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The Palatka news and advertiser. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1908-19??, September 24, 1915, Image 2

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PAGE NO. TWO.
THE PALATKA NEWS. PALATKA. FLA.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1915.
I
Jfc. k. -vl.-.l. ... .1..- , -
The American School Marm
A REFORM THAT HAS' $ . PUTNAM IS TO BE
OPEN SEASON FOR BUNK.
J ' COME TO STAY. 5K CONGRATULATED.
By Claude L'Engle.
BY FREDERICK J. HASKIN
Of all of Uncle Sam's children his switches and general ignorance, has
regular grade studies,
Teachers of Foreign Birth,
school marm niece does most to in
crease his wealth and influence in the
world. It has become as true of her
as of Queen Victoria that the sun nev
er sets upon her realm. She has fol
lowed the American flag to its far
thest outpost. The hot sun of the
Philippines and the icy winds of Al
aska have been powerless to daunt her
perseverance or courage. Wherever
she goes she carries civilization, sani-
kumnnitarinnism. as Well
i..iotr. nf the "three R's" and I
he Enelish language. She is a pi-1 migrant population thousands of chil
oneer of intrepid bravery, a mission
arv of devoted fervor and a credita
Die type oi American wuii"
Over 500,000 women are enrolled
u: tv, in the service of the ele
mentary public schools of the United
The Times-Union is not satisfied
While it cannot be said that there is w'th the position of the Teleeram on
any close season for bunk, this is the!tne question of restoring the old stat-
nothing in common with the woman, time of year when our large manu- us between the railroads
and the
teacher of today, who has been train- ftcturers of this universal American newspapers in which advertising was
wSfi2h iirJ fTt'v S'prt their lungs and their j changed for transportation so that
has finished a course of study that T ... . ... , , the editors and their fnmtitoo ,,) j
is broad and far-reaching. It covers imaginations for high speed perform- ride f""ors J?V " could
ethics and economics as well as the ance. By our large manufacturers I.T.-U. savs that if wnnM hf k.Vv'- J!l
...i. i . , Uu rr-i.". . - 1"'
mean muse who never snui down, ms leiegram to leave out some of
such as, Congressmen, promoters. . "ynmcate stories
- us ft v niiiciiip ictnvi.it, ,1 . u . .
.camera ui j-uieigu uirin. om.,. wngiconmcii, piuiuutcia, j - . - anu ut:ier put
Although supposedly a teacher of V".l751?eSJI. JL C''? I rad time schedules as aH vertiolfmlnf I
r- i-i. . i i Hiirnmnm e mKers newsnnnor man .. . o
r.egusn, ine American scnooimarm ".- ": LV' paid for in free rides th
ropists, and Chambers of
e. But now we will have wil
onof intrepid bravery, a, miss ton- ,on each ; year must W . n pushers. "arroused to perSal ac- Wi.Ut railad. facilities.
may have to be familiar with other MJ. governors millionaire phil- Lrviceofpr al behefit t fts
languages. In . cities having an im- nP', a" f " f .,Pm; ! era and forming them atMe IT
i.itivc. uub iiwn vc win nave Willi US fjma fkni.nk j. t
what may be called "seasonable bunk ...?Vu' .trer?y' V1?' Lakeland was not
.i... tivity. and largely increasing the out
where only English is spoken. So m,t- T,hese spasmodic but speedy lit
the schoolmarm may be only Ameri- le. workers include politicians, candi-
can by adoption, but she is invariably """ ",
E?SS
tne tngnsn speaKing c asses. "'"r, ""V , U1B does the fact that v,
The high salaries paid to many wo- flr wlt-h Webster's unabridged. (should publish the time aST1''?
mon toartiprs in A marina a ro inlino Une reason why bunk is so DlentifurtuI .. .e seneouies ot
by the large parties of American that.,t Prdtmn requires neither IgiSwt thta vSw ofh, T?'
schoolmarms who for years have lor bralns. .nor information. The ' ahoTnT,Mih0e T6' uTh
been swelling the ranks of European other reason that it requires no PnaPef, a" MP sh such sched-
tniirists. Th summer mUo cneioi menial exercise 10 listen to it or toi 7 ir .-.."""' "tiier
trains and hundreds of private cars It only requires a memory pubnsh the weather re Jr fBS the?
have been chartered by bodies of and a. me.dium of expression to get m 'iSlhJi rePorts. free and
jstatPR tm to women. : " . . v " i.n i unmv w Lneir reaaera
"ni most sutes have few cw and spent j & ?f course the transportation is no
winhto htif mow rt pvcrvwi eic 111- . - v.., .iut, - ui nit in rno fitront-n
Northwest of their own country. .ver snone Un. If you are a Con-jword to anv deeent
Kisauiaii vuu icttr uii a lew annul - . '
.4..,liT The srhnnlmarm
restricted to the lower grades sne
has taken her place in the highest ex
ecutive and university circles., one -
doing efficiently much of the work
that was done by men a few years
ago. Each year increases her num
bers, and despite her low averairf
earnings, the two highest public
school salaries paid in the United
That it is the desire of the people
of Florida to have a complete system
of hard-surfaced highways, preferably
brick, is quite evident from the result
of the special district bond election
held in Putnam county on Tuesday,
The election was carried by an over
whelming majority. The amount 10
be spent is $208,000, and if this mon
ey is wisely expended, the eastern
section of Putnam county will be able
within a couple of years to boast of
brick-paved highways leading to all
important communities. Palatka will
be the center from which these brick
roads will radiate to San Mateo, Hast
ings and Federal Point. There is al
so included on the program the pav
ing of the road to Rice Creek in the
direction of the Clay county line along
the western shore of the at. Johns.
The result of the election is pecu
liarly of interest to St. Johns county,
in that it means when the work in
Putnam is completed and the one-mile
stretch in St Johns from the present
brick highway in Hastings to the Put
nam county line is also finished, there
will be a continuous brick road from
the St Johns county line at Duval
right through to Palatka. This wil'
be a great benefit to Palatka, and
while that city is not directly on the
Dixie Highway as it runs at the pres-
. . : . i c . t i -A
il i,. . r ;cm nine imuugn junns, li, nevtr-
,;"!.uP"b J"st.as they I the less will attract a considerable
The argument is nlnnciMe k.,
valid. There should be no individious
class distinction in the .general
policies of our great transnortjitmn
t thev are everywhere in
vested with the sacred responsibility
of training men to meet their
civic duties. More than 60 per cent
of the school children of this country
leceived all their education from wo
men. In New York, 92 per cent of
the boys never come in contact with a
man teacher. Whatever principles
of manhood, patriotism and honor
they possess have been given them by
the women teachers of the lower
grades.
More Girls in High School.
The percentage of children in a
closely populated city who advance to
high school, or even complete the
grammar grades, is relatively small.
It is smaller for boys than it is for
girls. One reason for the increas
ing preponderance of women teach
ers is the larger number of girls who
remain in school long enough to re
ceive the qualifying education. It is
typical of American chivalry that
when1 a father is unable to educate all
of his children, he keeps his girls in
school. The bovs ko to work. An
But the schoolmarms are not quite
ortensive sense of 'ne
self-respecting
satisfied yet. They are still ag tat- i he development of Our Rivers and ;d bribes Z7 are DrlBes
ing for pay equal t that givene, Hta. Hd to X
Thousands of them resent the fact
Wealth,
If you are a real estate or tude
tpl nn man ,.n,. toll, h, ! 'UrPllUae
men tpurhprs is $
while for women if is $K4 si Their rear 1'uture, or
exnect to have thpse fiVures enmil el E.ver mis season
il ... -
that the averwe monthly salary for a , ,ra"f P00" you talk about for f ' " " '7 ,
7S 2) in th s cmmtvif i.icreaseu values oi Lana in ine tui .li. ',..:"(. , "
7 . ... ' Near Pntnro " nr '"The R,,rDt T,.. """gallon W-HlCn dOeS
The Biggest Trav- Le liM T r u-, I. d0eS not fcar
on" as the case e1'KhtJnd of, whlct no newspaper
b.ed snnn. The shnnlmprms a n may be. We all know these old relia- Ui..," ,r ",BU. out, never-
whole may not stand for woman suf- bles and the others like these in bunk !"'u,T?7. 'xls.a"u0t?1at,on- va?ue an"
frage, but their tendencies are strong- ar,n? power used by our bunk ar-of that g'XfJZ'F"
If the mo ,l iisis, tacn cnoosmg according to ris i ,, . . -.i""-""
St. Johns river. This, of course, is
only an incidental benefit. The great
est benefit that will come to Palatka
will be the patronage and the trade of
the farming communities. It is sife
to predict that with the eastern half
of Putnam possessed of brick high
ways, the west half will not be long
in following its example. St. Augus
tine Record.
IV in mat direction. It the one Hv , cat" iuwunk autumnis iu ns u. ,-, , , . ,---
strike for women workers proposed by taste, occupation, purpose or predilic- - UWt feel its w nV"
uuii. yc are utseu 10 mem ana we i,j . , . . "
would miss them if we heard or saw i"s h!s ""Partial aloofness from the
them no more. 1 . ne snouui be as
the suffragists takes place in New
1 ork city next month, over 50.000
schoolmarms will participate a con
dition which will turn nearly 250,000
children into the streets for a day.
When Schoolmarm Marries.
T,.t i :n..4. i :l . ' Lticneu irom it in nis ed tni-in ottj
uuni, lu uiuMiiiit; nuw easy It IS ) , V, 7 . "-'''-
put the bunk across let us take the e as .a. Juds,e on the bench a
case of the political forcaster who n,0" 1 s dcket- . ,.
talks or writes six months or a vevL blkewlfe- e,'e a'e editors and edi-
The schoolmarm has long been re- l',efl?re election day. Without the .a" al' ?' oth.enmf be,nff h.uman
,rle,l n. A ,.nmrriH ,k slightest know edge or conminctinn. ! lt ls, ""-Wless true that some of them
this old boy will rear back and' sav !l" ,ne c?mPeiK Power of
something like this: "While Green and " . pIu ea'iy lree, transportation
Brown have a strong following and ' "'' 'e. and t0 just that ex-
:a ..! '. ' .leiii t:ie iunction OI the nress t o
many 11111 ueut tUl Tlin). 'r- ,.....,.: r, .
"fttt.i, iui UUU1IC evil
White has
corrective
garded as an unmarried woman who
used the schoolroom as a stepping
stone to the marriage state, just as
men used it as a means to some
more favored Drofessinn snnh as me1
All .... , er Rl,l. !. 1JS 'VI
opposite course is likely to be pursued i'-'V" ki for Covert This nf ki t ' the force of the public senti
regard teaching as a life work, and we wil see or hear almost daily fromA, f n, m1JhtW e"nd: ,
still claim their woman's right to hap- "ow ,ulltil June- the purest bunk ,itB'tiJ af ?el1 a(ic!Pt th?
piness by marriage with the men of of all, as anyone can see by BivinK:teUdpt fS,?1?10
their choice. Domestic and social the matter a minutes thought. 'each Davs for whnt it ; " whl
conditions have so changed that it is' The,'e are more than fifty thousandth h.t mme tn tl f f Cld
now nnssih e fnr a nnm,m ,,. votes cast in tne Democratic nnmnrv '. v " cm
without giving up her work. these fifty thousand, not five thous
in Europe.,
The Nev York high schools gradu
ate five tirls for every three boys.
In Chiigo, two girls graduate for
each hfy. In Philapelphia the pro
portijjl is even greater, because of the
nveat commercial high school, exclu
sively for girls, which turns out year
ly 400 graduates. The Philadelphia
Board of Education established a
school of pedegogy for boys as a rival
to its magnificent normal school for
girls in the hope, that it would at
tract more young men to the teach
er's profession. It has not accom
plished this. Notwithstanding the
fact that the young pedagogues start
with a considerably higher salary than
the girls from the normal school, the
schoolmarms in the Quaker City are
still increasing and a few of them are
receiving salaries closely approaching
those paid to men.
The charm of infinite variety at
taches itself to the schoolmarm to a
greater degree than any other class
of women. As a whole, she is at
tractive, wholesome and wellbred.
The antiquated female of the old
fajhioned school, with her bunch of
First Talking BiachCne.
The recording of vibrations of n
membrane was Brst accomplished by
Leou Scott in ISTiT. by the invention of
what he' called a "plionautograpU."
This Is regarded Hs the precursor of
the modern phonograph. The actual re
production of sound was tlrst achieved
by Thomas Alva Edison In 1S70 ami
tlrst patented by him in 1ST", the pat
ent being dated In January of that
year. There bad been, of course, str
eral experiments anil Improvements
between. Tlio first method of recording
vibrations of a tuning foil; on the sur
face of a drum was discovered by
Thomas Young in 1S07. Alexander
Cinliaui Bell and S. Tiiinter patented
the griipliophono in ISSo. Eniile Ber
liner patented the gramophone in 18S7.
New York Times.
TWELVE-CENT COTTON &
IN GRASP OF FARMERS
.
Clarence Poe, who edits the Pro
gressive Farmer and who is one of
the best known agricultural experts
in the United States, is sure cotton
ought to bring twelve cents this fall.
He argues that if a seventeen million
bale crop sold last year at planting
time at ten cents that a ten million
. .i. i ij i
or a twelve million crop snouiu oe
worth all of twelve cents.
Mr. Poe thinks every farmer should
hold his cotton. He argues that the
crop is from three to five million bales
short of the actual needs of the world,
and that every single bale of this sea
son's crop will be consumed, in addi
tion to millions of bales from last
year's surplus.
The difference in price between ten-
cent cotton and twelve-cent cotton is
a matter of a quarter of a billion dol
lars to the farmers of the South, and
Mr. Poe is sure that his plan will
save that enormous sum to the farm
ers. He urges that cotton seed will
briner hieh prices, and that if the
farmers of the South will hold their
staple, the higher price for cotton is
certain.
That Quarter of a billion spells the .
difference between having enough to
live on and abounding prosperity, in
the opinion of Mr. Poe.
Escambia s small cotton croo saves.
the county from feeling any very di
rect effect from the fluctuations of
cotton, but the south is too closely
united in its financial interests for us
not to read with interesst the chance
the South has to make money on its
most valuable crop. lhe farmers
here would do well to heed Mr. Poe's
ai'vice until the market goes to twelve
cents or higher. Pensacola News.
Prayer For Davis Law.
Sunday, September 26th. has heen
set aside by the Anti-Saloon Leaguo
FARMER'S WIFE
TOO ILLTO WORK
A Weak, Nervous Sufferer
Restored to Health by Ly
dia E. Pinkham's Veg
etable Compound.
Kasota, Minn. "I am glad to say
that Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
('nmrtound has done
""v. '' 1 more for me than
tX 1 1"-' i ' i'l the' best physi-
cash has come to stay,
lution not an emotional reform bas-
Until comnai-ativelw W er. ard have, at this earlv dav. said how!, t,,c, . an.a. Propntey of
a woman forfeited her position by ,theJ wil1 vote for Governor or any ". ,tlme a"d ex-
marriage. She does so sUll in some other office. We can figure each "A SPj"?0'?"' work
cities, hut th s will not he th ,. candidate with a certain number ofi islm.
long. Court after court renders the '"ds who will vote for him, but
decision that the woman who wishes tnis number is small. The great
to marry need not relinquish the nro- 111383 f vters have not been heard
fessinn it vennivo! i.A..v... l from and will not. he heard from until
learn. ;the votes are counted. There is no (as a day of prayer in all the churches I
The heroism of the woman teacher wav on earth to n-rure how half the, in Florida for the mighty movement
is well established. In times of voters vote, unless you want tooi public sentiment in favor of the
danger she does not lose her head milke a f?uess, and your's is about as(strict enforcement of the Daviy law'
If fire bleaks out she will either save Kod as anther man's. as soon as it becomes effectiv;. I
the children or remain with them un- There are no "leading candidates"! Program for the Sunday -ervic!.
til death. A North Dakota school-,"1 a raee thats free for a11- where) 1. bermon by pastor or address
marm sheltered her scholars and kept every man has an equal chance, where .by some chosen prominent man, or
them safe and warm during a three- the PeoPle think for themselves and .men, on some phase of Law Enforce-'
day blizzard, to the joyful surprise of nlake UP tneir mivds after hearing ev- ment.
their parents who had mourned them erv man's claims and promises. There 2. Prayer for strong public senti
as lost. In the Hawaiian leper col- wl" l)e a leading candidate when the; ment to uphold the officers of the
cny an American schoolmarm is giv- count is Koing on, and all attempts law in the enforcement of the law!
ing her life to the instruction of the J0 ta,f nim before the inspector's tal- and to strengthen the Governor's
children of incurable lepers. '' ?heet gets the little black marks hands, if he is called upon to assist!
The American schoolmarm is not 0,1 il' are as futl,e as trying to scoop: in any way in the enforcement of the)
always a white woman. The uplift moo;,smne off a barn door with a crab.law.
of the colored people in this country 're ., ' 3- Announce a pre-arranged local :
owes much to the devotion of a few! T '"utrate further the ease with '"town meeting for the general pub
women, who obtained their own edu- wn'cn political bunk is dispensed, sup-lic, at which arrangements shall be
cation by tremendous effort, and de- p e snouiu up ana say: "some say j completed lor strict enforcement ol li-
voted
race.
Of T'inor Importance.
"Our little Jane is becoming a more
serious problem every day. I've hud to
iret three new school dresses for her
mid lengthen out two skirts nml buy a
netf school hat and school shoes and
no end of oilier things. She keeps me
busy most of the time."
"And how is she coming on In lier
studies?"
"Studies: .Mercy, I've had no time to
ask her!" St. Louis Post-Dispatih.
The Connection.
Hyker Why did you give up smok
ing? Pyker In order to marry a rich
widow. Hyker I full to see the con
nection. Pyker She refused to give up
her weeds unless I would give up mine.
It is simple enough. Loudon Tele-irmpli.
is
their lives to educating their that IIudson is the leading candidate
When the United States took lu' "";"".' " 1 a.v e is ivnott;
and as Karris I know Catts will come
up to the scratch and make the fur
fly " This would be bunk of the rank
est kind, but if somebody prints
quor laws (in dry counties) and the(
I)avis Law (in wet counties.)
The Anti-Saloon League urges the
churches through their ministers or
Geniue Recognized.
"It's a pity that Shakespeare
.lead, remarked the old playgoer.
"Yes," replied the modern manager.
"What a moving picture scenario l
could have writteu!" Washingt
Star.
Worth Their Weight in Cold.
"I have used Chamberlain's Table's
i- otherwise to carrv out this mwnil!lna "una mem to De just as repre
n- in , j :... : im..:j .. sented, a quick relief for headaches
and other somebodies read and repeat Sunday, September 2tith, because un-:dlz'y speils and. otner symptoms de
it, the foundation is laid for somejunited effort will stir up great inter- notl!)f. a torpid liver and a disordered
wise uoy to make a prediction of theiest and
; doing as loyal result next June, despHe the fact thtjrespect
island as man'v t!le race is vet "0U"S. the field widejment m
charge of the Philippine Islands hun
dreds of American women teachers
from the leading colleges in the coun
try went to establish the public school
system there. Now their services
t.iv: n:;ir iicciieu. iiei'Miise Tne rmrtf ' "niiv , uinvwu .i.v.b nm dui mm ki tin iiilci-i ..
i.: j i . , wise hnv tn muWe a nroHi,.t;n nf th t o ,i nth,,Dit a ...iii jiconuition oi tne digestive orirans.
MViliiiCU I lit 11 XK If" 1& wnO naVe taKeil . -K v..-.. un nuu cnuiiuiaaiu, anu n ill luiniuaiiu min ., U Ui , i
teacher's training are doino- as loval r.esult next June- despite the fact th-t (respect for the general law enforce-1 e.y a,,e,.wort their weight in go d,"
work on their native island as manv-the race ls yet youiP' the field wide (ment movement throughout the state.
of the best teachers in Continental .pen 10r a"ded starters, and fouri C. W. CROOKE,
in ins oi uie voiers nave tneir powerJ.
THE SQUEEZE PLAY.
1 1 Succese Hange on the Batter Hit
ting the Ball to the Ground.
TUi' squeeze play is one of the pretti
est in baseball when successful. When,
it tubs no piny makes u bull team look
uioic foolish. The play is best worked
n iili one out. a luuiicr uu third and a
iuu needed to either t.e or win the
KUine. .Many of the best base runners
when :i lioui to make lhe play create
lhe impressUm that there is no inten
tion of pulling it by taking only a fair
lead oil' I In- base and standing still.
The very imuuriit the pitcher starts
his uovcuiciit the man on third tears
for the iliiie.
If in any way the intention to use
ilic p.ay is tifipcd off or foreseen It is
uu easy matier for the catcher to
break il up by culling for a waste ball
Ihat is so wide of the plate that it is
impossible for lhe batter to bunt IL It
is uu easy mailer to touch the base
i-ii unci' out and make the team trying
lhe squeeze appear ridiculous. But a
siiei essl'ul completion of the play usu
ally puis the team in the field In the
air and makes them look equally fool
ish. , "
The squeeze pluy does not call for a
hard hitler or a good hitter, but It
does call for a man with a good eye, a
fellow who invariably hits the ball,
even though it may not go safe. If
lhe batsman limits the ball tn the air
an easy double play Is usually the re
sult, if he is able to keep the ball oa
lair ground there Is seldom a chance
to stop the run at the plate. It is not
necessary to have a fast man on third
to make this play, for most tif the play
depends on the ability of the batsman,
to keep the hull on the ground. Billy
Kvaus in St. Mcboiu-.
Luck.
Luck ls the main difference between
failure ami success. It rises like some
mysterious fairy from the chaos of
events and crowns its victors with no
apparently hopeless ignorance of Jus-1
the. t j
Luck must tie a woman; no maoi
cuuia ue so ticKie. so rantiistic In a
choice of favorites.
Luck, however, has one great virtue.
Although she will desert the gambler
as suddenly as she came to him. she
is likely to lie faithful to those of her
proteges who are the steadiest work
ers. She appears to be on the side of
the biggest battallons.-Life.
linited t:itoa
jiui minds nxed on such things as
Keeping Things Neat. !shoef for th ';ab5'- fuel for the kitch-
v i i l. , , i en stove, and bacon and grits for the
lou plant a rosebush bv vour door, -f.,mii,. .,m
aim iiioiiiiiit; Clones inree or lour
writes Miss Clara A. Drives. Elba.
N. Y. Obtainable everywhere.
Some people make a specialty of
condensing the milk of human kindness.
State Superintendent.
The Magic Valley.
a music of the morning
cian here. I was so
weak and nervous
that could not do
my work and suf
fered with pains low
down in my right
si.le for a year or
more. I took Lydia
L. Pinkham's Vege
r. now I feel like a
I believe there is
table C ompound,
dilferent person.
nothing- like Lydia E. Pinkham's Vege
table Compound for weak women and
young girls, and I would be glad if I
cmild influence anyone to try the medi
cine, for I know it will do all and much
more than it is claimed to do." Mrs.
Claka FltANKS, R. F. I). Xo. 1, Maple
crest Farm, Kasota, Minn.
Women who suffer from those dis
tressing ills peculiar to their sex should
be convinced of the ability of Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound tore
store their health by the many genuine
and truthful testimonials we are con-
sianuy puui.Mu.ig m u.c k.W". "i have trie,, mn5f nf v
If you have the slightest doubt cures and find that there is none that
that L.ydiu JCPinkliain's Vegetu- equal Chamberlain's Cough Remedy,
ltle Compound will Iielp you,wr4te i It has never failed to give me prompt
to Lydia K.PinkhamMedicineCo. ! relief," writes W. V. Harner, Mon.
(oiiIidential)Lynn,3Iasforal-pelier, Ind. When you have a cold
vice. Vour letter will be opened, give this remedy a trial and see for
read and answered by a woman, yourself what a splendid medicine it
and held in strict coniidence. js. Obtainable everywhere
you mow the lawn when whiskers
(green upon its Coiitenance are seen;
lyou take the dead cats to the dump,
and fix the fence and paint the pump,
:and trim the figtree and the vine, and
j make the doornob fairly shine. And
! neighbors who have gone to seed,
1 whose lots are grown to grass an:l
'weed, will soon or late .observe your
I game, and feel a burning sense of
'vi'iie. They'll say, "That fellow's
'place, so neat, is ouite the smoo'ih-.-'
;on the street; it makes ours look like
! also-rans, so we'll adopt that smart v's
: I bins, and prove to him that ot'ir
jays can well deserve the public
; praise." I've seen a neighborhood
that lay all ragired, c .e to brush and
bay, br;ice up and bloom to beat the
-band because some pilgrim, tools i:i
ihand, cleaned up his lawn and pruned
.his trees, and bought some flowers
and bumblebees. Thus good exani
I Pies spur the souls of men who've
crawled into their holes, content to let
-the whole world slide, the tail con
nected with the hide.
WALT MASON.
There's
r. - , , mat troes tniitinir soit v dv
r.e:i as wise ann solemn a man as .... , - . v
A. K. Tavlor sometimes finds himself en ? a"'ier the valley
.... . ..... Whore the h neenme never lie
yielding to the bunk pushing hi'.bit in
the rare intervals of rest between car
toons. Last Sunday we were discuss
ing the gasoline propelled tour of one
I-. A. Wood, who wants the people to,
petition the (lovenor to call an extra L. . . '.in,
legislative session to change the law Tx ls n0 a palnted v?"e
from fees to salaries for all our coun-r P,ctur,n a m'f ; , ,
ty ollici,ls-and without a minutes hlf beauty
warning Tavlor said that he wondered And agleam with nwthy'.t
if the county officials saw Wood first ? ,hls vaey' m'p,hty v",lle5'
would they cut Wood afterwards. S. ,V",er a wondrous sky,
you sei- the bunk habit is cat.-him- and h?re. the summer s never ended,
.A .U me oiu&mhiio nevei inc.
Where the blossoms never die
In the strange and wondrous valley
Where the summer wears its smile
While the other world. is shadowed
And is weary all the while.
u had
etter look out.
None Equal to Chamberlain's.
A Disturaing sound.
"There is no excuse for a man being
run down by a motorcar. All he has
to do is to keep bis wits about him."
"Of course.'' replied the recent victim,
in sarcastic tones. -There Is nothing
more conducive to rational thinking
than a loin! 'honk' heard unexpected
ly In one's rear." ISiriiiinghaiii Age-Herald.
'It is in that land of fancy
I Where the dreams of childhood roam;
'And in life forever after
.We delight to call it home
For we long for it and wonder
,When our struggles here shall cease
If we'll find it find the valley
Of the everlasting peace.
Baltimore hun.
To the Public.
Opened Her Eyei.
Clara Can it he. Ilolkv th-it vnn are
to marry .Mr. Smith after saying to me gratitude." writes Mrs. T. N. Wit
repeatedly that you could not endure erall, Gowanda, N. Y. When I beg:
taKHlir tnis nieuicuie i
him? Holly The truth 1s. Clara, dear,
that until I beard that bis aunt bad
died, leaving him a fortune, I was de
ceived In my own feelings toward Mm.
London Telegraph.
"I feel that I owe the manufactur
ers of Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera
and Diarrhoea Remedy a word of
With-
an
was in great
pain and feeling terribly sick, due to
an attacK oi summer complaint. Al
ter takine a dose of it I had not Ion?
to wait for relief as it benefitted me
almost immediately." Obtainable
everywhere.
Tl BIG BARGAINS
IN
BARGAIN NO. l.-tw b..,. so Mi ,ong, 14 ft beam
people, and h. all modern ,"d nHed"" PW"' C"n "'P
mile, per hour .nd draw, 3 1 2 f, sflend'd "'"'if- W'" make 9
excellent condiiion ; ju.t four yer, old. ' Worth VscOo" i" m"
money but will .ell for half cr $2500 and if f "ny man
,e.pon.ible par.ie.. Jusl the bna, , w.n TorT T
inland water.. ' Want lor Florida coa.t and
BARGAIN NO 2.
26 ft. Runabout Boat with
mil
e. per hour and
a .need of 1.1
in fine condition;
co.t $1500 but will .ell for $650,
Both of the b,ne boats will h-nr .e cUmt illsrection
anrl are km , hop.nicu I .... t. ., . 1-ci.iion
.. ,v . lmlc li(J Illruier Ufe f ,
further particulars address
For
A. D. STEVENS . Jacksonville, Fla.
Care of Merrill-Stevens Ship Building Company'
X,
X
1
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