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Arizona sentinel. [volume] (Yuma, Ariz.) 1916-1918, August 31, 1916, Image 3

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060878/1916-08-31/ed-1/seq-3/

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STAG AUTO SERVICE
W. E. SNYDER, Prop.
J. P. YEMEN, DENTIST
Phone 225-J
W. H. ELLIOTT
tnprnl Survounr- Rn-r- 1 7K vumn
F. E. ELLIOTT
The Valley Store
Oils.
Phone SI
NfilJINETTI. P.? Bie DeDart-
ment Store for everytmng at wnoie-
saie ana retau; separate iiumium
u 1-1 1 umiiL. KiuLciicoi ouwtei
arv eooaa. rei. z.
TOM UNDERBILL
"THE TRANSFER MAN"
111 move anjuung irum & yiuuu
cord of wood. Phone 28-J
MA TITLE ABSTRACT & TRUST
COMPANY
Secretary. Title Manager.
DR. E. C. CLENDENIN
DENTIST
'Phone 255
CLIFF HOUSE
a. HP. -f r A H Mnn1 T r
lower uaui. inu. jloo muumuu
43-lm-p
PAINTING AND FINISHING
HULL WilULUlg paiUllllg Ul liUiaiilllS
nil ."MlHf'lH I HI IHI1I Iflll l.tl tlllfcl-
job too small and none too large.
e me a uiai. oo-u.
YUMA
Prompt Service
Rates Reasonable
160 MAIN STREET
a"- 4 Ta TTh r 1
July 30
HIGH CLASS
ATTNDRY WORK AT
ALPHA LAUNDRY
P. Avila, Prop.
ininp- innatinn Tintmpsr A nw lot
CHAS. OLCESTER
IMhKI firM 1 KUI.HIH1 HH I.H
Nn p.cmpnt rnNRTR rT nN-
nuuot r( u. dva uo. i u iiim.
loneer Livery s
Transfer Co.
none o -u- -u- luain
it to have a third ticket this year
uld be impracticable, thus catching
with Col. Roosevelt at last.
(Continued from Page Three)
movements in physical culture will
soon make them right again.
The following exercises will surely
strengthen the muscles of the stomach
and make you feel more comfortable
after your breast stroke exercise:
1. Lie flat on the floor. Raise the
left leg bending the knee until the leg
is at right angles. Then lower the
leg without bending the knee. Alter
nate movements of legs, taking first
the right and then the left leg. Do
this about five times with each leg
twenty.
2. Now raise BOTH legs and do
this from ten to twenty times.
3. Control your breathing. Inhale
slowly through the nose and exhale
through the mouth.
4. Stand up and continue the
breathing exercise from three to five
minutes. I cannot impress upon you
too much the immense value of the,
proper breathing either for its own
sake or in conjunction with swim
ming. O course, you understand that all
of these exercises are to be done in
the one-piece suit. Your body must
be free and it cannot be if you wear
many of the senseless garments with
which we humans are afflicted.
TOMORROW: The leg stroke will be
described so that you may make it
with ease. This is the next neces
sary stroke for you to know. And,
knowing this and the breast stroke,
your training is well under way.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
O Annette Kellermann, O
O Care of Yuma Daily Examiner, O
O Dear Miss Kellermann: . O
O I herewith enroll as a member O
O of The Yuma Daily Examiner- O
O Annette Kellermann Dry-Land O
O Swimming Classes and will very O
O closely follow 3rour instructions O
O throughout this series. O
O I also promise to be subject O
O to practice calls from the editor O
O of The Yuma Daily Examiner, O
O and will report for practice at O
O designated places whenever pos- O
O sible.
O Name r O
O O
O Street O
O O
O City O
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
YUMA NEGLECTING
FINE OPPORTUNITY
A striking example of the ways in
which Yuma neglects her opportuni
ties to advertise the advantages of
fered to the home seekers by the
Yuma project was exhibited yester
day. When passenger train No. 9 arrived
at its usual time, half an hour after
noon, it was found that the airbrakes
were out of order and the train was
held an hour and four minutes at the
car shops while the necessary repairs
were being made.
During this time the passengers
were entertaining themselves by
walking up and down between their
train and strings of freight cars on
either side when they might have
been viewing the magnificent speci
mens of Yuma agricultural products
if there had been any such in sight.
We have an exhibit house at the
station, where the trains never stop
more than five minutes; but it is now
used as a lunch counter and the agri
cultural exhibit is a thing of the
past.
Would it not be a good plan to
move the house to a place on the
west side of Madison avenue near the
car shops and keep it stocked with
samples of Yumau gricultural and
mining products. A strong lunged
man could be on hand at every day
time train to call the attention of
passengers to the exhibit, and it is but
COMMERCE RE
EE
Washington, D. C, Sept. 1
A summary of the general
results of the 1914 census of
manufactures with respect to
the printing and publishing
industry has been issued by
Director Sam L. Rogers, of
the Bureau of Census, De
partment of Comemrce.
It consists of a statement prepared
under the direction of Mr. William M.
Steuart, chief statistician for manu
factures, showing for 1914 and 1909,
the number, circulation, and receipts
of newspapers and periodicals, and
the number and receipts of establish
ments doing job printing and of es
tablishments printing and publishing
books and pamphlets, and music in
sheet or book form. The figures are
preliminary and are subject to such
half a minute's walk across the street.
The railroad management would
gladly keep the way clear of cars and
the city could make a nice blue dirt
walk from the train stopping place to
the exhibit for a few dollars.
Stops for train repairs longer than
the regular time are of frequent oc
currence. It is 250 miles to a repair
either east or west, and breaks are
constantly occurring in so long a di
vision. At any rate, the trains stop
regularly for 12 and 14 minutes and
with some literature and views on
hand to supplement the exhibit a
great deal of valuable advertising
could be had for very little cost.
Passengers on the Overland trains
see nothing of the Yuma project thru
the maps which show the railroad
passing through it. They see a wild
desert east of Yuma and the half-wild
Indian reservation to the westward.
A bad impression is created by what
they see.
This might be reversed if they were
shown what grows on the irrigated
land only a few hundred yards away
just out of view if only a little
effort were put forth.
SHOULD THE 60VE1
lEIT TELL RAIL
ROAD MM II'
(Continued on Page Three)
subject, all the pretense in which
congresses past and present have eng
gaged, is laid bare. We have no arbi
tration except in controversies whose
results are so doubtful that both par
ties are unwilling to risk a fight.
When either believes it can win by
force, it will not consent to arbitra
tion. A few years ago the railway com
panies resisted just as bitterly as Mr.
Lee does now, the government's at
tempt to regulate their affairs. They
held that their property was private
property, to do with as they pleased.
The government held that their man
agement of their private property was
a matter of public concern. It pro
ceeded then to regulate the manage
ment. It fixed rates, it established
accounting systems; it prescribed
certain things for the railways to do
with their property and prescribed
other things that could not be done.
For the failure to do the things or
dered to be done, the railways could
plead only acts of God, the acts of
strikers and accidents. The railways
had beacme a quasi-public service,
more severely regulated even than the
public service.
SHOWS
AND PUBLISHING
change and correction as may become
necessary upon further examination of
the original reports.
j According to the census classifica
tion the printing and publishing in-
' dustry is made up of three branches,
comprising: (l; establishments
whose chief business is book and job
printing, book printing and publish-,
ing or book publishing only; (2) es
tablishments whose sole or chief busi
ness is music printing, or music print
ing and publishing, or music publish
ing only; and (3) establishments
which are engaged in the printing
and publishing, or in the publishing
onfy, of newspapers and periodicals,
some of the first named doing job
work also.
The number of establishments in
this industry in 1914 aggregated 31,
612, and the total value of their prod
ucts amounted to $810,508,111.
Acts of God and accidents cannot
be provided against by the railroads
or the government, but most frequent
derangement of this quasi-public ser
vice can be provided against by an
application of regulations to the em
ploye as well as to the employer. It
is recognized now that only one side
of the railroad business is being regu
lated. Until the other side is brought
under the same authority the regula
tion will not be complete and the
most likely cause of loss and incon
venience to the public will remain.
As the railroads perform a quasi
public service, a service, in fact,
which brings them into closer relation
to the public than any public service,
every precaution should be taken
against interferences with it. Every
man connected with the service from
railroad president to brakeman now
! should be held responsible to the gov
ernment for any act which may inter
fere with the service.
Not only would such an arrange
ment protect the public for which all
regulation of the railways is alone
intended, but it would protect the
really aggrieved party in any contro
versy that might arise between the
railway companies and their em
ployes. It would be determined then
which was in the wrong and the
wrong would be righted, without loss
to either.
It would involve no "slavery." It
would take away no privilege that
any man in this country ought to
have. The privilege of committing
an act injurious to one's self or to
society is a privilege which should
be taken away7
3DNFERENCE TO SOLVE
CROP MARKETING PROBLEM
CHICAGO, Sept. 1. Plans to check
the annual billion-dollar waste in the
marketing of farm products, and a
comprehensive program in rural
credits, beyond the present scope and
powers of the farm loan board, will
be the chief work of the Fourth Na
tional conference on Marketing and
Farm Credits, called today, to meet
in Chicago December 4-9.
The marketing section of the con
ference will take practical and imme
diate steps to rectify certain abuses
in marketing, and to tighten up the
loose methods now prevailing in the
handling of the chief crops of the
nation It is expected that the crops
considered will be livestock, cotton,
grain, hay and whole milk and its
products Hearings will be held to
develop the movement of these crops
and the conditions surrounding their
handling.
I
Eight ministers are '"rookies" at
Plattsburgh raining camp. Almost
enough to form that church militant
we hear about now and then.
YUMA LODGES
When and Where They Meet
EAGLES Yuma Adrle, No. 898, fm
ternal Order of Eagles, meeta erer?
Thursday night at Eagles' halL AS
viaiting brothers in good standing
are cordially invited to attend.
W. C. DOUGHERTY, W. P
CHAS. W. THOMAS, Sec
MASONS Yuma Lodge, No. 17, P.
A. M., stated meetings second Thurs
day at 7:30 P. M., in each month at
Masonic HalL Special meettnit
when called.
O. C. JOHNSON, W. M.
GHAS. M. SMITH, Sec
ODD FELLOWS Anniversary Lodae,
No. 21, meets at Eagles' Hall every
Friday night Visiting; brethren are
cordially invited..
HENRY LA BATT, N. O.
A. E. McBEATH, Sec.
ELKS Benevolent and Protective Or
der of Elks, Yuma Lodge, No. 47
meets every Wednesday at the
Elks' hall at 8p. m. Visiting brotfc.
ers cordially Invited.
F. S. MING, E. R.
J. . 8T1LLS0N, Sec
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS Yum
Council No. 1806, meets first and
third Tuesdays of each month at
8 p. m.
A. L. VERUGO, Grand Knight
. I. L. MOLINA, Rec. Sec'y.
O. C. JOHNSON
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Motor and Horse-drawn
Equipment
M. MOSER
VETERINARY SURGEON
Office at MoseVs' Stables 'Phone 36-W
Night 'Phone 75-W
OOOOOOOOOOOO
0 Yuma Meat Market O
0 Best Meats O
0 E. and F. Hodges O
0 Phone 123-W 0
OOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
O DO YOU O
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Believe in national preparedness and
then fail to keep yourself physical
ly fit?
Wash your face carefully and then
use a common roller towel?
Go to the drug store to buy a tooth
brush, and then handle the entire
stock to see if the bristles are all
right?
Swat the fly and then maintain a pile
of garbage in the back yard?
For Sale at E. F. Sanguinetti
1MSW ft
m It goes further than t
H any other coffee.
Costs less per cup.
Mosi
IwS economical
lilifSl can 1
mm w-1
Grocery Department

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