OCR Interpretation


Arizona sentinel. [volume] (Yuma, Ariz.) 1916-1918, August 31, 1916, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060878/1916-08-31/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

rs itrost rt'A,-" -
h': fit .
VOLUME 47
FIRST IN ADVERTISING FIRST IN NEWS FIRST IN INFLUENCE
Setting a Pace for Competitors Forging Ahead to Greater Things Over Roads of Its Own Making
YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1916.
NUMBER 39.
" The absolute indifference of the average corporation to the rights and comforts of the great consuming public was never better exempli
fied than yesterday and today by the Yuma Electric and Water company.
Witho fc. a reasonable excuse of r its utter afilure to supply power, lights, gas for cooking or water in any satisfactory manner to the
public for some time, the company has completely failed for the past two days to deliver any service except such as was little short of an
aggravation, and patrons have been saved time, patience and cash if the plant had shut down. In that event, Yuma business interests could
have completed plans to connect with the Sanguinetti-Yuma Ice Company plant, which has been ready and willing to supply the town with its
power and light service since August 15th, and the negligent company has had ample time to hook on and save Yuma people the many tor
tures and inconveniences of an all but complete shut down.
The Morning Glory did for once tell the truth this morning when it said "Municipal Ownership Is Becoming Popular."
Common courtesy would dictate that the Yuma Electric and Water Company issue a warning to its patrons through the newspapers to
draw water for drinking purposes. Though the Yuma Electric and Water Company withdrew its advertising from the Examiner on Aug.
20th, such a notice to our 5000 readers will be printed without charge.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooocoooooooooooooo
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Box and Chair and A Bathing Suit!
Now For First Kellermann Lesson!
This Tells You How to Make the "Breast Stroke," the Very First Essential
Movement; Breathing and Its Relation to Swimming; You Will Be Swim
ming Within a We ik from Today.
ooooooooooooocooooooooooooocooopooooooooooo
ARTICLE NUMBER FOUR
' " ANNETTE
BY ANNETTE KELLERMANN
International Record-Holder and Star
of the Wm. Fox $1,000,000 Film
"A Daughter of the Gods."
Before taking up THE BREAST
STROKE, I want you to obtain the
following articles:
1. A piano stool, or some box
strong enough to sustain your
weight.
2. A kitchen chair.
3. A one-piece bathing suit or
like garment to wear while going
through the exercises.
4. A cushion or a pillow.
Now, before starting, OPEN ALL
WINDOWS. Fresh air is vitally es
sential to good health.
Place the piano stool or box in the
center of the room and lay the cush
ion on top of it. Then place the
chair directly behind it, but a short
distance removed. Lay yourself so
that your stomach is on the stool or
box and your legs on the chair.
Keep your chest clear of the stool.
That part of your body commencing
where the ninth rib rests should just
clear the edge of the stood.
, Now place your hands on a level
with your chest, palms downward and
hands side by side. Do NOT place
your hands in the usual attitude of
prayer. This old method of starting
the breast stroke is wrong and, be
sides it means an extra movement.
Keep your hands flat. Now bring
them forward as if to dive. Stretch
them straight out as far as you can.
Keep them on a level with the chin.
Raise your head a trifle so as to clear
the imaginary water.
You are now lying flat with arms
extended as though making a dive.
Turn your hands until the palms are
facing outward, then as if cleaving or
KELLERMANlK!,
GREATEST WOMl
SWIMMER AWC -Va.TJ
OF WILLIAM "OX
SlOCCCOO PICTURE
' ' m i ather plowing the water bring them
COSI OF PAPER GOES 0P; OUR
READERS SHOULD G01E ACROSS
If
bacl. in a wide circle until they are
on a level with your shoulders.
While you are making this move
ment, inhale a deep breath. With the
next movement bend the albow and
pf I keeping the hands flat so as to cut
if i the water, bring them back to their
original position on chest and under
f the chin.
Continue this movement until you
do it FAULTLESSLY. Keep it up
juntil you are able to do it with per
fect ease.
Should this exercise make your
muscles ache and become stiff, a- few
Through a force of circum
stances, over which we have
no control, and which make
self protection necessary, the
Yuma . Daily. JaminerJs to
day eliminating a hundred
papers from its exchange
list.
This action is not taken
through any lack of appreci
ation of the papers with
which it has been exchang
ing for many years, but be
cause the scarcity and the
excessive cost of news print
paper makes the conserva
tion of that commodity abso-
papers are doing likewise.
As every newspaper publisher thru
out the United States knows full well,
the price of paper has increased 100
per cent within the last five months;
ink prices, too, have increased fully
50 per cent. Paper is not only high
in cost, but hard to get at any price,
and the manufacturers and jobbers
are at their wits' ends trying to solve
the problem of keeping publishers
supplied. - C ..---u. .
The Examiner will not increase its
subscription rates or its advertising
rates, but it asks all of its subscribers
who have not yet paid their subscrip
tion to the paper to do so now.
Unless many subscriptions are paid
soon it will be necessary' for the Ex
aminer to eliminate from the sub
scription lists the names of all of
those in arrears. Such an action
would be taken with deep regret, but
the fact that the costs of publication
have nearly doubled within a few
months, coupled with the fact that
paper is hard to get at any price,
make it necessary that only those Ex
aminer readers who pay for their
paper, shall receive it. Self preserva
tion is the first law of nature, and the
Examiner cannot do othwise than to
ask our good friends to "come across."
(Continued on Page Three)
A much bigger issue than
the impending railway strike
now confronts the country
It is not a new one but it has
never before been so clearly
drawn. It is the matter of
the prevention of strikes
which affect the public dis
astrously. In a statement on Tuesday
W. G. Lee, head of one of
the railway brotherhoods,
said:
' "Since the abolition of
slavery no more effectual
means has been devised for
insuring the bondage of the
working man than the pass
age of the compulsory inves
tigation acts of the character
of the Canadian industrial
disputes act."
This is a clear-cut objection to the
principle of arbitration, which must
now be settled one way or the other.
There must be either arbitration or
no arbitration, says the Arizona Re
publican. All the fooling with this
a
(Continued on Page Three)

xml | txt