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Tombstone epitaph. (Tombstone, Ariz.) 1887-current, September 10, 1887, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060905/1887-09-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. IX.
TOMBSTONE, AEIZONA, SEPTEMBER 10, 1887.
NO. 6.
THE POSSE'S RETURN.
Arrival of Sheriff Mulvenon and
Deputies.
(From the Prcscott Cou.icr.)
It was with a sense of great relief to
the community, when on Friday night,
news was received announcing the safe
ty of Sheriff Mulvenon and his party.
The conflicting reports concerning the
Tonto Basin trouble, and the subsequent
reported fight between the parties for
whom warrants were issued and the.
sheriff's party, in which it was said Mul
venon and several of his deputies had
been killed, had worked up an excitement
that was felt through the entire country,
and while not altogether believing that
such a calamity as rumored had befallen
the brave officers, it was tSfclcnt fliat a
fight of some kind had taken place, but
these rumors, circulated no one knows
how, were happily dispelled when Sher
iff Mulvenon telegraphed frem the Verde
Friday night that he and his party were
safe, and would be in Prescott the follow
ing night.
Saturday evening Sheriff Mulvenon
and Deputies Hicky and Tackitt arrived
in town, looking a liule worn and bronz
ed from the exposures and hardships of
the trip, but with a "whole hide." Short
ly after their arrival Sheriff Mulvenon
was waited upon by a representative of
the Courier and the following particulars
were learned:
The Prescott party, consisting of Sher
iff Mulvenon nd deputies Hicky and
Tackitt left here on Sunday the 19th
ult., with warrants for the arrcjv' of the
Tewksbury boys charging them with the
murder of John Pain and Hamilton Ble
vins. On the following Wednesday the
posse was met at Payson, by a party of
six from Flagstaff, and together they
proceeded to the Tewksbury ranch in
Pleasant valley, but found no one at
home except old man Tewksbury and the
wife of John Tewksbury,the boys having
escaped to the mountains. The old man
was questioned as to the whereabouts of
the boys and Ihe causes which led to the
killingjof Blevins and Paine, but nothing
could be elicited from him. The New
ton ranch, where the killing was done,
was the next visited, where were found
the graves of the men who had been
killed. The ranch presented a complete
state of devastation, the house and barn
having been burned to the ground, pre
sumedly by the Graham party, who had
gone for the estimable purpose of bury
' ing their dead comrades. Outside of a
few chickens and a hog, not a living thing
was seen around the place. Inquiry
from parties in the valley developed the
fact that the Tewksbury party, number
ing sixteen, were in the mountains east of
the valley. After an ineffectual search
of several days to locate the rendezvous
' of the Tewksbury's the hunt was
given up, and then the party returned
home.
Sheriff Mulvenon anticipated .no
trouble with the Tewksburys, and thinks,
had he run across them, they would
have given themselves up without a
word.
Tne valley, he says, is in a great state
of excitement, and but little is neccessay
to urge on a fight that would result in
the killing of scores of men. The op
posing factions consist of hard, determin
ed men, and both claim to be in the right,
and should they come together a terrible
fight will ensue.
Of the killing of Bill Graham, Sheriff
Mulvenon expresses the belief that Gra
ham and one of the Tewksburys met on
the trail, and in the fight that followed
Graham was killed. The wounds, also,
on Graham's body bore out this conjec
ture. Public opinion throughout the basin
generally upholds the Tewksburys, and
of their hiding from the authorities it is
only done for the purpose of safety to
themselves until the excitement dies
out.
The Graham b oys were not seen by
the officers, but they offered, through an
emissary, to assist the posse in the search
for the Tewksburys, but the offer was de
clined. It is probable that during the coming
week a posse consisting of officers from
Yavapai, Apache, and Gila counties, will
be sent out and an attempt made to dis
lodge the Tewksbury party from the ir
stronghold.
Warrants have also been issued from
. Apache county for the arrest of a num
ber of the Graham crowd for depredations
committed in that county, and it is prob
able that a number will also be issued by
the Yavipai anthorities for their partici
pation in the burning of the Newton
ranch.
The Trinidad Mines.
The English company which not very
long-ago bought the Trinidad and Sil
ver Queen.mines, in Mexico, for $1,500,
000, does not seem to be making much of
a showing. The accounts show that they
have spent $130,000 in getting out $26,
000 worth of silver. Mr. J. T. Browne,
who sold the mine to the company,
guaranteed 20 per cent dividend for five
years. After taking 50,000 shares as
part of the purchase money, he left the
other 50,000 i 1 hi hands of the direct
ors as security for the dividend. Then
Browne sold his 50,000 shares about par,
and statements were made by the brok
ers which have been proved incorrect
and for which the company were net re
sponsible. The directors are hauling Mr.
Browne over the coals just now. He pre
dicted dividends, and they now find they
underestimated expenses and had over
estimated the production. He has no
money, so the company cannot touch
him.
Mr. Stanley, a shareholder, has lately
been to the mine? and gives no flatteiing
account of affairs there. The drought in
Mexico has been a great d-awback.
There is no bonanza or rich ore body in
sight, though there is a quantity of ore in
the mine that will pay to work. The mine
is, however, in debt.
Mr. Browne, .was ptyent tthe meet
ing in London", and lie defended his
course, saying that the unexpected
drought had upset all of his calculations.
He thinks the mine is valuable and will
pay.
Judging, however, from the general
tone of the meeting, as reported in the
English papers, it looks as if this com
pany would have been wise not to have
taken these mines. It was considered
that the question of Mr. Browne's title
was a serious one, and the shareholders
have appointed a committee of consulta
tion with the directors to see what
can be done to get the company on
a better basis. At all events they do
not want Mr. Browne to start for
Mexico untillthey have a better under
standing. Mining and Scientific Press.
Rodeos.
THE SANTA CRUZ.
The S.anta Cruz rodeo will commence
at the Stone House on the Sonora line,
on the 10th of October, and work down
the banta Cruz via Calabasas and Tubac
to San Xavier.
Each owner will control his ov, a rodeo
on his own range.
Non-members will be charged one
dollar per day for board and privileges,
and will be subject to the orders of
the rodeo captain or the foreman in
charge.
Cattle owners sending vaqueros to
neighboring ranges will send credentials
to insure courtesies.
THE SAN PEDRO.
The upper San Pedro rodeo will com
mence at Palominas on the line of So
nora and the United States, on the 25th
of September, and will work down the
river to Charleston, then cross over to
Ash canyon and then follow along the
eastern slope of the Huachucas past
Fort Huachuca to the head of the Bab
ecomari, then follow down the Baboco
mari to its junction with the San Pedro,
and continuing down the San Pedro to
Benson.
Each owner will control the rodeo on
his own range.
Non-members will be charged one
dollar per day for board and the privil
eges, .and will be subject to the orders
of the rodeo captain or the foreman in
charge.
Cattle owners sending vaqueros to
neighboring ranges will send credentials
to insure courtesies.
WILCOX.
The Southern Live Stock Association
rodeo-north of the railroad will commence
October 1st at Wilcox.
Non-members will be charged one
dollar per day for board and privil
eges, and will be subject to the orders
of the rodeo captain or the foreman in
charge.
Cattle owners sending vaqueros to
neighboring ranges will send credentials
to insure courtesies.
LWER SAN PEDRO.
The lower San Pedro rodeo will com
mence October 20th, thirty six miles
north of Benson, at the ranch of Anto
nia Sosa, and work south to the rail
road. Non-members will be charged one
dollar per day for hoard and privil
eges, and will be subject to the orders
of the rodeo captain or foreman on the
range .
Cattle owners sending vaqueros to
neighboring ranges will send credentials
in insure courtesies.
SULniER SPRING VALLEY.
The lower Sulpher Spiiug valley rodeo
will commence south of the railroad at
Brannick Riggs ranch September 19th
and work south.
"Wait Till thi Olouda Roll By."
The drouth continuing in the corn
growing states of the northwest will cer
tainly make the corn crop veiy short.
There is very little hay and the run of
local cattle into the Chicago market con
tinues, This seems to argue better prices
later on and a very considerable advance
for next year. All prognostications have
of late proven false, but it remains true
that when the tide has made its run out
it must come in again. What is true in
nature is true to a certain extent in trade.
Cattle values will come up again and
reach the highest point attained in
the past. The only problem is how to
wait. The stayer is the man who will
get there in good shape. Cheyenne
Journal.
A SALTED MINE.
"Verdenal's" Account of How "Dia
mond Joe" Was Taken In. .
(From the San Francisco Chronicle.)
The Pacific coast mine operators are
discussing with considerable interest the
latest reported "salt" operation in con
nection with the sale of an Arizona mine.
It was a nefarious success, and the victim
was "Diamond Joe" Reynolds, a well
known character residing east of the
Rocky mountains, who had acquired a
fortune by various successful specula
tions. Somehow or other Joe caught
the mine fever and had it bad. He felt
that he couldn't die happy unless he own
ed a gold-mine that he might leave as a
legacy to his family. Its yearly dividends
should keep the wolf away from their
door when he would be dancing with the
angels in the spirit land. The fever has
left him now, but his experience has cost
him nearly $100,000, which is a pretty
round doctor's bill even when a radical
cure is effected. "Diamond Joe" heard
a great deal about Arizona mines in gen
eral, and particularly, but in a quiet way,
about a mine that was located within easy
enough reaching distance of Prescott,
which I shall call the "Annie Moore" for
short. The "Annie" was closely held
by three adventurous miners who, taking
their lives in their hands during an
Apache raid, continued their prospecting
until a shaft had attaiaed goodly depth
and an adit level had proved beyond
reasonable doubt sufficient ore "in sight"
to justify value. The ledge was gold
bearing, not very wide, but yielded $40
to the ton, good, bad and indifferent, and
that was not to be sneezed at. They
"proved" their mine by the aid of a jeik
water two-stamp mill, and report credit
ed them with periodical visits to Prescott
where they disposed of the product.
That was the kind of a mine Joe wanted
and he went for it. The upset price was
56o,ooo for the plant, but one of the par
ties, holding a one-third interest, was
averse to selling and had to be coaxed
into consenting to the "give away" of the
property as he called it. Joe took an
"expert" down with him, and it was
agreed thatif the assays were satisfactory
the bargain was a "go."
The samples were taken, sealed, and
carried by Joe and two of the partners to
Prescott. Lol and behold! the assayer
could only find $4.32 in gold per ton, with
a trace of silver! That was a set-back,
and the partners were dumb with amaze
ment. They gradually found speech, and
convinced Joe that their reluctant part
ner had "fixed" the samples. "Tell you
what we'll do," said the honest partners;
"we are sure that something is wrong.
You go back with your expert to the
mine, take out ten, twenty, thirty or fifty
tons and make a working test; run the
ore through the mill; we will stay here;
if the ore doesn't go what we say, we'll
pay all of your expenses; if the mill re
turns are satisfactory, then you pay us
$75,000." Joe hankered after a mine, and
answered, "It's a whack." The papers
were duly signed, money deposited in the
Prescott National Bank, and Joe went
back to the mine. The run kept the mill
busy for two weeks; the amalgam was
retorted, and the product of twenty tons
yielded an average of $41.70 per ton!
Joe bought the mine without more ado;
the partners divided according to their
respective interests and left for "the
states" to have a good time. Joe mon
opolized the Prescott office wire, tele
graphing Chambers & Frazer for a new
ten-stamp mill to be sent out instanter.
Then he sent for a force of men to take
out ore and keep the baby mill running.
He had to send a new engineer, because
the old one (who had run through the
twenty tons, by the way) quit on short
notice. How many dividend dreams af
fected Toe's slumbers is not known. He
went back on pressing advices from his
foreman that something was wrong. The
"clean up" showed very hungry ore, only
about $3 per ton. Another mill man was
sent for, but he declared upon seeing
the ore that you might as well try to
squeeze blood out of a turnip as to make
that stuff pay. A run proved the fact
that Joe had be en cleverly salted. If he
htd had his own engineer to run the mill
it couldn't possibly have happened. The
order for the new mill was countermand
ed . Joe made a bonfire of everything
combustible on the place, and has sworn
off being a mine owner. Moral: always
be sure of your engineer.
The children are getting more preco
cious every day. On returning home from
his office Colonel Yerger found his ten-year-old
boy Tommy in the frent yard
playing marbles with a strange boy of
about his own age. "Bill," said Tommy,
"Allow me to introduce you to my father.
You two gentlemen ought to know each
other." Texas Siftings.
To the Public
Having purchased the entire interest of
Jos. Pascholy in he undertaking busi
ness in this city, I will hereafter devote
my especial attention to said business.
Embalming and the preparing of bodies
for removal a specialty. Orders filled
in any part of the county.
A, J. R'TTER,
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
WILLIAM HERRING. HOWARD F. HERRING.
HERRING & HERRING,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT
Law, Toughnut street, Tombstone, Ariz.
W. H. STILWELL,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, Fourth street. Tombstone, A, T.
ALLEN R, ENGLISH,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, up stairs in County Court House,
Tombstone, A. T.
JOHN C. EASTON,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. NOTARY
Public and Conveyancer. Office in Occi
dental Hotel, Allen street. Tombstone, A. T.
HENRY G. HWE,
UNITED STATES DEPUTY MINERAL
Surveyor. Tombstone, Arizona. Member
of the American Institute of Mining Engineers.
Attention given to the care of mines for non
resident owners and corporations, f he best of
reference given. Correspondence solicited.
W. D. SHEARER,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. OFFICE
on Fourth street, opposite Occidental Hotel.
Tombstone, A. T.
T. YOKTGB,
Druggist,
ALLEN STREET,
Between Fourth and Fifth Sts.
Patent Medicines, Per
fumeries, Toilet
Articles
PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY PRE
PARED. Brown "You seem to be very good natured,
Smith; what has happened?"
Smith "I have been sending away for boots
and shoes for years, and I find I can buy a bet
ter article for less money of J . M. Leary, right
here at home. His store is on Allen street, be
tween Fifth and Sixth, north side. Give him a
call and make yourself happy as well"
MAISON DOREE
R.OTISSERI,
409 ALLEN STREET,
(Between Fourth and Fifth.)
THE ONLY FIRST-CLASS
Faily RestanranT
IN THF CITY.
FINE LADIES' PARLORS.
SHELL & CANNED OYSTERS
Always on Hand.
ABMAND TCTOUET. Proprietor.
BILLIARD PARLORS
ALLEN STREET,
HAFFNER & SHAUGHNESSY.
All brands of
Fine Liquors
Fine Liquors
Kept constantly
On hand,
On Hand,
Also the best
Imported cigars.
Imported Cigars.
The best BILLIALD HALL in the city in
connection with the saloon.
ST. LOUIS BEER ON DRAGHT.
Drugs
ana Cbuica s
Zj( ifpf 6 shoe;
TWEED'S STORE
OUR MOTTO:
Live & Let Live.
llWHHftP
Corner Allen and Fourth Streets),
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
Ms for tiie People
H. K. Tweed desires to call the attention of the Tombstone
public to his immense and varied stock of
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Which he is now offering at prices that place the goods within
the reach of everyone.
All Eastern Goods purchased direct in the East, not
second hand through California firms.
Among the thousand and one articles which fill this
mammoth store will be found
FAMILY GROCERIES
Of every description. Finest California canned goods. Eu
ropean and California dried fruit Table delicacies. Choice
coffee roasted and ground on the premises. Colgate's toile
and other well known brands of soap.
Clothing and Furnishing Goods
Of which a large assortment of both Eastern and California
goods will be found at very moderate prices.
The latest styles of everything in these lines cheaper than
you can purchase in San Francisco.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Of choice imported and California brands by the cask, bot
tie or gallon. Finest American and imported liquors. High
grade cigars, tobaccos and cigarettes.
Also a full assortment of staple articles ol
And everything usually kept in a first-class General Mer
chandise Establishment.
Most Complete Stock
No old goods. Everything fresh and' new. Before you
make your purchases take a walk through
TWEED'S STORE
Cor. of AUei?. and Fourth Sts,
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
GOOD GOODS
At Low Prices
at Popular Prices!
of Goods in Arizona.
BANK
-OF-
TOMBSTONE
CAPITAL 8100,000.
TOMBSTONE, A IZ0NA:
GE6RGE BERROTT - - . President
GEO. H. CARREL . - - tVice-President.
R. W.WOOD Cashier,
.WILL TRANSACT A GENERAL
KING BUSINESS, EXCHANGE,, RECEIVE BE
POCITi C3UECTI0NS, ETC.
L. M. JACOBS,
President.
A. E. JACOBS.
Cashier.
ise County M
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
Transacts a General Banking, Exchange and
Collection Business.
Especial attention given to all Business of Cor
respondents and their interests
carefully served
Prompt attention guaranteed to all business
entrusted to our care
Foreign and Domestic Enchange
Bought and Sold.
G. w. swain,
Attorney-at-Law and Notary Public
Office: 113 Fourth Street.
0 K CORRAL,
uvery & Feed Stable
3 TRANSIENT STOCK WELL CARED t03
l Uood variety of Buggies, Carriages and
agons, with teams to match. Eleven-passenger
excutslon coach, suitable for plcnlesi other
parties. Orders sent by mall or telegraph for
outfits will be promptly attended to.
John Montgomery Proprietor.
FRANK G. CARLE,
Assay & Metallurgical Laboratory
Office: 319 Fremont Street,
Opposite City Hall.
J. V. VICKERS,
FREMONT STREET,
Eeal Estate,
Mines, Money,
and Insurance.
REAL ESTATE Bought, Sold and Rented.
COLLECTIONS Made, Taxes Paid, eta,
MONEY Loins Negotiated and Investments
made.
INSURANCE Fire, Accident and Life.
MINESr-Bought and Sold.
NOTARY PUBLIC.
TOMBSTONE
F0UIDKY
AND-
MACHINE SHOP.
MCALLISTER & McCONE. Prop's.
All Kinds of Mill and Mining Machinery,
Heavy and Light Castings of Iron and Brass
Made to Order on Short Notice. Stamps, Pans,
Settler, Ketorts, Cages, Cars, Skeets, Balling
Tanks, Etc., from Latest Designs, PorUblo
Hoisting Engines, 2-Stamp Prospectors' Mills
Made to Order. Screens of all Descriptions
Punched or lotted. Engines Indicated and Ad
justed. Agents for Albany Lubricating Com
pounds. Cylinder, Spindle and Yalre oils, West
lnghouse Automatic Engines from 2 to 200
Horse Power and all clso in the Machine and
Foundry Line. Also
AGENTS FOR THE
LAFELLE TURBINE
WATER WHEEL.
JAMES P. MCALLISTER, Manager.
324 Fremont St.. Tombstone.
STAPLE ana FANCY QKOUERIBS. Choices
Urands of Kentucky Whisky, and grain of al
kinds kept constantly on hand and sola at lowes
prices.
VA nil Hat of Assaycrs' Snppllcs constantly
on hand.
FRANK B.AUHTIN Proprietor;
Notice
On and after April 1st, weekly ice tick
ets will be sold for $1 and upwards. Ice
0 weekly customers will not be delivered
without ttckets.
tf. SoVTHWESTUlN.ICE CO.
fill
Papap
Casl
tore

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