OCR Interpretation


Tombstone epitaph. (Tombstone, Ariz.) 1887-current, September 17, 1887, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060905/1887-09-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

T'TH.1 I.lA'AAIf
i aoM a mas
(IIJl .
YOL. IX.
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA, SEPTEMBER 17, 1887.
'KXX'Tr
V!--
A TOUGH CONCERN.
THE TORTILITA MINING COMPANY
A New Way to Raise the Neceuary Working
Capital for Property "Worth
Millions."
The following letter way received at
this office last week. As there is nolliing
confidential about the matter the corre
spond is laid before the readers of the
Epitaph in order to put them on their
guard against what it considers a ques
tionable concern. It may be barely pos
sible the mines are good for small ones,
though they do not bear any great repu
tation in Pinal county where they are sit
uated, but the idea of comparing them to
the Silver King or the Tombstone mines
is simply ridiculous. It is to be hoped
the press of the Territory will unite in
exposing all such concerns, for the injury
they do to legitimite mining operations
is incalculable. Whether they do or not,
the EPITAPH is prepared to do its duty
in the mailer. The following is the
letter:
Tortiuta Gold & Silver Mining Co .
5 D.oajwiy, Room 30,
New Yokk. September 3, 1887
7- )
Joseph H. Real!, President; Rodman M. Price,
jr., secretary.
Editor EPITAPH-Dear Sir: In bring
ing the attention ol the public to the
stock of thii company, I should be pleas
ed to make use of the columns of your
paper, and want to use during Sepiem
ber and October, one hundred, two hun
dred or five hundred lines of reading mat
ter, similar in character to the enclosed
from the Hartford "Post," to appear
among other original or selected matter,
separate and apart from other paid
matter, and not t bear any marks of ad
vertising matter, and I desire your low
est net price for the same, and separately
on five hundred lines advertising space;
either or all to be payable in the shares
of this company, at the present selling
frice par $2 per share, which price
will guarantee to you for one year. Or
I will pay you for the advertising Dec.
1st, in cash. I will forward stock in ad
vance, if rates are acceptable, and you
sgrce.
The company has twelve mines, two
of which are actively working, and pro
ceeds of sale of stock are to be used to
buy additional machinery to enable us to
care for the ore which awaits our taking.
It is a proven property.
Yours Truly,
TCSEPH H. RUALL.
In reply to the above the Epitaph
would sute that it does not desire to ad
vertise frauds other than to expose them,
and consequently will not accept the
proposition on any terms. The article
referrsi'tofrom the Hartford Post bears
evidence on its face of the questionable
nature of the Tortilita Mining Company.
Its secretary, Rodman M. Price, Jr., is
well known in this community, not as a
mining expert, but as a dead beat and
bilk, and it is believed that if other offi
cers of the company are as disreputable
as he is known to be, no dividends will
ever be paid even if the mines are as val
uable as the officers of the company rep
resents them. However, it is an ac
knowledged fact that valuable mines re
quire no such methods to procure work
ing capital. The following extracts from
the Post article are reproduced in
order to show the amazing gall of the
outfit:
THE PRESIDENT'S STATEMENT.
"I investigated the enterprise thor
oughly, only to find that their representa
tions were far beneath what ttie facts
would bear, and I am getting daily proofs
of trie greater value of the properly. I
determined to handle mining stock the
same as any regular commodity that is,
to sell it on its merits for wnat it was
worth, and have it free from all artificial
and gambling methods, and my plan has
woo. The public have recognized the
value of the enterprise far beyond my
expectations, and have shown their con
fidence to a greater extent than ever
shown before. I found investers ready
for an enterprise conducted on sound
business principles, and they will reap
their reward. Some of the largest and
best operators in the country pronounce
Tortilita the most valuable property of its
size they have yet seen, and it is. We
have twelve developed mines, a mill and
two mill sites, with enough ore in sight
to run ten times our present capacity for
years to come. We are now taking out
bullion daily, and will soon erect addi
tional machinery; that is what we offer
some of our stock for. We do not want
much money; the stock is good enough
lor us, and we will only sell 200,000
shares altogether and retain the other
three-fifths, leaving actually but two-fifths
on the market. When this is sold or a
large part of it, as a legitimate enterprise
it will stand second to none in the coun
try, and the stock will command a large
premium. I do not know whether stock
will pay $1 or $2 per share in dividends,
but I do know the stock is very cheap at
$2, the present price, and many believe it
will eventually sell for ten times that fig
ure. Three of the mines are now being
operated, and are demonstrated to be ex
ceptionally rich in ore and worth far
more than the entire capital stock of
the company, not counting the other
mines,"
"The Torttlitas are exciting more at
tention than any other mining property
in the Territory, and there are some rich
ones here. For example the Silver King
not fir distant has paid three million dol
lars in dividends from one mine alone,
while the Tortilita company has twelve .
The Riymart and Vikol in another di
rection have turned out millions and
made their owners rich, as have the re
nowned Tombstones and Quijotoa.
TneTortilitas are on the tongue of every
body." "It is believed that the Tortilita is the
joundest and best mining enterprise yet
brought to the attention of the public,
and that those who invent will reap hand
some returns. They aic at least
sure of a safe investment and good divi
dends." THE bUPERINlENDENr'S OPINION.
"We can easily supply three twenty
stamp mills for an indefinite period un
these properties. They would work I So
tons of ore per day, at an average of $50
per ton. At a low estimate this would be
i'9,000 per day. With the proper ma
chinery this can be worked at an expense
of $10 per ton, which would be $1,800
per day, leaving net per day $7,200, or
for thirty days $216,000, oror a year $2,
592,000, which will be over two and a
half times our capital stock each year,
but at first we shall start with a twenty-
stamp mill which should give us $800,
000 per year net, or 80 per cent p;r an
num on our capital stock, I am now
bending every effort toward attaining
these results. We are now negotiating
for a hoisting works and a forty stamp
mill and I hope soon to obtain them. I
kno of no investment in America that
will pay as well as the shares of our com
pany. I have seen all of the best mines
in America, and worked in t fir in, and I
tell you here and now that the Tortilitas
are the greatest and best of their class
on the American continent."
THE FOREMAN'S IDEA.
"I have worked on the Comstocks, I
have been in the Silver King and other
great mine, I have followed this business
all my life. This is the richest property
for its depth and development that I
have ever seen, and you can hold me re
sponsible for this statement; the Tortilitas
will prove the best mines ever discovered
on the Pacific slope. That report of Mr.
Price, the engineer and secretary of the
company, and who was down here among
us so lontr, surveying the Tombstone
and other mines, and the statements of
the Tortilita company in their prospectus
do not tell half the truth about these
mines. This one mine which I am now
working in is worth more than a million
dollars itself."
A CORRESPONDENT'S STATEMENT.
"After a week's time spent at the mines
in daily examination of the woik, in see
ing assays made, watching the battery
samples and seeing the ore retorting and
running into bullion and stamped, and
reading certificates of $150,000 for bul
lion shipped to the Bank of California in
the last two years, and seeing one bar of
2,400 ounces sent foward while I was
there, I left impressed with the fact that
that the Tortilita deserved the confidence
of the public, and that the management
in New York had far underestimated its
value in their statements. I found prop
erty worth anywhere from $10,000,000 to
$50,000,000, and possibly $100,000,000,
as the Comstocks have proven to be, and
have made thousands of men rich. I
found the Tortilita not only a great prop
erty, but one that is managed in the best
way. It has a jewel in Mr. Elmore, the
superintendent, who is as honest as he is
able, the essential thing that interests the
stockholders after the value of the prop
erty." CONCLUSION.
The shares of the Tortilita Compiny
are being taken all over the country for
investment by bankers, merchants, farm
ers, mechanics and laboring men and
women. They can only be bought now
by private subscription, and those wish
ing to purchase will do well to send in
their orders at once, as the books will
soon close preparatory to calling the
stock on the board. The shares can now
be bought at par in any sized lots from
one share to 5,000 shares direct from the
company's effice, 57 Broadway, New
York.
THE OTIICU HIDE.
The above wild exaggerations really re
quire no refutation, as they bear upon
their face to anyone having the least
knowledge of mines evidence of their
untruthfulness; but a general denial, is
usually wrthoul oTtct, and hence those
who are personally acquainted with the
property have been interviewed with ref
erence to it. The first person interviewed
was a
WELL-KNOWN MINING MAN
of this camp, who had charge of some of
its best properties, and whose judgment
and word can be depended upon. He
is a careful, reticent man, and gave his
testimony very reluctantly, positively re
fusing to have his name published
in connection with the matter. He
said:
"I visited the Owl's Head district, in
Pinal county, about four months ago, and
inspected some of the property of the
Tortilita Mining Company. My recol
lection is that the deepest shaft in the
district was not more than sixty feet, and
hence the properties there can only be
considered prospects. There were no
large bodies of ore as represented in the
article from the Hartford Post, but only
a few small stringers of quite rich ore,
which I found to be the characteristic of
the district. There was a small five
stamp mill running at the time, and it
seemed to be a quim sabe case whether
there was ore and water enough to keeD
that going. By employing men at the
low rate of $2 per day they managed to
make ends meet. Altogether there were
about twenty men employed on the dif
ferent prospects coyoting for ore, and at
the mill. My judgment is that five
stamps is about their full capacity, and
the talk of sixty stamps is the sheerest
nonsense. From a careful reading of
the different articles published in the
Eastern papers with reference to the
Tortilita Mining Company I cannot but
think that it is one of the biggest frauds
that was ever attempted to be perpetrated
upon a gullable public. I feel that we
are more or less interested In exposing
such wildcat schemes as I believe this
Tortilita to be, and yet I have the great
est delicacy in mixing up in the matter.
I do not believe that Mr. Elmore and
the men at the mine are putting up the
job, but 1 feel that the swindle was hatch
ed in New York, and is being worked up
there. Go ahead and do your duty in
exposing the concern, and you will be do
ing good work for the Territory."
A MINER AND PROSPECTOR
who is at present in this city, is thor
oughly reliable and is well posted re
gaiding the Owl's Head district. He
said:
"I have prospected in Pinal county
for seven years, and know every mining
district in it. If there is a mine deserving
the name in Owl's Head district, I don't
know it. The Tortilita Mining Company
is a fraud from top to bottom, aid there
is no doubt about it."
ANEW MEXICO VIEW.
Raton, N.'M., Range
Just now, when the time draws near
for a change for the better in this busi
ness when an organization for the sal
vation of beef profits is formulating and
must sooner or later assume shape
when all the cattle raisers of the East
ern and Middle States are disposing of
their cattle at their shambles on account
of the small profits of the business is
the time, for those who can, to "hang
and rattle" with their herd. There will
come a reaction and it will be a grand
one. It will be a change in which the
producer of beef will receive double the
present prices for his steers, and stock
cattle will be in demand. It will come
just as sure as the sun shines, and then
the men who sold when cattle were low
and considered that the cattle business
had its day, will be out behind the
barn kicking themselves for being so
blind. Man is generally an impres
sionable creature, and, aftet a few hard
knocks like cattlemen have received of
late years, yields to the belief it is
always to be thus. A change is bound to
result it is surer tean four aces in
which demand and supply will be the
controling factors. Would those who
believe otherwise havs us accept the
theory that when the population is in
creasing in such a heavy ratio, and hun
dreds of thousands of cows being year
ly thrown on the market by big com
panies and small farmers, that this will
not result in a reaction? It most assur
edly will, and those who do not accept
this as an axiom, and profit by it when
practicable, will be the men who cannot
read the signs of the times. Remember
that it is generally the darkest just be
fore dawn.
BOGUS QUARTZ.
(Mining and Scientific Press.)
The joke about the green miner who
found a "brass mine" is quite an old one;
but it is no joke for a man to buy a gold
property and then find it is a brass mine
in reality. An instance has just come to
light in this city which shows rather a
new feature in mining swindles. It is a
case where the salters not only prepared
the metal, but also prepared the rock in
which the metal was was placed.
The samples which we saw were "bo
gus quartz," carrying brass just plain,
simple brass. These "ore" samples came
from another State to a San Francisco
merchant, to whom they were sent by a
friend who wisely wanted reliable infor
mation from a California assayer. They
were taken to a metallurgist, in this city
for examination. The latter gentleman
determined that the alleged gold was
nothing but brass. The bogus quartz
appears to have been made from a kao
lined rock that is easily crushed, and
while in the plastic state was salted with
particles of brass like little nuggets of
free gold. It was afterwards dried and
broken in pieces. It falls to mud when
wet. These specimens were clearly de
signed to take in unsuspecting invest
ors. The supposed ore is white in appear
ance and show no signs of gold or other
metal on the surface. When broken and
pulverized in a mortar, and horned or
panned out, the little nuggets of brass
remain, and have the appearance of gold
and it is quite an artistic style of salt
ing. When soaked in water the specimens
fall to pieces and disclose the method of
fabrication. The brass chips upon close
examination show quite plainly the tool
marks by which they were made. The
specimens are well calculated to de
ceive some persons not familiar with the
subject.
It may be mentioned incidentally in
this connection, that what is known as
California quartz jewelry, so common in
this market and so much admired by vis
itors here, is by no means all it is repre
sented to be. Good quartz for the pur
pose became so scarce that the substance
is now manufactured. A transparant
siliceous material is prepared, which can
be made more or less clouded, and then
fl ikfs or threads of gold placed thereon
in any desired form. It looks almost
exactly like real gold quartz and is sold
as such.
The East will have to look out for its
reputation in some things, for bogus gold
ore is more difficult to make than
wooden hams and nutmegs, or shoe-peg
oats.
s 4
It would perhaps pay the sheriffs of
the different counties in Arizona, New
Mexico and Texas to forward to Deputy
Sheriff John Hovey, of Clifton, descrip
tions of the men who are "wanted" in
their various localities. Mr, Hovey says
that there are now in the vicinity of this
town and outlying districts more hard
cases and suspicious characters than for
a number of years past. The vicinity of
the Blue and Eagle rivers affords splen
did hiding places for fugitives from jus
tice, and are taken advantage of by this
class to a great extent. Clifton Clar-
RODEO LAW.
Section I. Cattle owners living in the
same geneal neighborhood can agree
upon the time, manner and place of hold
ing rodeos, but such rodeos shall be held
once in each year. When the time of
rodeos is agreed upon, notice of the same
must be posted in three public places in
the neighborhood, and at least ten days
previous to such rodeos.
Sec. 2. Cattle owners after such ro
does shall drive all the cattle belonging
to them back to the ranches in posession
of the owners of such cattle respec
ively. Sec. 3. Whenever any person turns
cattle on any range alreadyoccupied or in
possession of another he shall furnish
water on such range in addition to that
already thereon, free, unfenced and o:
the surface sufficient to water all such ad
ditional cattle.
Sec. 4. Any person violating the pro
visions of this act is guilty of a misde
meanor and punishable as provided for
the punishment of a misdemeanor by the
penal code.
Chapter 81 of the Complied Laws of
Arizona, and "an act for the protection of
stock raisers," approved Maich 7th, 1881,
are hereby repealed.
Last Thursday Col. S. P. Carpenter
purchased the Upton cattle at Sheriffs
sale. They were attached last spring,
by Texas parties, for whose account they
were sold. Col. Carpenter purchased
425 head at $9.00 per head. They were
the cheapest lot of cattle which have yet
been sold in this county. Southwest
Sentinel.
As illustrating the steady advance in
the value of grazing land in the south
west for the past year much of the land
in the Panhandle that could have been
bought for sixty and seventy cents an
acre is now selling at $1.50 and $1.75
per acre. The wholly successful cattle
man of the future will graze his cattle
within an enclosure and generally on his
own land.
Leave your order for the San Francis
co Chronicle at Sol Israel's. Price, One
month 65 cents; Six months $4; One year
$7. Payable in advance.
PR0FESS10NAL CARDS;
DR. E. C. DUNN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. OFFICE
on Fifth street, between Fremont and
Safford.
DR. W. W. FETTERMAN,
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND
Surgeon. Office corner of Sixth and Fre
mont streets, Tombstone, Arizona.
WILLIAM HERRING. HOWARD F. HCRRING.
HERRING & HERRIflG,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT
Law, Toughnut street, Tombstone, Ariz.
"W.Ti. STIbWELIfe
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, Fourth street, Tombstone, A, T.
ALLEN R. ENGLISH,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, up stairs in County Court House,
Tombstone, A. T.
JOHN C. EASTON,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, NOTARY
Public and Conveyancer. Office in Occi
dental Hotel, Allen street, Tombstone, A. T.
HENRY G. HOWE,
UNITED STATES DEPUTY MINERAL
Surveyor, Tombstone, Arizona. Member
of the American Institute of Mining Engineers.
Attention given to the care of mines lor non
resident owners and corporations. The best of
reierence given, corresponuence solicited.
AV. D. SHEARER,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. OFFICE
on Fourth street, opposite Occidental Hotel,
Tombstone, A. T.
CHAS. D. REPPY,
-VTOTARY PUBLIC, EPITAPH OFFICE,
L1 Tombstone, A. T.
Brown "You seem to be very good natured,
Smith; what has happened?"
Smith "I have been sending away for boots
and shoes for years, and I find I can buy a bet
ter article for less money of J. M. Leary, right
here at home. His store is on Allen street, be
tween Fifth and Sixth, north side. Give him a
call and make yourself happy as weH."
r "'1115 h"' FW
TWEED'S
OUR MOTTO:
Live & Let Live.
Corner Allen and Fourth Street,
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
Goods for tie People
H. K. Tweed desires to call the attention of the Tombstone
public to his immense and varied stock of
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Which he is now offering at prices that place the goods withltt
the reach of everyone.
All Eastern Goods purchased direct in the East, not
second hand through California firms.
Among the thousand and one articles which fill this
mammoth store will be found
FAMILY GROCERIES
Of every description. Finest California canned goods. Eu
ropean and California dried fruit Table delicacies. Choice
coffee roasted and ground on the premises. Colgate's toile
and other well known brands of soap.
Clothing and Furnishing Goods
Of which a large assortment of both Eastern and California
goods will be found at very moderate prices,
The latest styles of everything in these lines cheaper than
you can purchase in San Francisco.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Of choice imported and California brands by the cask, bot
tie or gallon. Finest American and imported liquors. High
grade cigars, tobaccos and cigarettes.
Also a full assr-tmcnt of staple articles oi
And everything usually kept in a first-class General Mer
chandise Establishment.
Most Complete Stock of Goods in Arizona.
No old goods. Everything fresh and new. Before you
make your purchases take a walk through
TWEED'S STORE
Cor. of Allen and Fourth Sts.
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA
STORE
JBIjSMS GOOD GOODS
llMll Low Pies
at Poplar Prices!
BANK
n JAiorrtu
rjH
-OF-
TOMBSTONE11
CAPITAL 8100,000.
TOMBSTONE, A IZONA;
GEORGE BERROTT . . PresilenL
GEO. H. CARREL - - Vice-President
R. W. WOOD Cashier,
WILL TRANSACT A GENERAL
KING BUSINESS, EXCHANCE. RECEIVE DE
POSITS COLLECTIONS, ETC.
L. M. JACOBS,
President.
A. E. JACOBS.
Cashier.
ise County Bant
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA,
Transacts a General Banking, Exchange and
Collection Business.
Especial attention given to all Business of Cor
respondents and their interests
carefully served
Prompt attention guaranteed to all business
entrusted to our care
Foreign and Domestic Enchange
Bought and Sold.
G. w. swain,
Attorney-at-Law and Notary Public-
omce: 113 Fourth Street.
0 K CORRAL,
UTB17 & Feed Stable
TRANSIENT STOCK WELL CARED tLJ
Good variety of Buggies, Carriages ana.
Wagons, with teams to match. Eleven-passenger
excuislon coach, euttablo for plcnicsi other
parlies. Orders sent by mail or telegraph for
outfits will bo promptly attended to.
John Montgomery Proprietor.
FBANK G. 1SABLE,
Assay & Metallurgical Laboratory
Office: 310 Fremont Street,
Opposite City HalL
J. V. VICKERS,
FREMONT STREET,
Beal Estate,
Mines, Money,
and Insurance.
REAL ESTATE Bought, Sold and Rented.
COLLECTIONS Made. Taes Paid, eta,
MONEY Loans Negotiated and Investm-nts
made.
INSURANCE Fire, Accident and Life.
MINES Bought and Sold.
NOTARY PUBLIC.
TOMBSTONE
F0TODKY
AND-
MACHINE SHOP.
MCALLISTER & McCONE. Prop1.
All Kindii of Mill and Mining Machinery,
IU'vy and Light Csstlncs of Iron and Brass
Hade to Outer on Short Notice. Stamps, Pass,
Settlers, It( torts. Cages, Care, Skects, Billing
Tanks, Etc., from Latest Designs. Portable
Hoisting Engines, 2 Stamp Prospectors' Mills
Made to O-der. Screens of ell Descriptions
Punched or lotted. Engines Indicated ana Ad
lusted. Ageuts 'or Albany Lubricating Com
pounds. Cylinder, Spindle and Valve oils, West
fnchonse Automatic Engines from 8 to too
Horse Power and all clso In the Machine and
Foundry Line. Also
AGENTS FOR THE
LAFELLE TURBINE
WATER WHEEL.
JAMES P. McALLISTER, Manager.
324 Fremont St.. Tombstone.
8TAfLE ana FANCY UHOUEBIB8, Choices
Brands of Kentucky Whisky, and grain of al
kinds krnit cntiAfiintlvnn html .ml iaU t tMwa
prices.
t3f"A nil line af Assayers' Supplies constantly
on hand,
FRANK B. AUSTIN ProDrietor.
Notice
On and after April 1st, weekly ice tick
ets will be sold for $1 and upwards. Ice
o weekly customers will not be delivered
without ttckets.
tf. Southwestern Ice Co.
Coco
Cash
mm
Store
r

xml | txt