was a business visi
tor to Palatka this week.
Girard Alexander has been quite
ill this week.
Miss Marv Alice Eaton was a visi
tor to Palatka this week.
The tourists are rapidly fading
away, and just when the real Flori
da weather is beginning. ..
R. R. Kinard is traveling for a
well-known confectionery house of
Jacksonville.
The town election will take place
on the first Tuesday of the month.
One week from next luesday.
Georce Seaton is on a flying trip
to New York on business, and is ex
pected home tomorrow.
Mrs. A. B. Torrev has been indis
posed for the past two weeks from
an attack of lagrippe, but is improv
ing. Rev. G. E. Farr of the Baptist
church was absent from the city last
Sundav and as a consequence no
precahing service was held in that
church.
Mr. Bartlett. the elder, is not 91,
as some would like to make him; he
is still a young man at 81. But he
isn't worrying about age these days,
what he wants is good nsning.
Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Brown of Kear
ney, Missouri, who have been guests
at Miss Lucy Gautier's this winter,
left on Monday for home to the re
gret of a large circle of friends.
Mrs. Dr. Beggs, who was called to1
New York city a couple of weeks ago
by the death of a sister, is expected
home today or tomorow and will be
accompanied by her mother, who will
visit here a while.
Miss Sarah Jones the charming and
popular sister of Mrs. Dr. Hardie,
who is spending some weeks here on
a visit is quite pleased with Crescent
City. Miss Jones' home is at Hahira,
Go.
H. P. Sturdy of CharOey, Mass.,
surprised his parents last Sunday by
arriving here for a visit. Mr. Sturdy
visited Crescent City several years
ago and is well and pleasantly re
membered hy many of our people.
Mr. Purrington and family left on
Monday for their home in Massachu
setts. During their stay here this
winter Mr. Purrington has built a
cos.y winter home on N. Summit
street on the corner opposite the
Turner House.
The city tax books- "will close next
Monday and a number have overlook
ed the little matter rf paying their
town taxes. They hawa several days
yet. The books are at the store of
Paul 'C. Smith, town tax collector.
Get busy.
Four negro boys jiole R. C. 3Iid
dleton's auto out of W. C. Norton's
garage one night last week and took
a Joy ride. It was an expensive Tide,
as Mayor Graham lined them $15
each, which amount was paid. A
paddle dextrously laid across their
subsequent end is the only proper
punishment for uch .work.
Jdiss Bessie Neal has opened a
millinery tore in the east .-side of
the Chamberlin .store and is already
doing a nice business. Miss Neal
has had considerable experience in
the millinery line and has a natural
aptitude for the work. That she will
do a nice business is certain.
Mrs. J. R. Hill of Hendersonville,
N. C, who with Mr. Hill has been
spendine the winter at Daytona, came
over to Crescent city last weeK ior
a stay of some time and is a guest
at the Turner House. Mrs. Hill for
merly lived here and her old friends
are delighted to have her among us.
W. F. Glvnn and K. M. White went
to Tampa lart week, making the Strip
through the country in Mr. Glynn's
automobile. Thev report a very pleas
ant trip with fairly gosrd roads mr-st
of tine way. They :maiile stops ;at
Orlando, .Lakeland and other points sol
interest and returned home Sunday
night, having made tha day, from
a. tm. to : p. m. -trie trip irom
Lakeland here.
A card to the News from Fairburjr,:
III., announces the death at her home
in thai, place on the 24th of March,!
of Mrs. Victor t:. f ogle, me iuner-
al was from the family hbme on
Thursday, the 26tth. Mrs. Fogel and
her danVhter sptnt the winter here
a year go, and -were guests at the
Turner House. Tbey made many sin
cere rfiends. who will hear of the
death of Ihe mother with sincere sor
now.
Miss Addie Grace Waterman and
Miss Dunning of DeLand, soprano
nnH nisLniKLe. respectively, eave a
concert at . 1. A. man last rriaay
nitrht. whicfc was greatly enjoyed by
a fine audience. Miss Waterman, who
wa born and raised here, is a gradu
ate of the Stetson School of Music
and is considered one of the most ac
complished vwalists erar graduated
from that school. The young ladies
were the guests while sere oi Mrs.
A. B. Torrey.
Probably the largest fish caught
with hnW and line in this section in
many a day was that brought in by
Mr. O. P. Cheatham of Atlanta, Ga.,
last week. Mr. Cheatham, who was
here on a visit to his aunt, Mrs. . a
Cheatham, went out to Lake Marga
ret one day last week and caught this
fish which weitrhed exactly 12
TinnnHa? it. was weighed in the pres
cnn of several citizens, who follow
ed Mr. Cheatham down the street-,
tn spd the enormous nsri weignea.
Mr. Cheatham also caught another
which weighed 6 3-4 pounds.
Tho evangelical churches united in
a union service at? the Methodist
Episcopal church last Sunday night,
onH thAt edifice was crowded. A re
vival service with the preaching by
Rev. W. W. McCord of Georgia, is
in full swing and much good is be
ing accomplished through the ener
getic preaching of this able evange
list. Anyway, the people are turn
ing out4o the services as they hava
not in a long time, and people can
not spend hours in worship without
getting good. It was not decided
whether or not the services would
continue longer than the present
week, but that will depend on the
encouragement given the preacher.
S. S. Braddock was among the vis
itors to Palatka this week.
Rev. J. H. Hunsberger had business
calling him to Palatka on Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. P. DeWolf were
among the visitors to raiatKa mis
week.
Dr. G. C. Hardie and his sister-in-
law. Miss Sarah Jones, visited Palat
ka on Tuesday, making the trip down
by boat.
The Florida Grower should read
the story of Crescent City's prosperi
ty as told by the financial showing
of the Bank of Crescent City. Its
deposits of some $115,000 in a little
community like this speaks some
volumns for the prosperity of the
town.
The new Episcopal rectory is near
ly completed and ready for occupancy
This cozy bungalow was designed by
Audlev Eaton of this place and is a
monument to his skill as a designer
of cozy and roomy homes. Rev. Dr.
Taylor, the rector of the church, it
is understood, will leave for the north
in May, but will likely return early in
the coining fall, when he will occupy
the new rectory.
The secretary of the Ladies' Aid
Society of the Presbyterian church
writes: "The Ladies' Aid Society of
the Presbyterian church will meet
at the home of Mrs. K. Borson on
Monday, April 6th, at 3p. m., in.
stead of on Wednesday as hereto
fore. The ladies will please bring the
aprons for the taster sale. Mem
bers are urged to be present, and all
ladies of the congregation are cor
dially invited",
Fire destroyed the home of E. B,
Newsom at mid-day one day last
week, and while Mr. Newsom was in
a neighboring field at work. He was
attracted by the roar of the flames
and saw his home was being destroy'
ed. Every thing was lost. Mr. New
som is not in good health, and the
loss comes hard on him, as there was
no insurance. Mr. Hunter circulat
ed a subscription paper and enough
was raised to start the unfortunate
man oh the way to comfort again.
The Crescent City Tennis Club Is
planning a very pleasing entertain
ment for April 14th, when a short
comedy entitled "The Kleptomaniac, '
will be given at V. I. A. Hall by the
Misses Abijean Miller, Josephine Dar
ling, Helen Tillinghast, Grace Cash,
Myra Gutteridge, Crill Burton and
Lynda Payson-. In addition to this
clever little play there will be sev
eral vaudeville specialties guaran
teed to amuse the audinece, and the
whole performance will be followed
by a dance. All the seats will be
reserved tor DO cents each, to De on
sale at C. H. Preston's store on Sat
urday, April 11th. The proceeds are
to build a new tennis court which,
owing to the increasing popularity of
this sport in urescent city, is sore
ly neded. April 14th is supposed to
be a beautiful moonlight night, so
the promoters are expecting a large
delegation from Palatka and San Ma
teo, as well as people trom the sur
rounding towns. Remember the date.
From a Former Pastor.
The editor of the News has receiv
ed a pleasant letter from his old
friend, Rev. Dr. C. V. Waugh, former
pastor of the Baptist church, and
who is kindly, remembered by all citi
zens of the place. Dr. Waugh tells
of his desire to see all his old friends
here, but of his inability to visit us
because of pressing duties as an in
structor in the Jacksonville Y. M. C.
A. That he thinks-of us however is
evident from the following verses
which speak of those memories:
WE SAID "GOOD BYE."
Pomona came rough winds to tame,
Sweet Spring-time to bring near,
Bidding her wake her cup to fill
To drink to Summer's cheer.
We left a scene of beautiful green
And nectar ladened air
To speed away to homeland far
To loves and friends so dear.
We said "Good-bye" with deep drawn
sigh,
Hoping to meet again,
When winter's storms from leaden
sky
Might pour out snow and rain.
We've come again: we seek, in vain
For some we left behind;
We sadly learn they'll not return;
They've gone to a heavenly clime.
We said good by, with tear and sigh
To some so wan and pale;
We plainly saw the end was nigh,
And they'd ne'er more be hale.
Our days go by; they quickly fly
And make us what well be:
Oh! that each day we all may strive
Our loved ones gone, to see.
C V. WAUGH.
V. I. A. Offer Priiea.
The V. I. A. offers a prize of 110
to any white resident of the top'n
wkmse yard and abutting sidewalk
sh'ws greatest improvement in the
wav of beautifying with plants, grass,
etc, and in neatness during the next;
pio-hrt months, beeinnimr April 1st. l
A isecond prize of $5 is offered for!)
the econa greatest impruveroem.. ,
To the colored residents within the
town limits a first prize of $5 is off
ered for the neatest kept yard and
sidewalk; and a second prize of $2.50
for the .second neatest kept yard and
sidewalk, during the next eight
months, beginning April 1st.
Officers of the V. 1. A., by Teason
of their office, are debarred from this
contest.
For further information and sug
gestions in regard to this matter,
please see or communicate with Miss
Bessie A. Williams, Civics vice-president,
V. I. A.
n fcstate In the Moon.
After; the Franco-German war, in
which Cntnllle Flammnrion. the fa
mous astronomer, fought as a captain,
he settled down to his astronomical la
bors in Paris and later founded an ob
Kprvatorv at Juvisy specially to Btudy
the planets. On the occasion of bis
scientific Jubilee he was presented with
a silver medal depicting him standing
on a cloud, flanked on one side by the
ninnet Mars and on the other by his
Juvisy observatory. A region on the I
moon has been named after him. but j
In whispering this fact to an Inter- j
viewer M. Flammarlon hoped It would t
not be published. "The budget com- j
mission," he added humorously, "may
want to tax It as being landed prop
erty," Westminster Gazette.
SIEGES OF PERONNE.
They Won For the Town the Cross of
tho Legion of Honor.
The town of Pennine, not far from
Amiens, hns hud the distinction of be
ing decorated with the Legion of Hon
or and can place the cross so much
sought ufter by every Frenchman in
its eout of arm and on its seal.
Peronne has two memorable sieges
to Its credit, the first in l."3C and the
other during the Frnuco-Prtissian war.
During the siege of lo3(! Estournel,
governor of the town, held out for
more than a month against the Comte
de Nassau, lieutenant of the Emperor
Chiuies V. At the end o that time
Nassau, who had failed In three as
saults, gave up the siege.
The siege of Pennine during the war
of "soixante-dix" was one of the blood
iest in history. The Prussians sur
rounded it on Nov. 30. 1S70, and the
town held out until Jan. 0, when with
half the town in flames, no means of
fighting the fire, nut to mention the
lack of food and drinking water, it
capitulated.
The fire was so Intense thnt the bells
in the church towers were melted and
the stacked silver pieces in the bank
were turned Into ingots. Six hundred
and seventy houses were destroyed by
fire and Bhells. while 3,000 soldiers and
citizens were taken prisoners. New
York Sun.
FIRST IROQUOIS TREATY.
It Wat Made Between the Indian!
and English In 1664.
The first treaty between the English
and the Iroquois was made on Sept
24, 1004, and ushered In a friendship
that continued for more than a cen
tury. The Iroqnols hud been alternate
ly nt war and peace ror sixty years,
and the English found their dusky al
lies valuable in the war with the
French for Norttu American suprem
ucy.
The treaty with the Iroquois was one
of the first official nets of the English
governor, who earlier in the same
month had taken over the Dutch pos
sessions and changed the name of New
Amsterdam to New York and that of
Fort Orange to Albany. In 1003 and
again three years later the French in
vaded the Ironuois country, and the
redskins lost half of their warriors.
In 1713 the French gnve up all claim
to the Iroquois, and peace reigned for
a time, but In 1755 the warriors joined
the English In the war for the conquest
of Canada.
When the American Revolution broke
out the Iroquois adhered to the crown
At the conclusion of the war most of
the Iroquois took refuge in Canada.
Philadelphia Ledger.
Open to Conviction.
No rock was ever more firmly fixed
than were Mrs. Mauser's opinions, but
she considered herself of an extremely
pliable disposition, with a mind open
to conviction on all Bides.
"It's the strangest thing to me the
way the rest of the family talk as if
I were set in my views," she said one
day to her nephew William's bride,
with whom she had been laboring on
the subject of calling cards for more
than an hour. "It seems to me you're
sort of taking the Bame tone," she con
tinued, looking sharply at the young
womnu, "and I don't want you to.
There isn't anybody in this world
that's readier to be convinced she's in
the wrong than 1 am by people who
know more than I. All they've got be
fore 'em ever Is to prove to me that
they do know more than I, and I tell
you, my dear, there hasn't one of 'em
ever been able to iu this family'."
Youth's Companion. ,
Catching a Bride.
Among certain Siberians the bride
groom is not permitted to have a wife
until he can catch her. But they do
not give him a fair race in the open.
The bride, surrounded by her female
friends, awaits him in a big tent. As
soon as she sees him she runs off.
He follows like Ilippomenes nfter Ata
lantn. Rut Instead of obstacles being
thrown in the way of the bride they
are thrown across the path of the
bridegroom. The pursuing groom falls
over old women, chairs, tables, etones
and fishing rods or ts tripped up by
rones. Onlv when it Is feared he
mleht cire up and ulk and go away
without the fleeting lady is he permit
ted to overtake her. Then as she falls
Into his outstretched. arms it may be
Imagined she utters some equivalent
of "This Is o sudden!"
To have a fine healthy complexion
the liver must be active, the bowels
regular and the blood pure. All this
is brought about by using HEEBINE.
It thoroughly scours the liver, stom
ach and bowels, puts the body in fine
condition and restores that dear, pink
and white complexion so much de."
sired by ladies. Price 50c Sold by
Ackerman-Stewart Drug Co.
Didn't Miss a Coss.
Old lady locking contentedly out of
window in railroad train. Interest of
pjisFeugern excited by ringing nf what
suunds like nil electric bell. Old lady
caSmly opens up grip and shuts off an
alarm clock which had begun to ring.
Takes liottle of medicine from pocket
and .drinks spoonful. Iteadjusts clock,
closes grip and again looks out of win
dow, remarking casually to her neigh
bor: -Best little reminder that I'know
of. I iiave to take my medicine every
two hours, so I carry thnt alarm clock
witb roe. the alnrra set so that it will
ring wfcen medicine time comes
around." New York Tribune.
VV iH j m ! WHUIS !
WE HAVE TOO MANY. THE BEST ONE HORSE WAGON IN FLORIDA
WORTH $42.00 while they last we WILL SELL AT $34.00
Tlie C- EE. .restora. Coro.par1.37-. descent City, Fla.
Florida East Coast Railway company jMagier System;
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207-209!
K1SSIMMKE VALLEY
BHANCH
3.50PM lv Titunville ft
4.45PM Lv .Maytown Lv
5.20PM Lv Ciem-va fj
5.40PM Lv Chulwta "
5.50PM Lv Lake Pickett An
6.00PM Lv HitMo r
6 15PM Lv Pocataw r
6.30PM Lv Wewahotee ir
6 53PM lv Salofka r
7.10PM lv Toliojikee fc-
8.30PM r Kenansville Lv
BIG CATS AND CATNIP.
Leopard and Tiger Fairly Reveled In
the Odorous Plant.
Some one at the Washington zoolog
ical park obtained the permission of
the authorities to try the effect of cut
nip on the animals there. So far us
known catnip does not grow in the
native homes of these minimis, and
this was the first time they hud ever
smelled it.
The scent of the plant filled the j
whole place, and as soon us It reached
the parrots' corner the two gaudily at
tired macaws set up n note that told
fearfully on the nerves of all and
made for that side of their cage, pok
ing their beaks and claws through It.
When the catnip was brought near
them they became nearly frantic.
They were given some and devoured
It, Btem. leaf and blossom, with an
eagerness that equnled the noise of
their cries.
Next trial was made on an African
leopard. Before the keepers had reach
ed the front of the cage he had bound
ed from the shelf whereon he lay, ap
parently asleep, and stood expectant
A double handful of catnip was passed
through to the floor of the den.
Never was the prey of this spotted
African in his wild state pounced
upon more savagely or with such abso
lute enjoyment First the leopard ate
a mouthful of the stuff, then lay flat
on his back and wiggled through the
green mass until bis black spotted yel
low hide was filled with the odor, just
as you have sen a cat act when it re
ceives' some catnip.
Then he sat on a bunch of the cat
nip, caught a leaf laden stem up in
either paw and rubbed his cheeks,
chin. nose, eyes and head. He ate an
additional mouthful or two and then
jumped back to his shelf, where he
lay the rest of the afternoon, the very
picture of contentment
In one tiger's cage there is a very
young but full grown animal. When
this great, surly beast inhaled the first
sniff of the catnip he began to mew
like a kitten. Up to this time the soft
est note of his voice had been one
which put the roar of the big ma-ned
lion near him to shame.
Thnt vicious tiger fairly reveled in
the liberal allowance of the plant
which was thrust Into his cage. He
rolled about In it and played like 8
six-weeks-old kitten. He mewed and
purred, tossed it about, ate of it and.
after getting about as liberal a dose
as the leopard had. likewise jumped
to his shelf and blinked lazily the rest
of the day. New York Herald.
HIS MOST ANXIOUS MOMENT.
When Dewey Feared He Might Be
Branded aa a Coward.
Admiral Dewey tells in his autobi
ography the story of his most anxious
moment. It was when he was execu
tive officer of the warship Mississippi.
After passing the forts at New Orleans
his ship was about to sink under fire,
and the crew had to be taken off in
boats. There were not enough boats,
and the danger of n magazine explo
sion became no great that tire crews
showed Increasing hesitation in return
ing for another load. On a sudden Im
pulse Dewey jumped into one of the
boats to go after the rowers and com
pel them to return. He continues:
"Not until we were free of the ship
did 1 have second thought in realiza
tion of what I had done. I hail left
my ship in distress when It Is the rule
that the last man to leave her should
be the captain, and I as executive offi
cer should be next to the last.
"That was the most anxious moment
of my career. What if a shot should
sink the boat? What if a rifle bullet
sboiild get me? All the world would
my that I had been guilty of about as
craven an net as can be placed at the
door of an officer. This would not be
pleasant reading for my father up In
Vermont. He would no longer think
that I had done the Test reasonably
well. If the ship should blow up
while I was away and I should appear
on the reports as saved prohnbly peo
ple would smile over my explonation."
As It turned out, however, the maga
tlne did not explode, and Dewey's
presence was needed to bring the boat
crercs hack nnd save the men still on
the xtnU-tn? sbip.
,40PM
.30PM
i.37PMl
18PM
45PM
I9PMI
Bunnell
4 15PM 3.35PMI2.00V
, ... Orniond ....
, . . . Dnytons . .. ,
, . Port Grange . .
, , New Stnyrnm . .
, .. Titunville ...
Cocoa
, .. Rockledjre ...
, . . Kan Gallic . . .
. . . Melbourne . . .
, . . Sebastian . . .
, . Fort Pierce . . .
... Jensen
... Stuart
West Palm Beach
. , Palm Beach . .
llelray
. Ft. Fauderdale .
Dania
... Ilnllaudale ...
Miami
Miami
, . , Homestead . . ,
, . . .Long Key. . . ,
...Key West
r3 4.03PM 3.22PM11.48AMI1U.4I
(-1 3.10PMI
r3'3.30Plil 2.50PM!! 1.2nAMU0.10AMl 1.50AM1
y ??upvi 1.32PM in. liuMl 9.02AMll2.inAM
r3 1.5.3PM 12.53PM! 9.40AM)
rl 1.50PM 12.50PM 9.36AM
H 1.20PM 12.1NPM' 1
3 1.12PM 12.09PM! 8.58AM!
.. Li
.. Lv
.. Lv!
.. Lvl
.. Lv
.. L
9.30AMI
9.15AMI
8.00AMI 5.20AM
rJll.4UAM10.30AM 7.25AM! 6.00Am 8.30PM 11.20PM
B I 9.37AM 6.52AM1 5.13AMI 6.56PM10.20PM
H 0.24AMI 5.02AM! 6.44PM!l0.06PM
LV ' ' - . '
7.45AM lO.OOPM.lO.OOPMI
6.54AM:
6.07AM1
5.5-AM'
5.411AM'
5.20AM:
7.44AM
. . l; 7.00AM1
.. Lv;
lv'
Lv!
IvP.&O.SS.Co.Key West P.O.S.Co. M
rP.M),S;.,ro. Havana P.& I.SS.Co. Lv1
203
Daily
OUANliK CITY
BRANCH
210-206
, Ha. !:.
201
Daily
3.40PM 8.30AMI I
?1S!
12.4 PM
' J
ll.!
iitti
10.40AM
10.2UAM
10.1SAM
10.00AM
9.411AM
S.4..AM
Lv.
New Smyrna . .
. Lake Helen . . .
Orange City . ..
4.40PM! 10.30AM! Lv.
4.53PM! 11.05AM! Ar.
5.00PM' U.20M; Ar. .
Ora tfe CU.y.lc.
205
Daily
ENTF.HPHISE
BRANCH
8.00AM lv..
9.0.54M: lv.
10.15AM: If.
10.30AM: Ar .
TT. , Tituiville . . .
Maytown . . .
Enterprise . : .
.Enterprise .Innctio
ATLANTIC COAST LINE
4
STANDARD RAILROAD
Daily Trains
Daily No. 82
Lv. Jacksonville 8.00 a.m.
Ar. Savannah 12.25 p.m.
Ar. Charleston
4.50 p.m.
Ar. Richmond
Ar. Washington
Ar. Baltimore
Ar. W. Philadelphia
Ar. New York
5.05 a.m.
8.40 a.m.
10.00 a.m.
12.20 p.m.
. 2.31p.m.
Steel Pullman cars of the highest class operated on all trains.
Atlantic Coast Line new steel dining cars on trains 82, 86 and 88.
Local Sleeper to Savannah operated on train 80. For information
and reservations apply to your local agent, or write
A. iV. PRITOT
Division Passenger Agent,
138 W. Bay Street. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
,CKr.r.rTr.nnnnrtnnnBBBBeBBKKSasB3aaaasaatinrr.riViiitirrr.rrrt'n
W. A. MERRYDAY GO.
DEALERS IN
Crate Material of all
Kinds. Fruit and
Vegetable Wraps.
PALATKA
THE HANGMAN'S ROBE.
Dennis Didn't Like It, So He Sold It to
"Old Cain."
James Berry was not so well paid
for his services as his French con
frere. M. Antoiue Deibler. who draws
500 a year, while bis four assistants
have a similar amount to divide be
tween them. Sanson, the first execu
tioner to wield the guillotine, was
originally paid 1.520 a year, but when
executioners were appointed In each
department this was reduced to 800.
Before the revolution the legal tariff
in France was 2a shillings for a be
heading. 10s. 8d. for a burning at the
stake, and the same amount for a hang
ing, with allowances for the .erection
of a scaffold or the provision of fuel.
One of James Berry's predecessors,
for a brief period, donned a uniform
when at work. In 1785. according to
a contemporary chronicler, the sheriffs
of ILondon were "so pleased with the
excellent mode In which Edward Den
nis, their hangman, performed his
duties that they presented him with a
very .elegant official robe a khllaut, in
fact, as eastern potentates term a simi
lar garb of honor. Dennis found this
Inconvenient when nt work on the
scaffold and sold It to a well known
character of those days, 'Old Cain,'
who. having set up as a fortune teller,
wanted a robe to complete the cos
tume In which he received dupes."
London Chronicle.
Ayer's Pills
Headaches Biliousness
Constipation Indigestion
bold for 60 years.
Ask Your Doctor.
J. O. AyerOfi
PAGE 7.
Cennectioae mAt as
Key West, Via, with
P. ft O. S. 8. C. !
Hsvana, Cuba.
Connection Had at
Miami with P. ft O. B.
S. Co., lot Nmsm,
Bahama Iilaoda.
These Tims TaiLia
show the time si which
trains may be expected
te arrive at and depaii
fromtheieveralttatieBa
bat their arrival er de
parture at the threes
f itated is set guana
teed ac is this Cs
pany to be held rerpeai
lib! for ay delay e
eoy eoneeqneaees arie
ing therefrom.
SUBJECT TO
CHANGS WITHOUT
NOTICE
FOR COPY OP TM
LOCAL TIM
CARD
OR OTHER
INFORMATION
"SEE THR
TICKET AGENT"
9.20AM
8.10AM
7.10AM
7.0UAM
8.45AM
5.21AM
4.37AM
4.22AM
4.10AM
3.45AM
2.21AM
1.42AM
1.3SAM
3.43AM
11.031
2.53AM
2.36AM
2.20AW
8.24AMn.20PM
S.2UAM11.16PH
110.36PM;
7.40AM 10.26PMI
12.56AM
12.46AM
3.50AM: 5.08PM 8.30PM
8.15PM
4.1HW 7.2KPM
3.10PM 6.40PM
2.56PMI 6.30PM
2.42PM 6.21PM
1.10AM! 2.00PM
5.50PM
1.00AM
5.30PM
4.20PM
2.00PM
11.09MI
11.55PM
9.3SPM'
7.00PM
6.30PM
10.00AM .....
202
Daily
204
Daily
1 .05PM
12.10PM
11.55AM
7.30PM
6.20PM
5.25PM
5.15PM
11, MIAMI
206
Daily
1.30PM
12.40PM
11.34AM
1 1 .20AM
J. D. RAHNER
General Peieeage
Alat
St. Auaoenaa, Pl
OF THE SOUTH J
to ihe East
CM.
No. 86 , No. 88 No. 80
10 30 a.m. 3.00 p.m. 7.55 pm.
2 45 p.m. 7.00 p.m. 12.10 a.m
7.10 p.m. 11.10 p.m. 5.05 a.m
7.00 a.m. 9.20 p.m. 8.00 p.m
10.00 a.m. 12.40 p.m. 11.50 p.rr.
11.35 p.m. 1.55 p.m. 1.14 a.m.
2.04 p.m. 4.04 p.m. 3.40 a.m
4.13 p.m. 6.20 p.m. 6.00a.m
FLORIDA
Couldn't Afford to Run. ,
When Jacob M. Dickinson, formerly
secretary of war. as a member of the
Alaskan boundary tribunal was called
upon suddenly to mnke his argument
because Sir Edward Carson had con
cluded his remarks one day ahead of
time be began by telling a Btory: "So
far from feeling any sense of confi-.
dence." he said to the president of the
court "1 am in a position very deeply
to sympathize with the feeling of the
Confederate soldier who, when the bat
tle line was sweeping forward in the
Inst fearful charge at ChlckamHuga
and a rabbit Jumped up and ran
through to the rear, cried out: 'Run.
cottontail: If 1 did not have any more
character at stake than you have I
would run too.' "
Remembered It.
"What." said a teacher to a boy with
a slow memory, who had tried in vain
to tell the name of the schoolmaster;
"can't you remember your master's
name?"
"N-no. sir.-'
"My name is Brown, blockhead!"
"Yes. sir."
"Well, now see If you can repeat it
What Is my uunie?"
"Brown Blockhead, sir." Exchange.
Youth and Age.
Boys leave the farm perhaps be
cause they want to see more of the
world than 100 acres, though when
most meu are fifty years old they'd
be quite willing to trade the world
for 100 acres. St. Louis Globe-Democrat.
Reciprocity.
Talkative Barber (about to lather)
Do you mind shutting your mouth, sir?
Patient One No; do you? London
Opinion.
'I

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