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Tombstone epitaph. (Tombstone, Ariz.) 1887-current, December 03, 1887, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060905/1887-12-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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ftifwl. .,
VOL. IX.
TOMBSTONE, AEIZONA, DECEMBER 3, 1887.
NO. 18.
- VALUE OF ALFALFA.
The growth and cultivation of alfalfa
as' a never-failing source of feed adapted
to dry climates and arid soils is unques
tioned.. Its power to obtatn a footing in
the soil and to retain moisture sufficient
to perpetuate its growth are incalculable.
Hence its cultivation should be more
generally resorted to where other vegeta
tion refuses to grow for lack of moisture.
It is an effective agency in the reclama
tion of sterile lands.
The Denver Field and Farm, which
ought to be good authority, in answering
the question. "How long will Alfalfa live
and produce without being re-seeded,"
says:
"We conclude that there is no one
living who could answer 'Iheuestion
with intelligence. It has lived on iq the
country from which we have obtained it
though many generations of men, and
nowhere in history can we find it has
ever died out. We read that three hun
dred years ago the Jesuits from Spain
sailed the South seas, and as a precau
tion. against the starvation of shipwreck
ed mariners, planted alfalfa on the little
islands of the ocean, and left a few pair
of goats male and female that they
might" eat this everlasting plant and pro
duce theirkind, andpossiblybethe means
of saving human life. Wehave knowledge
of fields of this plant still flourishing near
the ancient city' of Pueblo, that were
planted in the days of Cortez, the inva
der. In speaking of this subject with
Colonel Ed M. Wood of this city, he who
traveled Old Meklco long before the reign
of Santa Ana, we learned some interest
ing facts about the plant, and from one
who has observed it growing for over a
half a century. 'I was in Chihuahua
as early as 1844, and to feed my mules,
purchased some alfalfa cropped from a
field near the city. Forty years later,
1884, 1 again returned to the country,
and on seeing the same field fresh with
that beautiful grass plant, I enquired of
the proprietor who was the same Cas
tilian I had purchased (he hay of in the
olden time if this had ever been re
planted, or the land fertilized, and was
told that it had not. He informed me
that from his best information the field
had been 'planted by his ancestors, 100
years prior to 1844.' In the grand val
ley of Taos, near the village of that name,
is a small field of this plant growing that
has yielded three crops per year for
more than one hundred years. We
were informed by the proprietor of this
meadow, a few days since, that he had
cut the ' grass from this field for sixty
years, and he believed that the crop of
the present year was stouter than it has
ever been before Now from all these
evidences, we conclude that alfalfa is a
never dying plant." San Diego Union.
AN UNCOMMON FISSURE VEIN.
In the whole history of mining it 'is
difficult to find any account of a fissure
which equals what is commonly known
as the Smuggler vein, in Marshall Basin,
San Miguel county. The properties
located on the vein and worked at a
profit are the Union, Smuggler, Sheridan
and Mendota, and through these claims
there is one continuous chute of pay
ore, which is fhree thousand five hundred
feet long, The ore in this chimney does
not occur in pockets or bunches, giving
spots only which will pay for stoping, but
the entire vein is sloped out, no portion
of it being too poor to yield pay ore.
There are several peculiar features
about the vein, making it one of the most
interesting studies for the mining geolo
gist. One .is the occasional occurrence of
free gold ore'next to one wall, while next
to the other the ore will be a rich silver
ore, the silver occurring in the form of a
sulphide. Frousrite or ruby silver,
stephanite, grey copper, gelena, chalcopy
nte and native silver and gold are alt
oucd in the vein. Denver Republican.
ROOFING MATERIAL.
lFlorei.ce Enterprise. )
In a country like Southern Arizona,
where habitations are required to be im
pervious to heat and cold as well as
water, the question of material for roof
ing is as serious and important one.
Shingles are liable to warp and crack
under the heat of the summer's sun, and
iron absorbs an undesirable quantity of
heat. The old mud roof comes nearer
to filling all requisities with the one ser
ious fault that it may take a sudden
notion during' a rain-storm to dump the
the water into the house instead of carry
ing it off.
Mr. C; D. Henry, of this place, during
his sojourn in Sinaloa, Mexico, some
years ago, saw old reservoirs that with
stood the effects of time for centuries
and were, still apparently in good .con
dition. He leanred that the peculiar
cement with which they were lined was
a simple compound and quite inexpen
sive. It consisted of no less than com
mon lime mortar into which a quantity
of prickly pear juice has been incorpora
ted.' The prickly pear was placed in a
barrel or tank after being cut up in pieces
a few inches square, and then covered
with water, In several days a fermenta
tion commenced, when the slimy sub
stance was poured off and was ready to
mix withithe'raprtar. Thejphilosophy of
the virtues of the mixture were not ex
plained and the Mexicans were content
with knowing that it made an enduring
cement absolutely impervious to water.
In building his residence in Florence,
Mr. Henry availed himself 'of the know
ledge obtained in Sinaloa, after having
made a failure of a cement roof. He
followed the formula above given, and
although a heavy rain fell the day follow
ing its application, not a drop of water
found its way through the roof, and it
has as successfully withstood all the sub
sequent storms.
If the experienci of others corrobor
ates that of Mr. ilenry, one of the most
difficult proble its to builders in warm
countries will be solved, for the material
can be easily applied to any style or
angle of roof and a couple of coals ol
paint will gfvgjfr any desired shade- and
probably add to its durability.
AMERICA'S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN.
"The highest mountain in America
must now be changed from Mount St.
Elias to Mount Wrangel, a little to the
north. Several of these mountains have
been newly mearsured. Mount Hood
once "roughly" estimated at 17,000 feet,
then closely at 16,000, was brought down
by trangulation to 13,000; an aneroidbar
ometermadeit 12,000 and a mercurial
barometer 11,253. Mount St. Elias, es
timated by D'Agelet to be 12,672 feet, is
triangulated by Mr. Baker to 19,50. It
now appears that Mount Wrangel, lying
to the north, rises 18,400 feet above Cop
per river, which is turn 2,000 feet above
the sea at that point. If this holds true
Mount Wrangel is at least 1,000 feet
higher than any other peak in North
America. It lies within the United
States boundary. Nature.
.
In November, 1884, without any prov
ocation or suspicion, but purely from
malicious motives, an agent of the Atlan
tic and Pacific railroad company caused
the arrest ef Art McDonald, the Un
der Sheriff of Apache county, charging
him with stealing coal from their cars at
Holbrook. McDonald in vain sought an
apology from the Superintendent and
solicitor of the road, after he had been
honorably discharged by the Justice of
the Peace. The attorney would say
nothing; the manager E. W. Smith, in
stead of sending him a line which he
could show to his neighbors and friends
in hi3 vindication, added insult to injury
by telling him that the coal found upon
his lot made his case look ugly. In
December, 1884, McDonald having no
other recourse, sued the company for
malicious prosecution. Owing to the
rulings of the Judge, for four terms of the
court no service of a summons could be
had upon the road. At the last term of
our court, under our new code and the
rulings of Judge Wright, McDonald
succeeded in getting the railroad into
court.
Judge Hazeldine then moved the case
to the Federal Court at Prescott. The
trial took place on the ninth instant, and
was a triumphant and complete vindica
tion of McDonald, and a verdict against
the Raihoad company for $2,300 dam
ages. St. Johns Herald.
THE IMPENDINGCRASH IN SOUTHERN
CALIFORNIA.
Charles Noidhuff, a special corre
spondent of the N'ew York Herald, in a
letter to that p er, from which we quote
says, in refe ence to the California
boom:
"The state of the case is deplorable,
and the reaction and failure destined
soon to succeed to this senseless craze
will bring on one of the most wide-reaching
crises ever known in the United
States."
He fortifies hisopinion by a quotation
from the Sacramento Record-Union,
which particularly refers to Los Ange
les as an illustration of the craze. It
says:
"We do not believe that the 60,000
acres immediately adjoining Los An
geles, which have been divided into town
lots, can maintain town site values with
less than 2,000,000 of population. The
city of San Diego embraces nearly
90,000 acres. Applying the computation
of twenty persons to ihe acre, 1,800,000
will be required to maintain townsite
property values over this vast extent of
land. Every earnest, sober and patriotic
consideration urges a protest against
this condition. It cannot result other
wise than disastrously to the best and
truest interests of the people of the
State. It is being promoted unquestion
ably by real estate boomers, brokeis and
agents, who have personal, pecuniary
motives in view."
Land prospectors in from Colfax
county, N. M., state that the Rock Island
Railroad company have two thousand
teams and a large number of men at
work on its grades in Northwestern New
Mexico. From Seward, Kansas, across
No Man's Land and west to a point sixty
miles east of Ocate on the A. T. & S. F.,
the work of grading is in progress.
Grade stakes have been put down to
Ocate and Dorsey station, at one of
which points the Rock Island is to cross
the A. T. & S. F., reaching the Rio
Grande valley, via Cimarron Pass, Juan
Vigit canyon in Taos valley, sixty miles
north of Santa Fe. This is the Pacific
coast line of the Rock Island.
LOW GRADE GOLD ORE.
From the Mining and Scientific Press.
In a lecent number of the Mining and
Scientific Press (Oct. 22(1), we gave the
record of the Spanish mine, Washington
township, Nevada county, in this State,
for the month of September, which show
ed some remarkably cheap mining and
milling, the work being done on 1 large
scale. The mine is under lease to F. W
Bradley, and a sworn statement is made
each month ol the yield and cost. The
record for October is even more surpris
ing than that of September, recently
quoted, for several hundred tons moie
rod; were mined and milled, and a profit
was marts on rock worth less than a
dollar a ton. According to the terms of
the lease, all proceeds must be applied
to trie pajment pro rata of the prelerred
claims against ihern!ne, s'o that the
statement may be relied on as accur
ate. The record for the last month is as
follows:
MINE.
Run: 28 days' work produced 3443
tons of ore.
Cost of Production. Labor. Supplies. Total,
Extracting ore $71350 $11340 $81691
Deliviingore to mill 160.20 1795 171.15
Dcaduork 103.20 10.93 II6 J3
General expenses.... 78,35 1.95 8030
Totals $1047.25 $144.24 $1191.49
Cost per ton 30 4-ioc 4 2-ioc 34 6 roc.
MILL.
Run: 244 days' reduced 3440 tons of
ore.
Cost of Reduction. Labor. Supplies. Total.
Mill expenses $227 32 $194 33 $121 65
Water Jor power i6r 70 161 70
Hauling ore 154 50 535 15985
General expenses... 78 40 1 95 80 35
Totals $460 22 $363 33 $823 55
Cost per ton.... i 3-10C 106-ioc 23 9-ioc.
Bullion produced $3138 55
'1 olal expenses 2015 04
Profit $1123 51
It will be seen from this that the ore
only ielded a trifle over 91 centsperton,
yet a profit of 32 6-10 cents per ton re
sulted. The percentage of profit was
35 S-io of the total. This is the very
lowest record of quartz working yet. The
fact that any profit at all can be made on
such low grade ore is remarkable. In
September 2796 tons of ore were worked
which yielded $1.16 per ton. The piofit
was 56 cents per ton, or about 48 per
cent of the total. The profit that month
on a yield of $3268 49 was $157291. The
cost of mining was 37 " cents, and of
milling 23 cents per ton.
Huntington mills arc used, there being
one 4-foot and 5-foot mills. These
combined mills in working the 3443 tons
of ore last month crushed 140 tons per
day, at a cost of 23 9-10 cents per ton.
This is a record of quartz crushing which
is hard to beat.
THE CURSE OF THE COUNTRY.
It is safe to say that during the past
few weeks there has been more systemat
ic blackmailing done in this city than in
any other town or camp in the west. We
are personally cognizant of several im
portant deals the consummation ol
which would have been of great advan
tage to the countiy which have failed
through the bhckmailing of persons re
siding in this city. When a sale is
bioken in this manner, it is not one time
in a thousand that the parties ever do in
vest a cent in the country, whereas if they
were left alone thousands ofdollars would
be turned loose. Blackmailing is a des
picable sort of business at best, but when
it is indulged in by men who are intei
ested in the country, it is simply unpar
donable. Silver City Enterprise.
We have just learned, with infinite sat
isfaction, that what are known as the tax
cases against the Atlantic and Pacific
Railroad Company, were decided by
Judge Wright on last Thursday, favor
ably to the county. The court held in
the Baca case, that the railroad and
county, in good faith entered into con
tract as to the basis of taxation of the
read. That the county had kept its faith
in the matter and had done no wrong.
The railroad, though it had conducted all
of the negociations through its solicitor,
Judge Hazeldine, and paid taxes two
years under the agreement made by him
for it, could not, when it suited its inter
est or caprice, repudiate his conduct
would not be permitted, to use the lan
guage of the court to "blow hot and cold"
as suited its convenience, but must pay
up.
In the Lesueur case, the court decided
that while the road's right of way was,
in express terms, exempt from taxation,
yet the act of Congress being silent on
the subject, the improvements placed on
the right of way and a certain proportion
of the rolling stock, telegraph line, etc.,
weie properly assessed and should pay
taxes. Otherwise, said the court, all of
the rolling stock of the numerous rail
roads concentrated at Kansas City and
Chicago would only be taxable in those
two cities, notwithstanding the fact that
nine-tenths of it, most of the time, was
elsewhere, receiving the benefits and pro
tection of the local laws and the police
force.
The opinions in both cases are exhaus
tive and elaborate, covering the whole
ground fully and fairly, and are spoken
of by the attorneys who heard them in
terms of the highest commendation.
They are said to reflect great credit
upon the astuteness and ability of Judge
Wright as a learned lawyer thty cer
tainly are the highest possible tributes to
the manliness and feailess integrity per
sonally of our distinguished Chief Justice.
Tht- amou'it involved was about $35,000,
St. Job. Hn .Id.
t
On Tnesaa the men employed by the
Southern Pacific Company, cliree miles
east of of Indio, S'ruck .1 st ady flow of
puie water at 540 feet 111 depth. The
present flow is about 10,000 gallons per
hour, but the engineer in charge expects
to obtain a flow of at least 24,000 gallans
when the pipe is cle ired of clay and
gravel. Work has been going on for the
past six weeks on this will, the success
of which will undoubtedly result in many
more being bored. Yuma Sentinel.
A jury in Tombstone has acquitted a
murderer whose crime was probably as
cold blooded as any that has stained the
criminal recoids of the Territory for
yeais. A few examples of a stern appli
cation of justice are necessary to remove
the horrible suspicion that the blind god
dess is accumulating a bank account.
Florence Enterprise.
The richest gold mine in the world has
been found on the Hassayampa River in
Arizona. This historic stream was
named by an early Spanish settler after
a jcu d'esprit of his little son, who, on
being told to give his brother a cold
potato, replied, "he has a yam pa." N.
Y. Graphic.
Governor Zulick has recalled his proc
lamation in reference to the quarantin
ing of cattle from Mexico. He issued it in
compliance with the law, the sanitary
commission demanding it, and now he
lifts the quarantine in justice to the cat
tle men of the Southern portion of Ari
zona. An eastern paper rays that a cup of
hot milk, into which a spoonful of ground
ginger has ben stirred, will effectively
break up the chills if taken just as one i,s
coming on. It is a simple remedy and
is worth trying.
WDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel
of purity, strength and wholesomeness
More economical then the ordinary kinds
and cannot be sold in competion with the
multitude of low test, short weight alum
or phosphate powders. Sold only in cans.
Royal Baking Powder Co., 106 Wall
St., N. Y.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
DR. E. C. DUNN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. OFFICE
on Fifth street, between Fremont and
Saflord.
DR. W. W. FETTERMAN,
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND
Surgeon. Offue corner of Sixth and Fre
mont streets, Tombstone, Arizona.
WIILIAM HERKING.
HOWARD F. HERRING.
HERRING & HERRING,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT
Law, Toughnut street, Tombstone, Ariz.
W. H. STILWELL,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, Fourth street, Tombstone, A, T.
ALLEN R. ENGLISH,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
Law, up stairs in County Court House,
Tombstone, A. T.
JOHN C. EASTON,
JUS 1 ICE OF THE PEACE, NOTARY
Public and Conveyancer. Office in Occi
dantal Hotel, Allen street, Tombstone, A. T.
HENRY G. HOWE,
UNITED STATES DEPUTY MINERAL
Surveyor, Tombstone, Arizona. Member
of the American Institute of Mining Engineers.
Attention given to the care of mines lor non
resident owners and corporations, f he best of
reference given. Correspondence solicited.
W. D,. SHEARER,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. OFFICE
on Fourtli street, opposite Occidental Hotel,
Tombstone, A. T.
CHAS. D. REPPY,
"r"OTARY PUBLIC, EPITAPH OFFICE,
IA Tombstone, A. T.
DR. WARNEKROS,
ENTIST. OFFICE CORNER FIFT
and Fnmont streets, Tombstone, Ariz,
2? f DnVil BKIKO Tk -TM
fr .KUYnL powder j
fill
TWEE'S STORE
4k'' '
JMk
OUR MOTTO:
Live & Let Liye;
Corner Allen and Fourth Street,
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
Goods for Hie People
H. K. Tweed desires to call the attention rof the Tombstone
public to his immense and variedstockof
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Which he is now offering at prices that place the goods within
the reach of everyone.
All Eastern Goods purchased direct in' the East, not
second hand through California firms.
Among the thousand and one articles which fill this
mammoth store will be found
FAMILY .GROCERIES
Of every description. Finest California canned goods. Eu
ropean and California dried fruit Table delicacies'. Choice
coffee roasted' and ground on the premises.' CdlgateY toile
and other well known brands of soap.
Clothing and Furnishing Goods
Of which a large assortment of both Eastern arid' Calif omit
goods will be found at very moderate prices.
The latest styles of everything in these' lines cheaper thar
you can purchase in San Francisco.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Of choice imported and California brands by the cask, bot
tie or gallon. Finest American and imported liquors. Higl
grade cigars, tobaccos and cigarettes.
Also a full assn-tment of staple articles ol
And everything usually kept in a first-class: General Mer
chandise Establishment.
lost Goih M of M' 11 Aril
No old goods. Everything fresh and new. Before, you
make your purchases take a walk through
TWEED'S StfdBB
Cor. of Allen and Fouitli Sfe
TOMBSTONE ARIZONA
I f
RlMRBB53a GOOD .GOODS-
KfRitlOFFW
sPBH& ' s&& . Jfe.
dSxi. JaLs-
at Popular Prices .'
t. !,,' ,t,v
'i-'" W"
BANK
-OF-
TOMBSTONE
CAPITAL $iOO,Ou(X
TOMBSTONE, A IZONA
GEORGE BERROTT . . President.
GEO.-H. CARREL . . . Vice-President.
R. W.WOOD Owhitr.
WILL TRANSACT A GENERAL
K1MC BUSINESS, EXCHANGE! RECEIVE K
P0SIT8 COLLECTIONS, ETC.
L. M, JACOBS,
President.
A. E. JACOBS.
Cashier.
ise County M
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA.
Transacts a General Banking1, Exchang and
Collection Business,
Especial attention given to 'all Business f Cor
respondents and their interests
carefully served
Prompt attention guaranteed to all busiasM
entrusted to our care
Foreign and Domestic Enchanft
bought and soldi
MM ,, ftt.
0 K CORRAL,
jMrj
flRAHBIBNT STOCK WELL CARED CJr
XI Oood variety of .Boggles, Carriages tat,
wagons,' frith teams to match: ileven-passefcrer1
excuasjon coach, suitable, for .picnics. v other
parties. Orders sent by mall or telegraph for'
outfits will be promptly attended to.
Joha Hoatffoaaerv' Proprietor.
FRANK O. JSABEE,
Assay Metatlurgicallaitiorattfy
Office: 319 Fremont Street,
1
Opposite City Hall.
J.V. VICKERS,
FREMONT STREET,
Efeal Estate,
, Mines, Money,
1 and Insnrano.
.REAL ESTATE Boueht. Sold and RentedV
POL'LECTIONS Made, Taxes Paid, etc!,
MONEY Loans Negotiated and Investment'
made.
INSURANCE Fire. Accident and Life.
JINES Bought and Sold.
NOTARY PUBLIC.
TOMBSTONE
FOTJIDBT
AND-
MACHINE SHOP.
, MCALLISTER & McCONE. PropV
AUrKinda of Mill and. Klnlng , Machinery,,!
.Heavy ana Light Cutlngs of Iron and Brass
trade to Order on Hhon Notice. Stamps, (Falu.
Settlers, Retorts, Cages, Cars, Bkeets, Bailing.
Tanks, Etc., from Latest Designs, Portable
'Hoisting Engines, 2-Stamp ProepectorsV XlUs).
Hade to Order. Screens of all Descriptions
Punched or lqtted. Engines Indicated, ana Adi
lasted. Agents 'or Albany Lubricating Com.
pounds. Cylinder, Spindle and Valve olli, WesU
lnghoose, Automatic Engines from t to JOO
Horse Power and all eleo In the Machine ant
Foundry Hoe. Also
AGENTS FOR THE
LAFELLE TURBINE
WATER WHEEL
james' p. McAllister, Um&r.
.124 Fremont Si. Tombstone
aiALK ana FANOT QHOOKBtKB. Choice"!.
0 Brands ol Kentucky, Whisky, and grala of J r
kinds krpt constantly on hand and tola atlowsa
orlees.
HrA nil line of Assayers' Supplies constantly
on hand,
1
FRANK B. AU8TXK ProDrietor."
Mineral Surveyor.
U. S. Deputy Mineral Surveyor and
City Engineer, surveys, maps and reports
on mines a specialty. All work per
formed at reasonable prices. Land
surveys and applications made promptly.
Best of references given.
H. B. MaxsoN,
Office 316 Fifth St
Tombstone, Ark.
Gocb
kmwt
Papap
Cash
Store

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