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St. Johns herald and Apache news. [volume] (St. Johns, Apache Co., Ariz.) 1905-1917, January 10, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060582/1907-01-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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JOHNS HERALD
AND APACHE NEWS
ST. JOHNS, APACHE CO.. ARIZONA, JANUARY 10, 1907.
No: i 8
-5-.;.
r...,f ..,1 Air .L 1. JdLOgue
will leave Saturday for Phoenix,
-and will visit with friends at
several points along' till the
convening of the next session? of
the legislature.
District attorney Barth is over
'from Concho attending the
- Supervisors' ; sessions. He will
soon remove to the County seat
, with his family und make this
his permanent residence.
Joseph Udalh one of the newly
elected members of the Board of
Supervisors, is in town this week
and is busy with the affairs before
4 the Board. Mr. Udall starts in
-vell, and will' prove to be an
, excellent man for the position.
J. W. Armijo, the -hold-over
HiPinber ohlie Board of Super-
- visors from last year, was unani
mously elected Chairman of the
Board for the next two years.
He is looking well to the inter
ests of the Couiitv and will be
painstaking in- the matters
jibe fore Board.
Several gentlemen remarked
Vinf Hip SHOW -Ml. Uift wnue,
'fountains is much deeper at this
time than snow was there in
January 1906. This looks well
for farming and stock interests
iii tire Little Colorado Valley.
FEEL
WE
Of eur Ability to handle your Bank
ing Business to your entire Satisfaction.
We shall be glad of an Oppor
g tur ity to Talk with You.
THE APACHE COUNTY BANK & TRUST CO;
St. Johns, Arizona
CAPITAL, $30,000.
A bill has been introduced in
Congress for the loan of $1,000
000 for the use of the Jamestown
Exposition, which is to be held
in old Virginia next year, near
the spot where the Causasian race
first settled i on the North
American . Continent, three
centuries ago. Congress in
former years, has dealt generous
ly with the big expositions, that
celebrated events of far less
importance. The first settlement
on this soil is not only the great
est event of three centuries but,
next to the discovery, it is the
greatest in the world's history
for more than a thousand years.
Congress will only be voicing the
sentiment of the entire country,
when it makes this appropriation,
which will be returned in due
time.
London i agitated over the
question of what England will do
in case of war between the U. S.
and Japan. That's easy. Eng
land will stand around and give
advice to both sides.
A New Rochelle, N. Y. man
who was once kind to a rich
! nan in distress has just received
, $500,000. If there are any more
rich men lying around
distress we should like to
notified.
in
be
Campbell Method of Dry
Farming to Be Tried
in ElPaso Valley
The .first attempt at dry farm
ing, according to the theory
advanced by Campbell, to be tried
in El Paso county, will be made
next year by Paul-McCombs, who
owns land down the valley near
Belen.
4iI am enough convinced bv the
plausibility of the Campbell
theory to try it myself," declared
Mr. McCombs to a Herald
reporter. "By the process- ...of
plowing and harrowing they
claim the rpoisture may be kept
in the ground and prevented from
coming to the surface where it
evaporates.
"In the first place, about ten
inches of rainfall a year is all
that is claimed to be necessary.
If the annual" precipitation comes
during the fall, winter" and
spring seasons of the year the
moisture may be made to enter
the ground by a process of har
rowing and dragging. The
ground should be plowed in the
fall about ten inches deep then
harrowed with what they call the
disc harrow The surface is then
gone over several times with the
same harrow during the winter
and spring until the seed begins
to come above ground. This!
grinds up the earth into a very
tine dnst which shuts off the
capillary attraction. This stops
the rapid evaporation of the
moisture in the ground by keep-
insrit from coming to the surface.
The water which is thus heldderauce of the white race . in
under the surface supplies the
roots of the plants during the
time'of growth when but little
rain ismeeded.
'"The water of one year is thus
kept in the ground until the next
when it furnishes the plants
with the necessary moisture for
the growth and maturity.
"1 am going to see if the cot
ton plant will not Jast from one
year to the netft by the proper
care, and if it can be economical
ly demonstrated there will be a
great saving in the raising of
the product. By saving the
roots the plant can be started
growing in the spring with a
ínátured root system which will
naturally make the plantstronger
and more productive.
"If this method of dry farming
can be proved practical in all
parts -of the country where but
ten inches of rain falls a year,
-the value in the arid districts of Subscribe for the St. Johns Her,
4he country will increase to an -akUand Apache News.
alarming degree. Land that is
now selling at $1 or $2 an acre
will be worth 15 It will mean
that wjiat is now almost valueless
land will be made nearly as
productive as irrigated land."
El Paso Herald.
Grazing Permits.
"All applications for grazing--permits
on the San Francisco,
Mountains and Black Mesa
Forest Reserves for the season
of 1907 should reach the Flags
taff office before February 1
1907. Applications blanks can
be secured from the rangers or
from T. S. VVoolsey, Jr., Acting
Forest ' Supervisor, Flagstaff
Arizona.";
Very truly yours,
T. S. Woolsey Jr.,
Acting Forest Supervisor.
Why Southern Women Want
v to'Vote ' - '
, A conference of Southern
women suffragists held recently,
at the Pea body Hotel in Mem-,
phis, Tennessee, set forth the
following as one of their reasons
for desiring political en franchise
men t:-
"We ask for the ballot as a
solution of the race, problem:
There- are over 600,000. more
white women in the bouthern
States than all the negro men
and women combined. If tbe
women of the South were en
franchised, it would insure a
I permanent and enormous prepon-
politics, and "would preclude tbe
necessity for any doubtful
expedients to minimize the negro
vote.L'
m a m
Cured of Lung Trouble.
"It is now eleven years since I
had a narrow escape from
consumption," writes C. O. Floyd,
a leading business man of Kers
haw, S. C. ikf had run down in
weight to 135 pounds, and
coughing was constant, both by
day and by night. Finally 1
began taking Dr. King's New
Discovery, and continued this for
about six months, when my cough
and lung trouble were entirely
gone and I was restored to my
normal weight, 170 .pounds."
Thousauds of persons are healed
every year. Guaranteed at St.
Johns Drug Co. drug store. 50c
and $1.00. Trial bottle fre.
Mil

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