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Tombstone epitaph. (Tombstone, Ariz.) 1887-current, October 15, 1887, Image 1

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VOL. IX.
TOMBSTONE, AEIZOjSTA, OCTOBER 15, 1887.
NO. 11.
THE INDIAN QUESTION
GENERAL MILES' SENSIBLE VIEWS
Large Indian Reservations Should be Broken
Up, and to that End He Recommends
the Removal of a Portion of the
San Carlos Indians to
the Vede.
In a letter dated September 20, to the
editor of the Prescott Journal-Miner,
General Miles takes what the EPITAPH
considers a very sensible position on-the
Indian qu-stion. A great howl has gone
up from the northern part of the Terri
tory over his supgestion, but among those
best poled in the matter his recommen
dations are endorsed as wiie and just.
Except some purely personamatters, the
following is General Miles' letter in full:
SAN CARLOS RESERVATION.
Iii aard to the Indians on the San
C 1 rl a reservation, their management
and placement, that is a matter of such
grave importance to all the inhabitants
til )ur (Arizona) territory as to trans
cend every individual interest and desire.
About twelve years ago, it is staled, for
reasons personal to certain interested
panic, a I irge number of Indians were
congregated nn what is known as the
S.in C.irlos reservation, viz: the San
Cttloj (already there), White Mountains,
Tonto-, Mojives and Yumas. Later the
Chincahuas were moved up from the
south and the Warm Springs were
brought from New Mexico. If the ob
ject of this procedure was not to get the
Indians off the land on which they had
lived for generations, in order to give
po-ei-ion of it to the white men, and to
mass Idtge numbers of different tribes
on one reservation ma'iily for the benefit
of agents, contractors and other inter-esf-d
p.mie?, then the statement to that
effect, boldly made and repeated, must
have been erroneous. It is a fact that
my predecessor, General Crook, protest
ed in the strongest terms against the re
moval of those Indians to the San Car
los reservation, yet regardless of that and
against reasons of humanity and pru
dence, the Indians were deceived into
being removed, by being tsld that they
were going into a healthful country with
plenty of water and grass, and finally
were forced to abandon the country
which they held dearly. The San
Carlos Indians had been living along the
San Carlos river, which is comparatively
healthy.
THE WHITE MOUNTAIN INDIANS
Soon found the region unsuited to them,
and declared they would rather die than
reamin there. They were told that un
less they would remain there they would
get no rations, and they replied that they
would go and support themselves. They
went bick to their native country in the
White Mountains, and the struggle those
Indians have been making to keep soul
and b)dy together, independent of gov
ernment assistance, is deserving of the
highest commendation. In fact, when I
was at Apiche last summer the tenor of
the men's appeal was: "Give us farming
tools and utensils plows, rakes, any
thing wnich with our hands we can make
fo d tor our families. We do not ask
lor your bread or meat we will earn
fooil ourselves if you give ui tools." I
mysrli s w Indian women go out and cut
gro.'. w th dull knives, wherever they
umld find a spot along the ravines and
sides of -he mountains, and then pack it
on their backs eighteen or twenty miles
10 Apiche and sell it to the government
contiacinr for hay. Such are the facts
concerning one band who would do till
that, ra her than stay and be fed in idle
ness by the government at San Carlos.
The Tontos, Mnjaves and Yumas have
f near been oegging agents, inspectors
and enmmitsioner, and many govern
ment officials that have visited them, to
be allowed to return to their native
country, from which they were ruthlessly
removed. And the fact that they have
been increasing very little if any in pop
ulation, while other tribes, living in a
country agreeable to them, have largely
increased in numbers and wealth, indi
cates, to say the least, that tbeirpirtof
the reservation is not healthy for them,
and while their decrease may suggest to
some minds one way to solve their
troubles, humanity and the policy of the
government proclaim against such n
process of killing off, and the peace and
prosperity of Arizona demands that the
cause of the disaffection among these
Indians be removed, otherwise their dis
content will go on augmenting, and like
a slow fuse will some day burst fourth
when kast desired. It is too well-known
that
SERIOUS DISTURBANCES
Have occurred on the reservation, and
that more have not happened is a master
of pleasant surprise to all who know the
circumstances. Recently sickness has
prevailed among them, and the agent has
reported that over 100 have died from
the whooping cough alone, doubtless as
a result of the low and weakened con
dition of their system. That they are
not altogether without some humane
feeling is proven by the fact that one of
the Indians, during the recent epidemic,
took his three little children, so emaciat
ed and weak, that he carried them in his
NWS tai on bis kitk, from his camp t
the hospital daily, for medical treatment,
carrying them back tlie same way. Is it
surprising that that Indian was one of
the number engaged in the recent out
break? That the water along the river
where they are compelled to live has a
deleterious effect is a fact beyond dis
pute. Even white people in the garri
sons at Fort Thomas, near by, with all
appliances of ollas, filters, wells, ice ma
chines, etc., suffer much from sickness
in consequence. During a recent visit
to San Carlos I found the dissatisfaction
among the Indians very great, and at one
time the
DANGER OF AN OUTBREAK
was most serious. Between one thousand
and twelve hundred Indians left their
camp and congregated on the,, western
borders of the 'reservation, niid for a
while matters lp. ked most serious and
threatening for the people of Arizona.
It was with the vie of avoiding trouble
and for the peace of jour territory that
I recommended that authority be
eiven for such disposition of those
Indians as the peace of the commun
ity, and justice as well, seemed to de
mand. In this connection I might remark
that, if there is one thing about which
the
PRESS AND THE TEOPLE OF ARIZONA
have been most un mimous, it is the re
moval of the Indians from the San Car
los reservation, but it is possible that
some people have not fully considered
that question. There are about 50CO
Indians on that reserve, and at I-ast
1000 cipable of bearing arms. If it
were possible to surround that body of
Indians, catierd over 100 miles noith
and south, and 50 miles eist and west,
and round them up under guard, to what
point may I ask you to remove them?
You certainly could not remove them to
Colorado, California or New Mexico, for
the people of those States and that Ter
ritoiy have enough ol their own to look
after, and want no more. Nor could you
remove them to Ttxis or Kansas, and
there is a positive law ol Congress pro
hibiting them sent to Indian Territory.
In my opinion a good beginning would
have been made to separate the camps
as far as practicable, and in such a way
as would not only benefit the Indians,
but give better security to the white
people, for it is much easier to control a
small band than a lare one.
THE WISDOM OF SUCH A COURSE
is illustrated by the peaceful, industrous
and progressive condition of the Punas,
Papagoes and Mancopas, situated in
detached camps, as now proposed for
the San Carlos Indians. It was not
recommended that theyshouldoccupy any
land owned by any white people, or
even that the land that was formerly
theirs by sacred treaty and of which they
were dispossessed, should be restored
to them, but they should be placed on
unoccupied government land, and
surely the Government has the undis
puted right to place and hold its wards
on any military or Indian reservations
where they can bs best controlled and
most easily and economically supplied
and cared for. As the reservation at
Verde is no longer required for military
purposes, good use could be made of it
by placing some of the Indians there,
but
IT WAS NEVER INTENDED
to place a thousand or twelve hundred
there, as stated in your article. Others
could be put on the west side of the
Colorado river, and a few sent to Mc
Dowell, Mohave and Yuma where they
desire to go, and no harm would be done
any one. In fact, the conversion of
military posts no longer required into
industrial schools, has been found practi
cable .and advisible. Again, it is much
more economical to keep troops at Verde
and Whipple Barracks, where they
would be needed if this change were
made, then foi the government to build
a military post at a cost of perhaps
$100,000, as it nny have to do on the
west side of the ban Carlos reserva
tion, strengthen the garrisons at Forts
Thomas and Apache, and withdraw the
garrisons from Whipple Barracks and
Verde.
But aside from all this, there is
ONE CONSI DERATION
that appears to have been lost bight of
entirely, viz: the present policy and
puipose of the government to break up
laige Indian reservations which lend to
purpetuate and encourage superstition,
ignorance and fraud; and to that end,
congresss, after cara of careful con
sideration, his prep ued a law which
guarantees to every Indian the right
to locate land in severalty, and to en
courage him so to do. It is therefore a
fact that
EVERY INDIAN
now living on the San Carlos reserva
tion could declare his purpose 10 relin
quis tribal relations and take advantage
of that law of congress. He could goto
the Tonto Basin or Verde valley, or
anywhere else on 'public lands. He
could pitch his tent, build his little
house, and file his declaration papers,
and all the
POWERS OF THE GOVERNMENT
Would be pledged to sustain and protect
him. Every official from President
Clivelasd down to the humblest, includ
ing the Governor of Arizona and the
Military Commander of this Department,
would be compelled to recognize and
protect him in his rights. The Interior
Department would give him perfect title
to his land, and this has been done in
hundreds of cases in the Teiritories and
States, and the Judges on the bench
would be prompt to recognize that title
against all trespassers and disputants.
For such is
THE LAWOFTHE LAND,
and by respecting and obeying it our
peoole prove that they are law abiding
citizens. At the same time the Indian
would be amenable to the civil law, the
same as any other man. But I have no
doubt that it would be more beneficial
to the Indians, and less embarrassing to
the Government, to aid and encourage
them in their efforts to locate on thetr
native lands or as near as practical in
the country available, than to risk the
possibility of an outbreak on the reser
vation, or arbitrarily confine them in a
place where they must die by slow de
grees. As far as I am concerned I have
BUT ONE OBJECT
the good of all interested and the desire
to maintain peace in the Department.
In my recommendations I have suggest
ed what I believed to be wise, humane
and practical in the solution of a diffi
cult problem. It any better or more sat
isfactory plan can be suggested it would
receive my cheerful and hearty support.
Very Respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
Nelson A. Miles,
Brigadier General, U. S. Army,
Commanding.
1 s
TWO SIDES.
Arizona cattlemen are divided on the
question as to whether Governor Zulick
is right in enforcing a quarantine against
Mexico. The Nogales Record publishes
the following:
To whom it may concern: We, a ma
jority of catttle owners in Arizona, utterly
repudiate having had anything to do with
the creation or issuance of the above
"proclamation," particularly as far as it
concerns the Republic of Mexico. The
originators of this scheme were neither
elected, appointed nor selected by us to
represent us in any way. Some mem
bers of this "commission," particulanlv
its chief officers, do not own a hoof of
stock. We declare this "act" to be far
sical, illegal, unconstitutional (conse
quently inoperative,) mean, contenlptible
trick and fraud, gotten up solely to pre
vent competition in the open cattle mai
ket. It is a farce, because disease must
exist tefore quarantine can be instituted
anywhere; and no disease has ever been
know to exist in that portion of Mexico
which is likely to send its cattle through
our line. "Illegal, unconstitutional and
inoporative," because "quarantine can
only be instituted against foreign coun
tries by general, not local, governments."
It is a "mean, contemptible trick and
fraud" because it was not instituted to
"quarantine" against disease, but solely
against the introduction of Mexican cat
tle, to enable a few mercenary, interested
men, to market the few head of steers
they control without competition, thereby
interrupting the commercial intercourse
and amicable relations existing between
the two largest and most progressive
nations on the western continent. Steps
have already been taken to have said
act abrogated by the general government,
and said movement be pursued to a fin
ish. We respectfully request the govern
ment and the people of Mexico 10 with
hold judgement until we shall have had
time to act in the matter, as we assure
them we are in earnest. We believe
that our Governor has been imposed
upon in this matter.
Respectfully,
A Majority of the Cattle Owners
in Arizona.
On the other hand, C M. Bruce, chair
man of the sanitary live stock commis
sion, gave the following reasons for the
commission recommending to the gov
ernor to quarantine against Mexican cat
tle. The following is quoted from Mr.
Bruce's letter:
"These proclamations were issued not
because there are now diseased cattle in
Mexico, but she has no' quarantine laws,
and we feel it to be simply a duty to our
cattlemen to protect them from all the
ills of contagious diseases that are liable
to be introduced into Arizona from com
munities that do not adopt even
safeguards to protect themselves.
For this reason alone we quarantined
against Missouri. I say this because
I see it stated in the newspapers that
we are only trying to destoy the sale
of Mexican cattle in local and California
markets which come in competition with
our own. This is a great injustice to the
commission, which is composed of linnoi
able men who are determined to do their
duty according to the dictates of their
own conscience."
We are now prepared to draw drafts
direct, issue letters of credit, and transfer
money by mail, and cable, on all points
of Europe Asia, Africa and Australia.
R. W. Wood.
Cashier
Bank of Tombstone
M. E. CHURCH.
The following is a statement of the
condition of the Tombstone Methodist'
Church for the year ending October 9th,
1887:
Amount laised $1802 37
Disburse.! as follows:
Church and parsonage
improvement 702 22
Old indebtedness lid
Sexton, organist, etc . 27 y '5
Salary superintendent. . 40 00
Salary pastor S00
Missions 102 00
Church extension 20 00
Children's ed. fund 500176237
Balance in treasury.. 40 00
record of pastor's services.
Sermons preached 94
Sacramental and praise services 8
Prayer and gospel meetings 76
Sunday-school sessions ,. v 51
Baptised n
'Marriages 18
Funerals 23
MEMBERSHIP.
Probationers on roll Sept. 30, 1886. ... 3
Received during year 18
Removed 5
Discontined 3
Received into membership 8
Died 1
Present number on roll 7
FULL MEMBERS.
Number on roll Sept. 30, 1886 20
Received from probation 8
Received by letter 7
Removed 8
Died 2
Present membership 25
G. L. Pearson, Pastor.
Leave your order for the San Francis
co Chronicle at Sol Israel's. Price, One
month 63 cents; Six months $4; One year
57. Payable in advance.
and after April 1st, weekly ice tick
ets will be sold for $1 and upwards. Ice
o weekly customers will not be delivered
without ttckets.
tf. Southwestern Ice Co.
The best butter in town at Wolcotts
The J. H.White brand.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
DR. E. C. DUNN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. OFFICE
on Tilth street, between Fremont and
Salf rd.
DR. AV. V. FETTERMAN,
OMKOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND
Surgeon. Offke corner of Sixtli and Fre
mont streets, Tomb.tone, Arizona.
WILLIAM HERRING. HOWARD K. HERRING.
HERRING & HERRLXG,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT
Law, Tuiighnul street, Tombstone, Aril.
W. H. STILWELL,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, Fourth street, TombUone, A, T.
ALLEN R. ENGLISH,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, up stairs in County Court House,
'1 ombstone, A. T.
JOHN C. EASTON,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. NOTARY
Public and Conveyancer. Office in Occi
dantal Hotel, Allen street. Tombstone, A. T.
HENRY G. HOWE,
UNITED STATES DEPUTY MINERAL
Surveyor, Tombstone, Arizona Member
ol the American Institute of Mining Engineers.
Attention given to the care of mines lor non
resident owners and corporations. The best of
reference given. Correspondence solicited.
W. D. SHEARER,
Justice of the peace, office
on Fourth street, opposite Occidental Hotel,
Tombstone, A. T.
CHAS. D. REPPY, .
VTOTARY PUBLIC, EPITAPH OFFICE,
J3I Tombstone, A T.
DR. WARNEKROS,
ENTIST. office corner FIF1
and Fremont streets, Tombstone. Arir.
aummunb.
In the Justice's Court of Precinct No. 6,
County of C. chise. Territory of Arizona.
Before D. K. Waruell,a Justice of the
Peace.
S. W. Bell, plaintiff, vs. Barbara Reeky,
alias May.J.defendant, and non-resident. Ac
ikn debt and attachment. Complaint led
in my office, and summons issued this day.
The Territory of Arizona to,Barbara Reeky,
alias May, defendant
You are hereby iumrroned and required to
appear and answer the com, -hint of plaintiff, at
my office in the village of Fairbank, Cochise
Coumy, Territory ol Arizona, within five
days, should this summons be served upon
you within this precinct; if served upon you
without this precinct but within this county, ten
diys, if served out of this county, v.ithin fifteen
days, otherwise twenty d?ys, (excluding the day
of service), from the day this iimirr.o.is is served
upon you. This action is brought to recover
judgment ag.iinst you for the sum of $30 due
plaint ff fcr two months rent of a house occupied
by you at Fairbink, and costs of sui'; pnd you
are hertby notified that should you fail to
appear and ansv.er siid comphint within the
time stated, the said plaintiff will apply to the
court lor siid judgment against you for said
sums and all cots.
Given under my hand at my office at Fairbink,
CcchUe County, Arizona, this 3d day of Octo
ber, A. D. 1887.
D. K. Warijwell,
Justice of the l'tace.
Marks &Wittig's
Toftsdrial Palace.
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL.
Hair-cutting, Shaving, Sham
pooing in the highest stylo of the
ait
TWEED'S STORE
OUIt MOTTOt
Live & Let Live.
WiWmm
Corner Allen and Fourth Street?
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
GooQs for Hie People at Popular Prices !
H. K. Tweed desires to call the attention of the Tombstont
public to his immense and varied stock of
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Which he is now r offering at prices that place the goods within
the reach of everyone.
All Eastern Goods purchased direct in the East, notj
second hand through California firms.
Among the thousand and one articles which fill this
mammoth store will be found
FAMILY GROCERIES
Of every description. Finest California canned goods. Eu
ropean and California dried fruit Table delicacies. Choice
coffee roasted and ground on the premises. Colgate's toile
and other well known brands of soap.
Clothing and Furnishing Goods
Of which a large assortment of both Eastern and California
goods will be found at very moderate prices.
The latest styles of everything in these lines rjieaper than
you can purchase in San Francisco.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Of choice imported and California brands by the cask, bot
tie or gallon. Finest American and imported liquors. High
grade cigars, tobaccos and cigarettes.
Also a full assntment of staple articles ol
And everything usually kept in a first-class General Mer
chandise Establishment
lost Complete Stock of Goods in Arizona.
No old goods. Everything fresh and new. Before yon
make your purchases take a walk through
TWEED'S STOEE
Cor. of Allen and Fourth Sts.
TOMBSTONE. ARIZONA.
GOOD GOODS
At Low Prices
BANK
-OF-
TOMBSTONE
CAPITAL S100,000.
TOMBSTONE, A IZONA
GEORGE BERROTT - . Preside!.
GEO. H. CARREL . . - Vice-President.
R. W. WOOD . ' Cashier,
WILL TRANSACT A GENERAL
KINO BUSINESS, EXCHANCE, RECEIVE B
- POSITS COLLECTIONS, ETC.
L. M. JACOBS.
Pn-sldent
A. E. JACOBS.
Cashier.
ise County Bant
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
i"nusacts t General Banking, Exchange u4
: Collection Business.
Bipedal attention given to all Business of Car
respondents and their interrjU
caretully served
Prompt attention guaranteed to all busts
entrusted to our care
Foreign and Domestic Encli&ngt
Bought and Sold.- -
G. w. swain,
Attorney-at-Law and Notary Public
Sect 113 roartb trect.
0 K CORRAL,
iJvery & Feed Stable
flRANBIBNT HTOOK WELL CARBD tQJX
Jl ttood variety ot Baggie. Carriages ana
Wagons, with teams to matcb. .Eleven-passenger
tzcntslon coach, snltable for picnics other
partlee. Orders sent by mall or telegraph tor
outfits will be promptly attended to.
Joha Hfintsromary Proprietor.
FRANK C. 1SARLE,
Assay Metallurgical Laboratory
Office: 319 Fremont Street,
Opposite City Hall.
J. V. VICKERS,
FREMONT STREET,
Real Estate,
Mines, Money,
and Insurant.
REAL ESTATE Bought, Sold and Rented.
COLLECTIONS Made, Taxes Paid. eta.
MONEY Loans Negotiated and Investrotaas
made.
INSURANCE Fire, Accident and Ufa.
MINES Bought and Sold.
NOTARYPUBLIO.
TOMBSTONE
FOUNDRY
AND-
MACHINE SHOP.
MCALLISTER 4 McCONE. Prop',
All Kinds or Mill and Mining Machinery,
Heavy ana Light Csetlues of Iran and Brass
Made to Ordor on Short Notice. Stamps, Puis.
Settlers, Retorts, Cages, Cars, Skeets, Balling
Tanks, Etc., from Latest Designs. PorublS
Hoisting Engines, 2-Sutop Prospectors' Mills
Made to Order. Screens or oil Descriptions
Punched or lotted. Engines Indicated and Ad.
lasted. Agents tor Albany Lubricating Com.
pounds. Cylinder, Hplndle and YalTe oils, West
Inthonse Automatic Engines lroin t to M
Horse Power and all elfo In the Machine sad
Foundry Line. Also
AGENTS FOR THE
LAFELLE TURBINE
WATER WHEEL.
JAMES P. MCALLISTER, Manager.
324 Fremont St.. Tombstone.
J1APLB ana FANCY QUOUBRIBH, Choices
C Brands of Kentucky Whisky, and grain of al
ends kept constantly on hand aud sold at lowea
orleea.
"A all line at Assayera' Supplies constantly
on hand.
FBAWTC n. AVHTTN Proprietor.
The Epitaph has the very beat
lacilitiei f r doing every variety of joh
printing. Work will be finished whea
promised, in the highest style of th
typographic art, and at the loweit living;
ffitt.
s'
Cod
0
Casn
Store

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