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Duncan Arizonian. [volume] (Duncan, Greenlee County, Ariz.) 1908-1915, August 07, 1912, Image 1

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DUNCAN, the GATE-WAY
TO THE GOLD FIELDS
FIFTH YEAR
Mormons Arriving
The Mormons which are leav
ing Mexico are arriving daily at
the border towns and are being
cared for by their friends, rela
tives and the Church at various
places in this country.
500 arrived at Hachita this
week in 87 wagons; Mesa has a
large portion of them; Thatcher,
in Graham county, is receiving
large numbers and Franklin near
here will care for its part.
They do not know when they
will be able to return, if ever, to
Mexico.
Immigration of Teachers
If the present immigration of
school teachers continues very
long the new state of Arizona
will not only have a big popula
tion, but it will be. one that will
rank high, educationally. Besides
the home grown school teachers,
which crop is coming along fa
mously, Superintendent of Public
Instruction, Case, has since the
26th of June registered the di
plomas of 46 teachers, forwarded
here from other states. But that
is only part of the story. School
teachers all over the world are
hearing about Arizona, and are
writing for information with a
view of coming here. Mr. Case
says that he is receiving and an
swering an average of forty let
ters of this kind every day. They
inquire about the school system,
salaries and school facilities. Not
all are from teachers, though
most of them are. The others
are from heads of families who
desire to move here and want to
know of the opportunities for the
education of their children. If
only one in ten of his correspond
ents should decide to come he
may be counted upon to add a
population of 1500 annually,
which is doing well enough for
one man. —Republican.
Education
The Tempe Normal School and
the University of Arizona are
now working on a course of study
in agriculture to be given in the
Normal school and to be articu
lated with the courses in farming
in the University. Ih the study
of this problem the agricultural
course in the high schools will be
taken up and an attempt made
to frame a course that will suit
the needs of these schools. The
Mesa and the Phoenix high
schools are already offering an
agricultural course for next year.
Clean and Sanitary * Edibles
E. W. Taylor received another
carload of ice Saturday. Mr.
Taylor is not only supplying ice
but is keeping his perishable veg
etables. meats, butter, eggs &
etc, in cold storage, free frm flies
and filth, sanitary and clean.
This precaution is preserving
health and providing comfort, is
worthy due consideration by ev
ery purchaser and prospective
purchaser. E. W. is true to his
motto: ‘‘Up-to-date,” “Anxious
to please” and “He leads them
all.”
The five days sale at E. W.
Taylor’s closed, as advertised,
Saturday. We are informed by
Mr, Taylor that the sale was a
very successful one and was even
much better than expected. This
is always a dull season in most
any business line and then the
river was up during the five
days of the sale, yet many peo
ple managed to cross at a risk
and even came a foot and crossed
the bridge. Mr. Taylor leaves
soon for the Eastern Markets
where he will purchase fall and
winter goods. He advises his
customers to wait till they see
his new stock before making any
purchases.
See his ad.
DUNCAN ARIZONIAN.
Devoted to the Interests of Greenlee County, State of Arizona and Southwestern New Mexico.
Potter Tells Story of Trip
Across Country
Urges upon the People along
the Route of the Ocean
to Ocean Highway the
Importance of the
Work to be Ac
complished
Dell M. Potter, National Or
ganizer of the Ocean to Ocean
Highway, who made the trip in
the Los Angeles Times Organiz
ing car from Los Angeles to New
York City, has been busily en
gaged at his ranch two miles
above Clifton, since his return
attending to his private business
affairs which had accumulated
during his absence.
An Era reporter found Mr.
Potter at his home on Thursday
just as enthusiastic as ever over
the Ocean to Ocean Highway,
along the Santa Fe trail, as adopt
ed and approved by the Good
Roads Association of California.
Arizona, New Mexico, Kansas
and other states, nine in all,
which states sent representatives
to the Good Roads Convention at
Kansas City last year. In speak
ing of the trip across the United
States in the Los Angeles Times
car, Mr. Potter said:
‘ ‘Our trip was a most success
ful one from many standpoints.
We left Los Angeles on the even
ing of the 15th of May, and ar
rived in New York on the 13th
of July. Across Arizona the line
of road followed was the one
adopted by the Phoenix Conven
tion and later adopted by the
Kansas City Convention, across
New Mexico from Magdalena to
Socoro and then followed the Co
mino Real to Santa Fe, from
.there we followed the Santa Fe
trail to Las Vegas, Raton, and
thence through Colorado via.
Trinidad and La Junta, and
through Kansas along the line of
the old Santa Fe trail via Fort
Dodge, McPhearson, Marion,
Olathe and Kansas City, Kansas
Kansas City, Mo., Independence,
Lexington, Marshall, Booneville,
New Franklin, Columbia, New
Florence St. Charles and St.
Louis.
“The Santa Fe Trail ends at
Booneville, and from there we
followed the Boons Lick Road to
St. Louis, where we followed the
Cumberland or National Pike
through the other States to Cum
berland.
‘ ‘Through Illinois this road runs
through Highlands, Effingham,
Greenup, Marshall and to Terre
Haute, Ind., to Indianopolis and
Richmond, thence through* Ohio
via. Springfield, Columbus, Zan
esville, Cambridge and to Wheel
ing, West Va.
“Wheeling to Uniontown, Pa.,
thence to Cumberland, Md.
From Cumberland the road will
run through Freerick to Washing
ton, D. C., Washington to Balti
more, thence to Wilmington,
Deleware, thence back into Penn
sylvania to Philadelphia, to Tren
ton, N. J., and Newark, thence
into New York City.
“In the nine states which join
ed our association at Kansas City
we have a pledged membership
of 276,364, and the other states
have joined, but we did not have
time to closely organize.
“We expect to be able to close
ly organize these remaining
states before the convening of
Congress with a total member
ship of 500,000.”
Speaking of the outlook for
federal aid for the Ocean to
Ocean Highway, along j the old
Santa Fe trail, Mr. Potter con
tinued:
“If we expect to get the first
DUNCAN, GREENLEE COUNTY, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1912
Announcement of Candi
dacy by Hayden
Present Member inCongress
out to Succeed Himself
In conformity with the primary
law, Representative Carl Hayden
has filed in the office of the Sec
retary of State a statement to
the effect that he is a candidate
for the Democratic nomination
for Congress at the coming elec
tion.
The communication from Hay
den to Secretary Osborn is as fol
lows:
“To the Secretary of State,
“Phoenix, Arizona.
“Sir: I desire to become a can
didate, at the primary election,
to be held on Thursday, the 10th
bay of September, 1912, for the
nomination of the Democratic
party, as the candidate of said
party for Representative in Con
gress, at the election to be held
in the state of Arizona, on Tues
day, the sth day of November.
1912. My place of residence is
800 North First avenue, in the
city of Phoenix, and my postoffice
address is Phoenix, Maricopa
county, Arizona. I respectfully
request that my name be printed
on the official ballot at the pri
mary election to be held on Tues
day, the 10th day of September,
1912.
“You are further notified that
I have not authorized and will
not authorize any person to ex
pend or propose to expend any
money in defraying the expenses
of my campaign, but that I will,
in person, account for all the
money or other things of value
expended in the interest of my
candidacy for the office of Rep
resentative in Congress.
“CARL HAYDEN.”
appropriation for our line of the
National Highway we must have
a great organization all along the
entire line of this road. Each
town and city must get busy.
There is no dodging this issue.
If we want the National High
way go after it in a business way.
If not drop it and the other fel
low will get it. No individual
can do this alone, no organiza
tion without the help of all of
the people can do it, and it is
now up to the people.
“There is ‘nothing this state
can do, nothing any state along
the line of this Highway can do,
whicn will benefit it so much as
working for this Highway. It
will bring into our state men
who have the means to develop
our undeveloped resources, be
the means of settling up our state
with the very best class of peo
ple, make our climate and our
scenic wonders our greatest un
developed assets bringingmillions
of dollars into our state that can
be brought in no other way. I
say without fear of contradiction
that this state could afford to
bond for sufficient money to build
this entire National Highway
and be the best investment it
could make, but it is not neces
sary. All that is required is to
get busy and help the Ocean to
Ocean Highway Association
which has bound all these states
together and by a grdat member
ship show the Congressmen and
Senators in these states that we
demand Federal aid for part of
the cost of construction of this
National Highway and we will
get it.” —Era.
A Local Option petition is be
ing circulated in Duncan, Shel
don and York by Saloon advocat
es for an election upon the prop
osition of changing this from
“dry” to “wet” territory.
$13,000,000 Will be As
sessment for Greenlee
Abstract of Assessment Roll
of this County Compiled
by Clerk Terry of Board
of Supervisors and
Forwarded to State
Board of Equali
zation
Clerk of the Board of Super
visors, A. L. Terry, this week
compiled an abstract of the As
sessment Roll of Greenlee county
and forwarded same to the State
Board of Equalization at Phoen
ix.
The total assessed valuation of
Greenlee county as turned in by
the Assessor after making de
ductions on account of property
owned by widows and subtract
ing the reductions made by the
Board of Equalization amounts
to 810,568,765.52. This report
does not include the raises made
by the County Board of Equali
zation or the State Tax Commis
sion. It is estimated that when
the County Board of Equaliza
tion shall have finished the equal
ization of the property in Green
lee county, and the additional
raises authorized by the State
Tax Commission are adned to the
roll, the total assessment of
Greenlee county for the year 1912
will be approximately $13,000,-
000.
The report rendered by Clerk
Terry is as follows:
Office of Board of Supervisors
To the State Board of Equali
zation:
Below find Abstract of the As
sessmedt Roll of Greenlee county
for the year 1912.
1562 acres Cultivated land,
$46,860.00.
14,339 acres Uncultivated land,
$238,321.00.
Improvements on land, $49,-
420.00.
Hroductive patented mines, $5,-
284,000.00.
Improvements on mines, $2,-
327,681.68.
Non-productive patented mines
$827,712.50.
6 patented mill sites $1,000.00.
3 smelters, $225,1000.00.
1043 Town and City lots, $91,-
140.00.
Improvements on town and
city lots, $259,650.
4 Banks, Capital Stock, Surplus
and Undivided profits, $63,403.64
272 range horses, $2,925.00.
332 work horses, $13,490.00.
395 saddle horses, $10,000.00.
9 stallions, $1,150.00.
104 mules, $4,880.00.
49 asses, $520.00.
8956 range cattle, $111,937.00.
1 beef cattle, $15.00.
176 milch cows, $4,395.00.
164 bulls, $4,925,00.
1,000 goats, $2,000.00.
20 goats (bucks), SIOO.OO.
Stocks of merchandise, $460,-
405.00.
4 automobiles, $1,550.00.'
41.20 miles, standard gauge
railroad, $495,480.00.
24.96 miles narrow gauge rail
road, $206,136.00.
All other property, $334,306.70.
Total value of property, sll,-
098,503.52.
Widows exemptions, $13,650.00
Reductions by the Board of
Equalization July meeting*
$516,088.00.
Net valuation, $10,568,765.52.
Rev. Rose superintendent of
the New Mexico state Sunday
School and Endeavor work came
down from Lords burg Monday to
visit a cousin, Mrs. Will Foster,
whom he had not seen for years.
Mr. Rose gave this office a short
but pleasant call.
National Progressive Co
nvention is in Session
“Lily Whites” Seated Color
ed Brethren Barred
Chicago, 111., Aug. s.—The
national committee of the Pro
gressive party today settled the
Florida contest by seating the so
called “lily whites.”
The negro delegation stripped
the Roosevelt buttons off the
lapels of their coats.
The platform will be built on
Roosevelt’s “confession of faith”
and will contain many planks
along radical lines. The national
committee decided after long
procrastination to shut out the
negro contesting delegations
from Florida and Mississippi.
Senator Beveridge in his keynote
speech said: “Knowing full well
the cost, we enlist for war.”
Governor Johnson for vice
president was given new impetus
when it was announced that
Roosevelt regards the Californi
an as a great campaigner, whose
services on the stump are invalu
able.
National Chairman Dixon said:
“a new political party knowing
no north or south, founded on
live issues, is about to take its
place with those which live on
dead issues of the past.
Pennsylvania came in with a
new ditty, ‘ ‘Hang Boise Penrose
on a Sour Apple Tree. ” New
Jersey contributed “The Grand
Old Party is a Mouldering in its
Grave.” Roosevelt will not ap
pear at the convention until
Tuesday.
—Arizona State News —
Banks in Arizona. 38 State
Banks, and 13 National Banks
have total resources June 14,
1912, $29,312,624,36. An increase
of $3,199,623.68 since September
sth, 1911.
Arizona will have total state
valuation approximating $160,-
000,000. Last year the total was
$100,000,000. Increase one year
$60,000,000.
Arizona attracting increased
number of summer visitors. Flag
staff, Grand Canyon, Williams,
Winslow, Prescott and Holbrook
hrve unusual attractions. Dry
mountain air, cool clear nights.
Arizona is a leader of Nation
in matters pertaining to educa
tion. University of Arizona of
fers splendid opportunity for
complete Agricultural course.
Well equipped schools and colleg
es are established throughout
the New State.
Arizona’s roads soon to be
finest in the country. Governor
of Arizona has directed employ
ment of convicts in road building.
Splendid concrete bridge now
being constructed and roads at
five different points in the State
being built by convict labor.
At present estimate, two houses
a day are being built in Phoenix,
Arizona. A year ago estimate
was house and one-half a day.
Over 150 houses in course of con
struction at present time. More
houses at moderate rental are in
demand. Building continues on
the increase. Federal Building
rapidly approaching completion
and plans being laid for eight
story office building. Street pav
ing continues over all important
streets, and erection of ornament
al lights being extended in sever
al directions. City market mak
ing good showing, inspector has
been appointed by City Council.
Splendid buildings of Polytechnic
High School costing $250,000, re
ceiving finishing touches. Wo*ik
on sewer system is being pushed
ahead.
A FARMING VALLEY
A MINING CENTER
Baby Daughter of L. N.
Polland Drowns in
Ditch
Child Falls in Water While
Mother Prepares Break
fast; Father Summoned
to Phoenix
L. N. Polland has been advise'l
by telegram of the death by ac
cidental drowning of his two
year old daughter, Edna, at
Phoenix, where his family re
sides. The family resides on the
Black Canron road, near Phoenix,
and an irrigation ditch runs past
the house. The child’s body was
found in the ditch two miles be
low the house.
While Mrs. Polland was engag
ed in preparing breakfast, the
little girl wondered from the
house. When her mother missed
her she went into the yard and
called in vain. Suspecting that
the child had fallen into the lat
teral Mrs. Polland followed it
for two miles until she came to
the body which- had lodged
against an obstruction. The chi 1 d
seemed to gasp and a gurgling
sound was heard which filled the
mother with hope. She carried
the body to the house of J. J.
Morgan nearby and efforts at
resusitation were made, but life
was extinct. —Gazette.
One of the largest cattle deals
in the history of the county was
made last week when J. H. T.
Cosper and Geo. Webster formed
a partnership and purchased the
ranch, horses & etc, belonging
to Chas. Thomas, on the Blue.
The consideration is reported to
have been $50, 000.00. Mr. Thom -
as has been a resident of this
county for more than thirty
years and is held in the highest
esteem by his neighbors and
many friends throughout the
country. Mr. Thomas expects to
remove, with his family, to Hoi—,,
brook.
J. F. Fraser, one of the di
rectors of the Twin Peaks Mining
Company, returned to Clifton
this week from Cedar Rapids,
lowa, where he had been in the
interest of the company. Mr.
Fraser stated to the Copper Era
that he met with splendid success
on his trip and will return to
lowa shortly. Some of the prom
inent capitalists and business
men of that section are now
stockholders in the Twin Peaks
comyany and the affairs of that
company were never in better
shape since its inception.
Mr. Roy Way land and Mr.
Dean Mason returned overland
from Springerville on Saturday
last returning from a trip to
Flagstaff on a visit to Mrs. Wav
land and Miss Mary Murtaugh,
who had been in attendance upon
the session of the Northern Ari
zona Normal. Messrs. Wayland
and Mason rode to Clifton from
Springerville on horseback mak
ing the trip in three days. Mrs.
Wayland and Miss Murtaugh are
at present visiting in Los Angel
es.
Frank B. Dorr and wife are
new arrivals in Clifton coming
here from Bisbee and intend to
make this place their home foi
the future. Mr. Dorr has been a
resident of Cochise county for
the past ten years and durint
the administration of J. S. Will
iams as district attorney of that
county, Mr. Dorr served two
terms as assistant district at tor
ney. Before Hon. Joe Mori isoi
was appointed United States At
torney Mr. Dorr was a member
of the law firm of Morrison c;
Dorr. Mr. and Mrs. Dorr express
themselves as agreeably surpris
ed at the business activity ot'
Clifton.—Era.
7th WEEK

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