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Tombstone epitaph. (Tombstone, Ariz.) 1887-current, October 29, 1887, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060905/1887-10-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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YOI IX.
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA, OCTOBER 29, 1887.
NO. 13.
ARIZONA.
ITS VAST NATURAL RESOURCES
Governar Zullck'a Addrtea at the Opening of the
' Territorial industrial Exposition at
Phenlx.
Extracts from Governor Zulick's speech
at the opening of the Territorial fair, in
Phenix, October 17
Arizona is nb insignificant part of the
United States; in area she is an empire.
All of the New England States, with
New York and New Jersey combined,
only equal her in square miles of terri
tory. Her agricultural and horticultural
land exceeds in acreage the entire area
of either of the great States of Indiana,
Virginia? Kentucky or Ohio.. Her citrus
fruit belt, stretching from Yuma to the
mountain ranges of Pima, a distance of
aoo miles in length by 125 miles in width,
container 15,000,000 acres of land upon,
which will (row by irrigation, the orange,
lemon, lime, banana, fig, olive, date, and
raisin grape Every requirement of soil
and climate here exists to render it one
of the richest citrus and .semi-tropical
fruit. district in the world.
With a virgin soil enriched by the
debris of vegetation of centuries, it pos
sesses all the necessary elements of veg
etable nutrition to yield abundant and
profitable crops without the aid of artifi
cial.ferttluation save the application of
wat'en titled? pnly. to tickle it" with a
boejand it "will 'laugh with a1 harvest.
Nowhere on this "continent 'can' there be
iaund richer lands with greater produc
ing capacity, than in the valleys of the
Colorado, SaltjGija, 'San Pecjro, Santa
Crux and Verde rivers. To reclaim
these now desert lands, and make them
yield abundantly in, profitable crops,
there is needed.ah elaborate and perfect
system of irrigation. Already there have
been constiucted in Arizona some 400
miles of irrigating canalsat a total cost
of over $1,000,000, -whictrshould reclaim
25,000 acres of land, yet we have scar.ce-
commenced.'' We greatly need and
richly deserve Federal aid by an appro
priation lor an hydrpgraphic survey, with
a view to obtaining water by storage res
ervoirs in the mountain sheds, and test
the utility ol artesian wells foi the same
purpose in the valleys. The government
canJVtino better use part of the un
warranted ana surpluTfevenues which,
by an oppressive, war tariff, have been
taken from the, people and hoarded in
the United States Treasury vaults, than
expend lit In the 'reclamation if des
ert lands, thus aiding agricultural inter,
ests.
As your executive, I haveurged it in my
-annual report; and am not without hope
that Congress will look favorably upon
this reasonable request.
Nature has bo: confined Arizona to
the sole, resources of agriculture; with
prodigafhand she KasseamecTher moun
tains with precious minerals of every
kind known to science. From the north
ern line at Utah to the southern extreme
at Sonora, gold,' .silver and" copper are
found hidden in every, mountain side;
millioWof do'liarVof- precious metals are
annually produced as Arizona's output
and contribution of metaliferious wealth.
Mining campY aretfotted all-over the
territory, and tne music of hammer and
drill keen time with the steady step of
the prospector as he unearths' ihe hidden
treasures. This greatand flourishing in-
cu.tfy is still in its infancy; we are prac
tically only prospecting at the "grass
roots," wnile ouVgreat ore bodies are yet
undisturbed. Like agriculture, it has ex
pertenced drawbacks; without facilities
for Sransportattan,1 far re'iriqve'd1 from
smelters of California and Colorado, an'd
with exhorbiuntjfreights.hlgh grade
ores nave 'only been worte'd'." Now that
the freight' car is at 'our door, sampling
works erected inour midst, freights re
duced to a fafr standpoint, a new impetus
has been given tomlntng, and the annual
yield will steadily increase'and Aiitona
take the lead as'o'rie of the greatest proi-
djcers'of bullion of any ofthe'States qr
Territories. , '
Another great1 and leading industry
and source "of wealth in Arizona is her
stock growing. With p moral lands
equal in area tqjtfl of. New England,
hundreds" of thousands of cattle roam
over the grassy plains, valleys and hill
tides fattening and increasing, free from
lnft.ff
from
epidemic diseases ahd loss fro
climatic changes.. While the Texas stock
men have their herds decimated by
drouth, and the cattle of Montana' an
Wyoming have perised by the, thousands
from .tbetoldand hunger,, oijr herds
have improved) and the loss from these
causes have been merely nomipaj t With
abundance of nutritious grasses and our
equible climate, (clc, i.qanj the ranges
u cuius jrer wun penect security,
needing no additional food. With sound
anita'iy laws and an able "and" honest
Board of Un Stock Sanitary Commis
i6eWp'ee thenilajord iKC jfreat
growing and prosperous industry is fully
protected against" The introduction of
contagio-udiseues '&&.' it?"heVds
We-iSv'g fore&ttrriber tract
covering- asmaay square miles as Con-
Mobiaed, tU woUve coal i&u wkick
Iwill produce an excellent quality of fuel
for domestic and manufacturing pur
poses. We have a climate free from the heavy
fogs, damp winds and severe cold that
in other lands almost render life a bur
den, and enjoy the luxury of a dry, pure,
and bracing atmosphere with plenty of
sunshine and clear skys. What more
could nature do for any land? She has
been lavish in the distribution of her
favors. With an abundance of land,
fertility, and prolificness of soil, peifect
climate, plenty of lumber, fuel and
water, untold millions of wealth in her
mines, what can retard the progress of
Arizona?
Here people are brave, intejligent,
generous and progressive, maintaining a
complete system of public education,
making rapid strides in the develope
ment of moral and material interests;
they are laying the foundation deep and
strong for the building up of a free and
sovereign State, which in grandeur, re
sources and inteligenre will prove the
equal of any of the Federal Union.
ALASKA MINING.
Owing to a heavy matting of moss
that covers the ground of Forty Mile
creek, and in fact nearly the entire Yu
kon country, back a few feet from run--nine
water the eravel is frozen, and al
though it is rich in gold, it cannot be
worked. During the summer months
this moss becomes dry to a depth of sev
eral inches, and the miners have taken
advantage of this and are trying to burn
it offt so as to expose the gravel under
neath to tiie sun's rays. Thus the first
burning consumes it down a certain
depth, and when it is exposed to the sup
and atmosphere for a few weeks, it is
again set on fire. By this method it is
thought that in a couple of seasons a
vast amount of now frozen gravel will be
thawed out sufficient for washing. All
the gold so far taken out this season was
from bars lying along the streams, and
they could not be worked further back
than four feet, where they encountered
frozen ground, and so hard that it could
not be picked out, and powder for blast
ing is a thing that could not be obtained
in that country. It is, without the aid of
powder, an impossibility to reach the bed
rock on the deeper and richer bars. With
I so much coarse gold on the surface, ore
wonders whether or not it cannot be
shoveled out when bed-rock is or.ct
reached. Free Press.
.
TO ENCOURAGE IMMIGRATION.
An exchange say: "The directors of
the Southern Pacific are considering a
plan to colonize Southern California b
establishing a rate of $15 frcrr. Chicago
to San Francisco, confining it to emi
grants. The present rate of fare is $47 50,
so that the reduction would be about 6b
per cent. Between Ogden and San Fran
cisco, the Southern Pacific will be pre
vailed upon to make a nominal rate, so
that from the Missouri river the total tx-
pense ol passage would be about $5, not
including meals, The statement is made
that Senator Stanford feels that while
inviting the criticism uf that part of the
traveling public, which is to receive no
benefit from the plan, no real injustice
will be done; that those who are able 10
pay first-class fare would not ride in third
class cars, even if they were free, while
the majority of ihe so-called "emigrants"
ride in them merely because ihey tan get
a cheaper rate, and they are not privileg
ed to complain at free travel under the
Cbnditions of which it is granted. Mr.
Stanford says: "I had rather that 10,000
people come to this State at a $15 rate of
fare than that 5,000 come at $60."
The following is the acrostic that was
printed in the Chicago Daily News, a
proininenrcieveland paper, on the arri
val of President Cleveland in that city.
The initials read "Hurra for Blaine,"
'which was soon discovered by the public,
and Chicago laughed and laughed, and
the News blushed, and felt that it had
got its foot into it somehow at the mo
ment it meant to make a point on Cleve
land. The "guy" was the neatest and
I most complele that has befallen any
paper, in the country since the San Fran
cisco Examiner was so mercilessly guyed
a couple of v years ago. Here is the ac
rostic: f t
H-ere In the Und of promise,
U-der the the. glorious sky,
. R-eachlng awide o'er shore and tide,
R-uler and brid, do thou abide,
A-nd heart of the west, beat high!
P-orgettin j the dismal rancor
O-f years that should be dead,
R-ally'we all from cot and hall,
B-lessing our Nation's head,
Uonghfetoyou, O ruler,
A-nd to your gentle wife
I-n prosperous ways God guide your days
N-or count them past 'till you at last ,
E-njoy the endless life I
Guv Wilson.
'
Col. Wm. B. Royal, 41 h calavry, has
been retired on account of disabilities
incidenfto the service. His retirement
createt.tbe following promotions: Lieut.
'Coi. 'Charles E, Compton to be Colonel
4th cavalry; Maj. .James Biddle to be
Lieut. Colonel 5th cavalry; Capt. T. C.
Tuppt r tp be Major, 6th cavalryt- First
yeutFi'ank West Tio beCaptain 6th
wfvaltvr .Second '.iem'Geori; H.JjSands
to be First Lieut. 6th cavalry; additional
HW ". Alonzo Cray to.be Second
Uvt; flh Attlry. '
-THE CHEAPEST YET.
The Lowest Record In Working Gold
Ores.
(From the Mining and Scientific Press )
When gold can be mined in California
for 37 Jf cents a ton, and milled for 23
cents per ton, it is getting the business
down" to a very fine point, and augurs
well for the future of California quartz
mining. And this has just been ac
complished not with a smalt test run of
20 or 30 tons of ore, but with nearly 3000
tons. ,
It will astonish many persons to learn
that ore worth only $1 16 per ton can be
moved and worked without loss, and still
more surprise them to know that ore of
that value is paying about 56 cents per
ton profit.
This record was made last month at
the Spanish mine, Washington township,
Nevada county. The mine is being
worked under lease by F. W Bradley.
It has been in difficulty, and now the
lessee must take a monthly statement,
under oath, to the different creditors, to
whom certain portions of the monthly
ly profits go. The sworn statement
for the last month shows the following
figures:
MINE.
Run 22 days work produced 2796 tons
of ore.
Com of Production. Labor. Supplies. Total.
Extracting ore $466 59 $ 85 73 $572 32
De id work -.33730 43-o 38030
Delivering ore to mill 126.00 1070 136.70
General expenses.... 58,22 3.30 61.52
Totals $908.11 $14173 $105084
Cost per ton 324-100 51-100 37HC.
MILL.
Run 20 days' work reduced 2796 tons
ofore. f
O 'St of Reduction. Labor. Supplies. Total.
Mill expenses $163 45. S"3 JO $3-6 55
Water !or power '. . 153 20 15 20
H tilling ore iar 50 " 2 96 124 46
General expenses.. . 5833 330 6153
Tola's $343 8 $30156 $54474
Cost per ton 12 3-100. 10 7-ioc. 33c.
Bullion produced $3363 49
1 otal expenses 1695 58
Profit $1572 91
These figures speak for themselves.
The ore yields a httIe,over$i.i6 per ton.
The profit is 56 cents per ton, or about
48 p:r cent of the total The milling
plant consists of four Huntington milU,
three of them five feet and one four feet
wide. After crushing the pulp passes
over silver-plated amalgtmating plates,
though most of the gold is saved in the
mills themselves. The deposit of ore is
large and easily worked. There is no
hoisting or pumping done. It is quarried
out of the side of the hill and run by
means of cars to the.mills. The deposit
is large and the ore is quartz and slate
mixed, the vein being about 100 feet wide.
No concentrating is carried on. The
facilities for mining are exceptionally
good, or no such record could be made.
The company have to pay for water
power for their mills. '
This record is one that will attract
great attention among mining men.
There are thousands of acres ot ground
in this State that will yield mure than
this mine does per ton. In other cases
the expense of mining will be gi eater,
owing to circumstances,' but with the
same class of ore the milling need not be
much advanced. It Will be noticed that
these Huntington mills have shown'great"
capacity and the advocates ,of stamps
must look to their laurels if the roller mills
continue to do such work. In 20 aays'
work they crushed 2796 tons, a mill run
of some magnitude, and the. results of
which are startling. The fact that this
work was done for any stlch figures must
greatly encouraee many-owners of low
grade properties. AVe have been gradu
ally reducing the cost of millingores in
California, but the record at the Spanish
mine last month is ahead, of anything in
that line here or elsewhere.
'
THB ST. LOUIS MINERAL' EXHIBIT.
(From the journal Minet)
Through the courtesy of F.;M. Mur
phy we are enabled to lay before our
readers the contract made between the
officers of the St. Louis-Expoaition asso
ciation and the commissioners from the
territory, in regard to the permanent lo
cation of the mineral exhibit ,of the terri
tory, with the .additions, which will be
made from time to time, in the Exposi
tion building at St. Louis. The com
missioners succeeded in obtaining very
favorable terms, and the permanent loca
tion of the exhibit at so central a point
as St. Louis will undoubtedly be to the
great advantage of this section ol Ari
zona. The following are the terms, of the
agreement:
St. Louis Mo., Sept. 29, 1887.
To J. H. Johnson, Secretary of the St.
Louis Exposition Association.
Sir: The undersigned commissioners
from the territory of Arizona beg leave
to submit to you the following proposi
tions: , ; ? r .
We have here for exhibition our terri
torial collection of mineral formerly exhib
ited at ihe AVcrld'i Fair) New Orleans,
La., together wttb(valoable additions.
It is our wish to place the same on per
manent exhibition with your association,
providing .proper arrangerrents can be
made. The exhibit was brought here
particularity for exhibition at Armory
ball of your city-during the Grand Army
encampment; but rccogniiing the '
advantages of your exposition we have
deemed it advisable to propose exhibi
tion with you upon the following terms;
viz: "
First. Thu you furnish sufficient and
conspicu iii space in which to expose the
exhibit.
Second. That you fmiii-.li men to un
pack and exposr the .iiine, vican, repair
cases, etc.
Third. That all expense of making
this exhibit, other than the personal ex
penses of Arizona's representatives, shall
be borne to you. '
Fourth. That two commissioner's of
Arizona shall have access to the building
and exhibit during the progress' of the
present and'Juture expositions, and shall
have the privilege of, superintending' and
adding to the collection. 1 '
Fifth. That you will excercise care
and caution in preserving the exhibit
from spoliation and loss. Unavoidable
accidents excepted.
Sixth. In consideration of the fulfill
ment of the above conditions the exhibit
shall remain on permanent show at this
exposition during the continuance
thereof and shall not be removed at any
future time without the consent of the
exposition management and re-payment
to the association of whatever moneys
they may have expended in fitting up and
placing the same; and should the
officials of the territory of Ariioria ever
demand said exhibit to be shown else
where they shall first reimburse the ex
position association of St. Louis for what
ever expense shall be incubent upon
the' said association to surrendered the
same. ' -
Seventh. That due diHigence shall
be observed in putting this collection
upon permanent and conspicuous" ex
hibition. . ' W. F. R. SCHINDLER,
N . O. Murphy,
' Commissioners.
Accepted for St. Louis Exposition.
&. H. Johnson,
v ji Secretary.
f-
Climax chewing tobacco only 50 cents
a plug at the Willows cigar store.
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel
nf purity, strength and wholesomeness
More economical then the ordinary kinds
and cannot be sold in competioniwiththe
multitude ofjow test, shojt weigty alum
or phosphate powders. Sold only in cans.
Royal Baking Powder Co., 106 Wall
St., N. Y. - i - -. "
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
DR. E. C. DUNN, " .
Physician and surgeon, office
on Tilth street, between .Fremont and
saffird. ' "'' - '
DR. W. V. FETTERMAN;
Homeopathic ' physician Xnd
Surgeon. Office corner of Sixth'and Fre
mont streets. Tombstone, Arizona ,, . . '
WILIIAM HERRING.
HOWARD P. HKRRlNO.
HERRING & HERRIlNG, '
ATTORNEYS "AND COUNSELORS AT
Law, Toughnut streetr-Tombstone, Ariz.
W H. STILWELI,'- -
ATTORNEY AND"- COUNSELOR- AT
Law,a Fourth street, Tomb t one, Ai T, .,
ALLEN R. ENGLISH
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR" AT
Law, up stairs m Count Court-House,
1 ombstone; A.'T. ' '
. JOHN C. EASTON,
J US I ICE OF THE PEACE. NOTARY
Public-and Conyeyancer.S Offiie in Occi.
dantal Hotel, Allen street. Tombstone; A. T.
HENRY G. HOWE,
1
UNITED STATES DEPUTY MINERAL'
Surveyor. Tombstone. Arizona. Mrnhr
ol the Anwrian Institute of Mining Engineers.'
miciuun given-10 jne care 01 mine lor non
resident owners and corporation." fhebe'stof
rcicrence given, torresponaence solicited. ,
" w7d, shearer, r
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. OFFICE
on Founh street, opposite Occidental Hotel,
Tombstone. A. T., , ..! -.M
CHA.S. D. REPPT, ' .
VTOTARY PUBLIC,' EPITAPH OFFICE.
J.1 Tonibslone. A. T, l '. ,,vjj, ..
.DR, WARNEKROS.
pOYAi
LRPYALKqQ
AKir
T - kENTIST. OFFICE CORNER FIFTH
and 'ruoont ttrnts, Tembtt9nt, Arb, i L,,
TWEED'S
r 1 -..
OUB MOTTOi
Live & LetLife,
iM
Cornel Allen and . Fourth Street
TOMBSTONE, ABIZOXA. .
Ms for tie People at Popular Prices!
n t-t
H. K. Tweed desires to call the attention of. the,. Tombstone
public to his immense and varied stock of
t . T - -
GENERAL, MERCHANDISE,
't. i r.
Which, he is now offering at
tne reacn 01 everyone.
rr vttl
All Eastern Goods purchased direct in the East, not
second hand through California firms. ,
Among the thousand and one articles which fill this
mammoth store will be found
'" - e.1 . r, a , ,,
FAMILY GROCERIES,
Of every description! Finest California canned goods. Eu
ropean and California dried fruit- Table delicacies. ; Choice
coffee roasted and ground on the premises. Colgate's toile
and other well known' brands of soap.
Clothing and Furnishing Goods
Of which ah large assortment of both Eastern and California
goods will be found at very moderate prices.
I &-uJ'. f I
The latest styles of everything in these lines cheaper than
can purchase in San Francisco.
you
v' ' a j.w
Wines. Liquors and Cigars
J .5.'. 9VIU tTtf C tr ' -r i
Of choice imported and California brands by the cask, bot
tie, or gallon; Finest American and imported liquors. High
grade cigars, tobaccos -and cigarettes.-
Also a'full
11 assntment of
,71 Z'U -a' 1. it.
And everything usually kept
?vrr
:pk!0 :-..t
chandise
Most Complete Stock
-j- il a 0 5 f.
No old goods. Everything fresh and new. Before vott
make your purchases take a walk through
t ,rS': ' etc (.r.. rw .J1, .4( , .,
TWEED'S STORE ,
Gor. of dfllpn anfl:;Fpftb jSte,
TOMBSTONE,
STORE
GOOD GOOD
rj , .
prices that place the goods within
- ff t -
staple articles of
-H-l. W li"i "i-
in a first-class General Mer
BHlAtLowFriees
Kb),! T"Vr1 " :-.wTn
Establishment
of Goods in Arizona
ARIZONA
BANK.
-OF-
TOMBSTONE
CAPITAL 8100,000.
T6MBST0HE, A IZONA
QEORGE BERROTT - . Preside,
GEO. H. CARREL - - - Vice-President
R.WVWOOD Ctsbur.
WILL TRANSACT A GENERAL
KINO BUSINESS, EXCHANGE, RECEtrl M
PBSIT3 COLLECTIONS, ETC.
L. M. JACOBS.
t President
A. E. JACOB.
Cuhiec
Cochise County Bank
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
rnuuaets a General Banking, Exchange u4
ouecuoa Business.
Especial attention given to all Business of Car-
" respondents and their Interrsts
I - carefully served
Prompt attention guaranteed to all linili
entrusted to our care
Foreign and Domestic Enchingt
Bought and Sold.
a. W. SWAIN,
Attorney-at-Law and Notary Publi.
113 Foartb Street.
OXOORRAL,
'it' i f" J " 1
averr & Feed Staltle
flRANBIENT STOCK WBLL CARBD Cfl
JL Good variety ot Bnggtet, Ctniaget is
wagMt, with teams to match. Kleren-puseant
xenulon cotch, eutwble tor picnic other
parties. Orders rent by mall or teltph tar
outfits will be promptly attended to.
HaatcoaAry PraBrtota.
' PJBANK C. EARLE,
Assiy I Metallurgical Laboratory
Office: 310 Fremont Street,
Opposite Citv Hall.
J. V. VICKERS,
FREMONT STREET,
r
Seal Estate,
Mines, Money,
and Insuranoe.
REAL ESTATE-Bought, Sold and Rented.
COLLECTIONS Made, Taxes Paid, etc..
MONEY Loans Negotiated and Invettmeau
made.
INSURANCE Fire. Accident and Life,
MINES Bought and Sold.
NOTARYPUBLIO.
TOMBSTONE
F0.UIDKY
AND-
JVIAQHINE SHOP.
McALLISTER'4 McCONE. Prop'.
A11 Kiadt of Hill and
Mining Machinery,
butt ana Light Ctetloca of Iron and Brtii
Made to Order on Hhnn N,H- ,..,. t.
ron ana ant
Stamps, Pans,
BttleTi,Betorti, Cages, Care,' Skeeta. ballllS
SSf.it.' "Jf" .I0,a J11 Dealgna. Portabft
Holatlng Englnea, 8-Stamp Proepectora' Mllli
Madey w Orderi Bcreena of all DeaerlrUona
Punched or lotted. Knglnea Indicated and AC
uatd Agrata 'or Albany Lubricating Com
pousda. Cylinder, Mplndle and Valt colli, Weat
Inehonie Automatic Bnrlnes tiom z to fuo
Bona Power and all elfo In the Uachlae ana
foundry Una. Alao
AGENTS FOR THE
LAFELLE TURBINE
WATER WHEEL.
JAMBS P. MCALLISTER, Managtr.
324 Fremont St.. Torabstoae,
8TAtLB ana PANOV QKOUARIBS.Choli
HH.wT,.;.ir:rr- v"',.vi",u.n"' w
ofal
mT. r u'tfH aanaanaaoia
at lovaa
"A nil lint lAaiajeri'
on hand.
SnpplUa eoaataatlr
rBAyKW.AUHTTTf Pfonrtotor.
TheuEFrTAPH has the very beat
facilities for doing every variety ot jofc
printing. Work will be finished whm
premised, in the highest style of th
typogtaphic att, and at the lowaat liviog
frit
mm
Gasii
Store
.
ll

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