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Mesa free press. [volume] (Mesa, Ariz.) 1892-1901, October 12, 1894, Image 4

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060636/1894-10-12/ed-1/seq-4/

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The Abbe Faure left behind him
some interesting reminiscences of i
his experiences of criminals con- <
dernned to death at La Roquette i
prison, where he was for many i
years chaplain. His method* of ;
ingratiating himself with criminals
in order to try to get them to ac- i
cept his religious ministrations was
to begin by offering them tobacco
and tp go with a pack of cards and
offer to play a quiet game of piquet
with them.
1 """ " • •
A Fresno fig grower of consider
able experience, says: “I usually ,
pick my figs when they “break
down in the neck’; they are fully
ripe. I then dip them in a weak
solution of caustic soda, and then ]
in cold sea water and put on trays. <
They should dry in three days. 1
The trouble with our California '
dried figs has been that we dried
them too much. I generally put (
my figs in sweat boxes, and let 1
them even up for about two weeks 1
before packing. 1
>•■» ■< <
A strike of twelve hours d ura- (
tion has ended at the Harris-Cor- j
liss engine works in Providence, \
and over 12,000 mechanics te- <
turned to the shops, without having (
lost any time. At night when the
men left the works they agreed not
to return next day under a reduc -1
tion of wages, which they had been <
notified would go into effect in the <
morning. They immediately stated ]
{he situation to the company, who ]
yielded to the men.
i
The Silver City Enterprise says i
the Mogollon country is simply
swarming with bears. They seem
to have traveled long distances in
all directions to get into the moun
tains where there is plenty of mast.
It is an every day affair to see
three or four of the animals if you
are camping in or travelling thro’
the mountains; and one man com
ing down the east side of the
Mogollons saw 14 one day.
The standard silver dollar will
celebrate its centennial on the 15th
of October, says the Mining <fc Sci
entific Press, the first lot of U. S.
silver dollars—l7sß in number—
having been issued on October 15 th
1794. Many millions have been
minted since then, and it would
have better for the country every
way if many more millions had been
issued in the last twenty-one years
—since the demonetization of sil
ver in ‘73.
The great textile strike in New
Bedford, Mass., was broken up last
week, when at a meeting of the
‘Weavers’ Union the employes of
the Pierce mill were instructed to
go back to work. The officers of
this company have decided not only
to pay the old seale, but they fur
nish specifications of work as de
manded by the strikers, making the
victory for the latter complete.
The early resumption of work by
all other doth mills is looked for.
It is authoritively stated that
the Globe smelters will resume
operations by the first of Novem
ber. In fact they have entered
negotiations with the Gila Valley,
Globe & Northern railway for
transportation of one to two million
pounds of coke per month, and
freiarht out of the copper product
from the same—delivery to begin
November Ist.—Times.
Monday evening Sheriff Olney
came into Solomonville from the
lower part of the valley with a re
port he had heard down there that
Indians had come off the reserva
tion, and killed three men belong
ing to the Ohirioahua outfit, and a
man and a woman at Warm Springs
at the head of Ash Greek. This
report was brought in by Bob
Hughes.—Times,
Senator Vest declared in a speech
at Kansas City recently that “free
coinage in the United States will
not flood the country with silver,
as is so often predicted. Thefluro
pean nations will not send the bil
lions of silver, which they now use
at a ratio of 16£ to 1 as standard
money, to be coined here at the
ratio of 16 to 1, which would in
volve an enormous loss in the ratio,
besides cost of transportation. I
protest agaiust the United States
continuing a policy which increases
the burdens of the laboring and
debtor classes in order to increase
the incomes of the rich.”
Mme. Bernhardt has lately fur
nished the key to h6r nature in a
declaration made to a Paris jour
nalist: “I always burn ray boats
behind me. What is past is past;
1 trouble no more about it. And
the same as regards the future. I
enjoy the moment and give no
thought to what may happen to
morrow. So long as 1 have suffi
cient money for the needs of the
day I am happy. Whenever a
notion seizes me that I would like
to do a certain thing, I carry out
the idea at once, be it ever so ec
centric.”
There is a report current that a
lot of Apache scouts at San Oarlos,
dissatisfied with their rations,broke
away one day last week, and things
looked bilious for a time. A com
pany of regulars was sent from Ft.
Apache, and after a good deal of
trouble returned the- recalcitrant
scouts to duty.—Times.
Queen Victoria is now afflicted
so constantly by rheumatism that
she has abandoned her proposed
trip to Italy during the coming
winter or spring, and her present
plan is to take a course of waters
at Aixles Bains or Weisbaden,
where she will also undergo mas
sage.
An Anderson, Indiana, dispatch
svys : Ground was broken for the
National Tin Plate mills. The
first building will be 88x500 feet.
Six mills will be in operation with
in ninety days and six more within
eight months This will make one
of the largest plants in the United
States.
The railroad between Solomon
ville and Bowie is using wood for
its locomotives, considering it
cheaper than coal. It has the ad
ditional merit of giving a number
of people an opportunity to put in
wood at a living rate.—Prospector.
At Santa Clara, Cal., Rudolph
Spreckels, son of Claus Spreckels,
is about to build a large sugar re
finery on 216 acres of land which
he has just secured. A big well
will be sunk and ths plant will soon
be in operation.
“Look here,” said the proprietor
of the lunch establishment, “this
coin has a hole in it.” “Well,”
replied Meandering Mike, “so had
the doughnut ye sold me.” And
he strode haughtily out.
The favorite flowers of the Prin
cess of Wales are the lily of the
valley and the Alexandria orchid.
The Duchess of York loves the
white rose.
Adelina Patti is fond of the
carnati on.
Ellen Terry prefers the large
white rose.
The rose is Sara Bernhardt’s
special delight.
Mme. de Stael, the Russiane rnbas
sador’s wife, shares the preference
of Queen Victoria for violets.
Lady Dudley’s favorite flower is
the tall white St. Joseph lily.
Lady Playfair’s favorite flower is
the red rose.
Mrs. Clevelsnd loves the may
flower.
KIMBALL HOUSE-
The Pioneer Hotel of Mesa.
WM. A. KIMBALL, Proprietor,
BEST OF KCCOMMODRTIONS.
For the traveling public.
«•
Tables furnished with best the market affords.
Feed Stable in connection. Horses boarded by the
day, week or month. Mesa, Arizona.
W SHAKE!
We have received for the summer trade an assortment
::of::
Croquet Setts
a>xid Fa.ns*
THE IRVINE CO.
35 and 37 East Washington St PHOENIX, Ariz
SANTA FE, PRESCOTT & PHOENIX
RAILWAY COMPANY.
TIME TABLE NO. 7:
In effect Sunday,August 6th, 1894. Mountain
time is standard used.
BOUTHWARD. | NORTHWARD.
121 103 STATIINS 104 122
725 a 405 p lv Ash Fork ar 150 p 610 p
835 500 p Rock Bute 12 65 p 600 p
905 525 p Cedar Ola 12 25 p 415 p
945 555 p Del Rio 11 50 p 3 30 p
10 10 613 p Clear Spr 11 35 p 3IS p
10 30 630 p Jerome Jn Hlsp 348 p
1105 I 6 45p Granite 1105 p 235
11 46 a| 16 p Ar Prescott 110 40 a 200
SOUTHERN EXTENSION. «
201 Lv Prescott Ar 202
800 am Prescott 100 pm
8 40 Iron Springs 12 80
8 46 Sumit 12 25
9 10 Rams Gate 11 57
930 am Ar.... Skull Valley....Lv 1130 am
Trains 103 and 104 run d Uy and make close
connections at Ash Fork with trains 8 and 4 on
A&P R R Trains 121 runs daily except Sun
day, and 122 dai’y except Saturday, and con
nect with trains a and 2 on A &P R R 9 Ash
Fork.
Trains 201 and 202 run daily and connect with
stage line carrying passenger and U S Mail to
and from Phoenix, via Stanton, Congress,
Wickenburg, Vulture and Calderwood,
G. W. VAUGHN, V. P. & Gen Man.
R R COLEMAN, Superintendent
F A HEALY, General Pass Agent.
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NEW GOODS!
The finest line of Dress
Goods in the valley and our
prices as usual the lowest.
| Our cloak department is the
finest and largest in the
Territory, all the latest
styles and materials. We
sell Dry Goods, Clothing,
Shoes, Hats and Furnish
ings cheaper than any house
in Phoenix.
Tie MME D. 6.
and Clothing Co,
Leaders of Low Prices
and New Goods.
COTTON BLOCK, PHCENIX:
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vvv>SffSnfiSßß?vvwvvwww <wywwww>aaaaa
Alhambra Hotel
E. 1. IiONO, PROP.
Macdonald St. - Mesa, A.T.
BEST OF ACCOM MOD ATI OS
For the Travelling Public.
i Private family board. Tables furnished with
the best the market affords. Charges reason
i able.
1
WWWWWV^P
I
)
»
STEVENS & ALBRIGHT ,
Cor. Montezuma and Adams Sts.,
: Livery, Feed and
Sale Stable
Good turnouts on short notice’at al
hours of the day and night.
Buy, se;l and trade horses
Special attention to boarding horses
5
j ELECTRIC BELT FREE,
* To introduce it and obtain agents
the undersigned firm will give away a
; few of their $5.00 German Electric
Belts invented by Prof. Van der Weyde
‘ Pres-of the New York Electrical So
ciety (U. S. Pat. 257,647) a positive
* cure for Nervous Debility, Kheuma
- tism, Loss of Power, etc. Address at
once Electric Agency, P. O. Box 1874
J New York N. Y.
lsfcAVkAh I HAUL MARKER
•W COPYRIGHTS.^
CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT ? For a
prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to
MUNN & CO., who have had nearly fifty years’
i experience in the patent business. Communica
) tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In
formation concerning Patents and how to ob
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan
leal and scientific books sent free.
Patents taken through Mann A Co. receive
special notice In the Scientific American, and
thus are brought widely before the public with
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper.
Issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the
; largest circulation of any scientific work in the
world. 93 a year. Sample copies sent free.
Building Edition, monthly, $2.60a year. Single
copies, 25 cents. Every number contains beau
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the
latest designs and secure contracts. Address
NUNN £ CO., Nsw York, 301 Broadway.
mesa.
MEAT MARKET
OPENSHAW BROS., PROPS.
Fresh Meats
Os All Kinds.
FULLERS OLD STAND , MACDONALD
AVENUE, MESA CITY .
jgfPrices to suit the times.
JOSEPH E, JOHNSON.
Salesman.
Pioneer Blacksmith Slop!
TURMAN & HORN, PROPS.
Wagon and Carriage Making and
Repairing. Horshoeing. Inter
fering horses a Specialty.
SAT/SFAGTIN GUARANTEED.
Cor. Main and Center Sts, Me&a.
lie Mutual Life Insurance Co.,
ODF 1 HEW TTOZESaC:.
Writes all forms of Life and Investment Policies. Being the oldes
Company in the United States, and largest in the World, it is the on
to nsure in. Ask for information whether you want Insurance or not
I_. T. WOOD, jAf’t,
PHOENIX, ARIZONA.
w. s. johnsonT
The liberal Manager of the
MESA NURSERY CO
Is now anxious to make you prices on Citrus, Deciduous
and Olive Trees, Shade and Ornamentals, Shrubs. Vine*
and Flowers.
Will supply first-class stock at bottom price*.
©
All STOCK IS GUARANTEED.
DR. GEO. H. KEEFER,
Druggist, Chemist, pi tliecary and dealerin
Pm Medicine, Faef tits, Mitry nl Star;
Doctor’s Prescriptions Carefully Compounded.
OPERA HOUSE DRUG STORE, Phtwiix
\ DYKE’S IMPROVED TRIPLEX PUMP
A Well Pump, Windmill Pump and Irrigating Pump. Gan he fififii
! by hand, animal, steam or gasoline. Observe how frictiea ii reduced Me a
, minimum by the application of the cam and tappel. Gen be p<fi ie
; power. Sizes 2to 12 inches. Two fijst premiums at Cwmmlg BNRfi Wlto
i in 1892 and one first premium at the Stoekton Fair.
Address TONEY & HtRX. lta.fi,
$3,000.00
A YEAR
FOR THE INDUSTRIOUS,
xperience, and furnish the v
uey can make that amount. Nothing diffle.
yarn or that reauires much time. The wot :
iisy healthy, ana honorable, andean be done <.
d aytime or evening., right in your own !,
;y, wherever you live. Tie result «f a i
lours’ work often equals a week s w pt
■Ve have taught thou.and.of both mx.s an..
,ge3, and many have laid foundation, that
urely bring them riche.. Some of the iwfi; •
;ien In this country owe their recce., in lit
he start given them while in our employ -f
ujo. You,reader,may do a. it- >
•annot fail. No capital ne«e.sary. We it you ■-•
•vith something that is new, ■olid, and suro .
,ook brimful of advice is free to all. Help >
self by writing for it to-day—not te-morrj/.
Delay, are costly.
E. C. ALLEN A •©>,
Box 420,
AUCUSTA, MAIM.

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