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Arizona sentinel. [volume] (Yuma, Ariz.) 1916-1918, January 24, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060878/1918-01-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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5 LATEST MARKET REPORT
S FURNISHED BY
g E. F. SANGUINETTI g
Cotton 28 c
Milo Maze, ton $54.00
Fetereta, ton $54.00
Alfalfa hay, ton ?25.G0
Barley, ton $57.50
g Wheat, ton ; $62.50
VOLUME 48.
QTh w htt n TT 1
FEARLESS CHAMPION OF CITY OF YUMA, YUMA PROJECT
AND YUMA COUNTY
YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY. JANUARY 24, 1918.
I
O-
-o-
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-o
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5 LATEST MARKET REPORT 8
FURNI8HED BY
, J."' M. BA'tsZ 5
C.nttlo r 9ia V
- wi; w u 72
Hogs 8c to 12tc
Lambs 16c
Turkeys 30c
Chicks 20c
Eggs ' 55c
NUMBER 4.
i
U
to
Attorney Phil D. Swing, Representing Imperial Irrigation
District Directors, Held Half-Day Conference With
Governors and Attorney Molloy in Effort to Reach an
Agreement, But Wanted To Hog Everything.
It is indeed a cold day when Imperial Valley is not look
ing for the best, of any bargain that it may enter Into with
Yuma Project. This was never so well illustrated as on last
Saturday when Attorney Phil D. Swing was in Yuma for the
ostensible purpose of entering into an agreement with Yuma
Project people relative to the proposed connection of Impe
rial Valley with Yuma Project at Laguna dam.
Mr, Swing at the very beginning of his visit said that he
came over here "to lay our cards on the table, face up," as he
put it. He also assured his hearers that Imperial Valley
wanted nothing so much as to work in perfect harmony with
the people of Yuma Project. That sounded awfully good,
and he was met with open arms and everything seemed as
lovely as the proverbial rose that blossoms in the spring
time. Because of the unusually short time that elapsed be
eween the time of his announced coming and his actual ar
rival, less than 12 house, it was impossible to get a full meet
ing of the board of governors of the Water Users' Associa
tion. However, Governors Winsor, Schutz and Gilmer me.
with Attorney Swing in Attorney Thos. D. Molloy's offic.
with the editor of the Sentinel as a careful and painstakinc
listener to all that was developed at the meeting. The infor
mal discussion lasted from 2 p. m. to 5:30 p. m. To all intents
and purposes it might as well not have been held.
When Attorney Swing "laid his cards on the table" it
was found that they amounted to just this : Imperial Valle;
demands the earth and the fullness thereof. Not only that,
but Imperial Valley proposes to have all she wants, or know
the reason why.
First Imperial Valley has appointed a committee, con
sisting of President Leroy Holt of the Imperial directors,
Attorney Phil D. Swing and Consulting Engineer Grunsky
to go to Washington and urge a contract that will give Imperial-Valley
all she demands.
Second This contract will provide that Yuma Project
shall have no priority to its claimJor 1700 cubic feet of water
pe.r second.
Third If the contract to connect Imperial Valley with
Yuma Project at Laguna dam is entered into Imperial Valley
insists that the. power developed from the enlarged cana;
shall go to Imperial Valley, conceding, however, that Yuma
can claim ONE-SIXTH of such power to develop the lands
of "our beloved Yuma mesa."
The meeting did not break up in a free-for-all fight, for
Mr. Swing's propositions were too ludicrous to fight over.
Otherwise there might have been a regular "monkey-parrot
time," for there wasn't a man present who would concede
either of Mr. Swing's contentions. His agreement to pay
$1,600,000 for connection with our project at Laguna damj
was the only thing all hands were agreed upon, but even thi
proposition seemed to cast a doubt on Yuma Project's rig',
to receive credit for the payment. However, I am not at al
alarmed ovr this, for it has been held time and time agai:
tl at Yuma Project will be duly credited with this paymer
when it is made. It is exactly as though the project had sol
some of its equipment the project is credited with the pre
ceeds of the sale. It will be so with any amount that ma L
received for the diversion of water at Laguna dam. We ar
Limply selling so much of our interest in the dam and will b j
duly credited with all money received from such sale. Tha
is absolutely certain. j
But Mr. Swing's contention that Yuma shall have n?j
priority claim for water diverted at Laguna dam is too ridic '
ulous to consider for a moment. That contention can be dis-1
missed without argument, for no sane man on Yuma Project!
would dare give away his birthright for a mess of pottage
(Continued on Page Four)
FORMERLY OF YUMA, RUT NOW OF ELE
PHANT BUTTE-EL PASO PROJECT
HAS GENEROUSLY DONATED HIS
Big Cadillac
i our
Ca
TO THE
IT IS NOW BEING RAFFLED OFF AT
0 JL
Three thousand tickets have been issued. As many
of, these will be sold as can be, between now and
At which time the drawing will take place in the
TO
All tickets that are not sold up to that hour will
be destroyed, leaving the actual number of tickets
tor the drawing to consist of the number that have
been sold.
Every cent of the proceeds of sale of tickets will
go to the
thspier
of the Red Cross
Mr. Lawson's generosity is greatly appreciated
Dy those having the matter in charge.
Show your personal appreciation for the gener
ous gift and your loyalty to the Red Cross by pur
chasing as many tickets as you can afford to buy.
The Cadillac car is worth $1000 just as it stands. It
cost much more.
TICKETS ARE FOR SALE AT PRACTICALLY
EVERY STORE IN YUMA. BUY YOUR TICKET
WITHOUT DELAY AND HELP ALONG
'OUR BELOVED YUMA MESA" NOW IN THE LIME
LIGHT SPECIAL COMMISSION HAS MDE
FULL INVESTIGATION OF DETAILED
SURVEY AND ESTIMATE OF COSTS.
The special commission sent here under direction of Di
rector Davis of the Reclamation Service to investigate the
proposed plans and estimate of costs of reclaiming "our be
loved Yuma mesa" has come and gone. This commission
was headed by none other than Chief of Construction F. E.
Weymouth, with Consulting Engineer D. C. Henny as his
able and painstaking associate, vith Project Manager
Schlecht as the man to furnish all detailed information, who
in turn was ably assisted by the special engineer for the
Mesa, J. G. Marzel, and S. A. McWilliams. The first two
named have finished their investigation and have returned
to Denver, from which point they submit their report and
i ecommendations to the Reclamation Commission at Wash
ington, who in turn will make their report to Secretary of
Interior Franklyn K. Lane, who is expected to act in accord
with the Reclamation Commission's recommendation rela
tive to opening up the mesa.
Chief Weymouth and Mr. Henny were in Yuma over a
week. During this time they carefully and fully investigat
ed the drainage problem for Yuma Valley, as more fully set
forth elsewhere in this issue. Then they begun their care
ful and painstaking investigation as to the feasability of
constructing irrigation works for "our belovedunia mesa."
Project Manager Schlecht and Engineer Marzel had left
nothing undone. Their maps, charts and figures were as
complete as human hands could make" them; their estimates
of costs, as well as detailed explanation of every kind of
material that is to be used in the construction works, were
put down in plain figures, so Chief Weymouth arid Consult
ing Engineer Henny could check them up and compute for
themselves as to whether or not the works could be con
structed within the estimates made- by the local reclamation
forces. Just what definite conclusion was arrived at can
not be stated, for this conclusion must first be submitted to
Director Davis and then to Secretary Lane before it can
be given publicity.
There are several things to be taken into consideration
i elative to the immediate reclamation of the mesa lands. One
of these is the present war. At first glance it would seem
that this is an almost insurmountable objection to the open
ing up of the mesa at this particular time. Five million of
fighting men must be sent to the front in this great war,
and almost as many-more must be held in reserve to keep our
ranks filled to the proper quota. It would seem that it will
tax our greatest ingenuity to keep this tremendous force in
foodstuff and munitions of war, and for that reason, at first
sight, it would appear inadvisable to begin the construction
of additional reclamation projects, when it is weir known
lhat reclamation funds are already exhausted.
This contention can be easily discounted vith the
knowledge that when put in cultivation "our beloved Yuma
mesa" will furnish foodstuff and cotton in a quantity more
than sufficient to offset any expense that may be under
gone in reclaiming those unsurpassed lands. The tremen
dous drain on the wealth of the country in supporting the
various issues of liberty loan bonds must be met by' the bone
and sinew of the nation by those who can earn their liv
ing by the sweat of their brow. In no other part of the
world can this be earned with less effort than by the recla
mation of the mesa lands. There isn't a day in the year
ttiat foodstuff cannot be grown on these mesa lands. It is
perpetual springtime there all the year round, so far as a
'growing season" is concerried. Two crops 'of grain can be
grown there every year, and cotton will grow there all1 the
year round. From an economical standpoint, therefore, it
would seem a most alluring proposition to put the mesa lands
(Continued on Page Three)

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