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The Parker post. (Parker, Ariz.) 1910-1918, June 22, 1912, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060922/1912-06-22/ed-1/seq-4/

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PAGE FOUR
CONCERNING THE OPENING OF
THE RESERVATION LANDS.
LWhile the following article by A.
S. Prescott is written in a satirical
vein, the arguments set forth have
been actually advanced by various per
been actually advanced by various per
sons —and a few bonehead legislators
—against the opening of the reserva
tion lands. As set forth by Mr. Pres
cott these arguments surely are de
vfoid of any reason, or logic, and iit is
liaid to believe that they can be en
tertained by any sane person, but
they are. —Ed,]
To whomsoever it may concern:
We, the people of Parker, having tail
ed through the heat and burden of
four long years and being well advis
ed of the conditions that, exist at
this time, beg leave to make a state
ment and protest against the efforts
that are being made by many inter
ested in the town of Parker, and the
surrounding country, to open said
reservation to settlement.
If this reservation were opened to
settlement, it would provide homes
for some four thousand families,
which would induce these families to
leave other communities where they
are doing well enough, and the:
would want to establish homes her:
which would cause the expenditure c
many thousands of dollars, thereb
furnishing employment for a numb:,
of working people, carpenters, brick
layers, etc., who would also corns
to this country and deprive some com
munity of their workmanship and
probably make room for other j
who may now be crowded out of sc
work.
Besides, the merchants of this
country might be able to supply the;:
new people with groceries and cloth
ing and by so doing make a litil
money out of the mercantile business,
while it is well known that
this should not he the case
and that, they should be dis
couraged as much as possible, an:
lot the people send to Tears, Sore
hack & Co., or some other good Chi
cago house because these Chicago
people do not pay any taxes into the
state treasury, thereby creating a
fund that will cause our corrupt leg
islators to sit too many days during
this nice warm weather at $7.00 per,
while they could be at home play
ing checkers with some lonesome pal
who was not so fortunate as to knock
down so rich (?) a plum.
Also, it will create about $20,000,-
000 taxable property for the state to
squander the proceeds of. It will
cause some blooded .plutocrats with
tainted money to come in here and
survey and build a railroad through
this land for its development and the
convenience of the people, who have
too easy a time as it is now and
ought to he made to travel as our
forefathers did, with ox-teams, and
be compelled by the absence of cheap
transi*orta'tion to sell their produce
for less and do away with the high
cost of living, among themselves.
POOL and BILLIARDS
Fresh Stock Fine Cigars and Tobaccos
“BARETTE” The Best* Temperance Beer
always ice cold. Soft drinks of all kinds.
HENRY STROHM
Cor. A and Ist Sts. Parker, Arizona.
= PARKER =
Real Estate and Investments
HOUSES FOR RENT
CURTIS NISBET
542 Chamber Commerce Bldg. LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Home Phone A 1077
A HOLLENBECK HOTEL
Los Angeles
A. C. Bilicke Jno. S. Mitchell
ARIZONA
HEADQUARTERS
Jgg.Wwll IMrlwrggj
• f Rates SI.OO to $1.50. With Private
Bath $1.50 to $3.00.
A. W. Bryant J. W. Martin
PARKER TRANSFER CO.
LIVERY - TRANSFER
FREIGHTING
NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL.
As it is, the lands are not taxable
and any such development would
make them valuable. Somebody with
money would come along and buy
some of us poor devills out, and what
good would that do us? We don’t
know what money is, and we believe
in the old adage which says, “Where
ignorance is bliss, ’tie folly to be
wise,” and in this instance it would
be a great wrong to create any false
ideas on such an innocent lot
of suckers. If we were fools enough
to ever believe that our (?) govern
ment meant anything by word or
promise, except when made to some
political boss, we deserved to be
taught a lesson that will last, through
life.
Another thing. A dam will have to
be built on this “Silvery Colorado”
and it will cause the expenditure of
several millions of dollars that are
safer and less harmful back in the
vaults of New York, and somebody
would naturally want a show for their
money back instead of doing it for
nothing and dying poor themselves,
and it is not right that they should
expect it, besides the damming of
this river and using some of its flood
waters at this time of the year might,
interfere with the old river taking its
annual rampage and washing out the
dykes down at our little neighbour
ing town of Blythe, which if it did
not occur, might cause them to wax
fat and forget what they owe the
Lord, and at the same time it would
deprive that imaginative San Ber
nardino correspondent to the Los An
geles papers of a subject on which to
enlarge so nicely about the people
having to fight “side-winders” for
standing room out on the mesas, etc.
We also believe in NATURE, and
as it is this reservation is an admir
able home for rattlesnakes, coyotes,
and mesquites of -the Bill Taft type
of build.
There are some people who are
fools enough to come to this country
and try to make home hsere, thereby
proving themselves not “competent”
to be judges of their own, welfare, as
against the opinion of some social
istic outsiders, who are, so therefore
we advise our legislators and all
other state and national officers to
heed their “howling” and let things
alone, for fear some mistake might
be made and the reservation might
be opened by the coming of the sec
cond generation of our actual settlers
If poor people want to farm, let
them go over to our suburban town,
Los Angeles, and buy land there for
two or three thousand dollars an
acre. It is inot much worse land than
this and what more do they want?
They can buy their hay and grain
down in that little town in the Salt
river valley, that tries so hard to
imitate Los Angeles. By so doing
they wontt have to work out in the
heat themselves. Their wives can
wash for the money, and Fenix needs
it in her business. Watermelons,
they can do without. Only negroes
THE PARKER POST, SATURDAY, JUNE 22, 1912.
land Southern people eat such fruit,
i Such perverted taste. Forget it.
Anyhow, gentlemen, if has been
| proven that this land will not pro
i duce anything but. alfalfa, corn pota
toes, wheat, garden truck, dates, or
anges, lemons, cantaloupes, melons,
cotton, hogs, cows, chickens, rabbits,
snakes and papooses.
For further proofs of the “greatest
steal ever perpetrated on the people
of Arizona” we respectfully refer you
to one of our dear members of the
legislature who has read the Carey
Land law since he said it. and knows
whereof he speaks.
This epistle was promulgated at t.h<
instance of the Parker board of trade
(a bunch of grafters who were run
out of the country from which they
came, for petit and grand larceny,
wife desertion, bigamy and other of
fenses) by another, who is also a
member of said board and one of the
same ilk, the details of his transgres
sions against society, he is ashamed
to mention, unless it would avoid a
case of contempt, of court, and who
signs himself in this country by the
’subscribed name,
Very respectfully yours,
A. S. PRESCOTT.
IN DIFFICULTIES.
The Humboldt Mining & Milling
company, which recently purchased a
second-hand Huntington mill and
brought it into Whipple Wash, is in
difficulties. It is stated that two
attachments for labor claims have
been levied against the property, and
a number of men returning to Parker
early in the week say that they have
been unable to get their wages.
Frank C. Miller of Humboldt, Kaos.,
is president of the company. He
was in Parker about two weeks ago,
and !r. is stated that, at that time lie
decided to throw up the proposition.
However, the men were kept at work,
and new labor claims aggregating
about S2OOO are awaiting payment.
Mr. Miller is an ice dealer and he is
said to be worth considerable money.
Tiie men who have been working for
tiio company are wondering why he
does rot come through with their
wages. It is likely that other attach
ments will be levied on the mill if
the men are not paid within the
next few days.
f LOCAL NEWS !
*
‘l* *l* »|i »|i i|< i|i fr >|i i|j i*i i|i i| 4 ,|, ( |, [ « i
Donofrio Ice Cream, Saturday and
Sunday. CITY DRUG STORE.
Oscar W. Roberts arrived Tuesday
from the east to look after his cat
tle interests here.
If your business is not worth ad
vertising, advertise it for sale in
The Post. You can get results either
way.
Mrs. Julian Gibson and Miss Clara
Roerts left last, week for a few weeks
visit with friend s -and realitives in
Yavapai county.
Mils. G. C. Dunn and son, John,
departed Friday might of last week
for Pasadena, where they will spend
the summer visiting Mrs. Dunn’s par
ents.
Puritan Greaseless Peroxized Cream,
the Summer Cream De Luxe, same
formula and size as famous r*o cent
cream, only 25 cents at City Drug
Store.
The local baseball team received a
challenge from the Wiekcnburg ag
gregation Monday for a game to be
played at Wiiickamburg on the Fourth
of July. As the home team never
takes a dare of this kind, am accep
tance will probably he decided upon
at a meeting to he held tonight. Hav
ing three victories to their credit
from this team, the locals are not
worrying much over the outcome of
the game on the Fourth.
W. E. Scott, postmaster and mer
chant of Quartzisiite, was in town
Wednesday, having come over from
ihe placer camp to consult with Sup
erintendent Babcock regarding cer
tain mining claims now included with
in the reservation boundary lines ow
ing to their extension by the last sur
vey. He is confident that the govern
ment will straighten the matter mil
at an early date. Mr. Scott states
that the Cinnabar company has u
force of twelve men at work, and
that about fifteen jnen are engaged
in placer mining in that vicinity.
James Lighitfoot of Bloomington
Gal., arrived here Monday morning,
and left the next day for Copper Ba
sin to examine mining property In
that d'-trict. Mr. Light foot formerly
resided here and expects to retturn
just as soon as the reservation lands
become available to settlement. He
is it present engaged in fruit rais
ing, and thoughtfully remembered
The Post by bringing us a plentiful
supply of oranges and grape fruit
from hiis orehal'd. Mr. Lightfoot. re
turned home Thursday accompanied
by his grandchild. Miss Ethel May
Price.
A. S. Prescott spent several days
in Phoenix the fore part of the
week. While there he met Mr. Peirce
who is promoting the Parker & Colo
rado River railroad and who had just
arrived from a trip to Washington,
where lie had been arranging for a
right-of way for the road through
the reservation. Mr. Prescott states
that Mr. Peirce is very optimistic
over the early opening of the reserva
tion, and that Peirce stated that his
companj was ready to start building
the road as soon as the lands are
applicable to the new Carey act re
cently passed by the state legislature.
Houses for Rent, Furnished and
Unfurnished.
G. A. MARSH COMPANY.
CHAUTAUQUA IN MILE-HIGH CITY
PRESCOTT, June 20—“ Go West,
young man —and fight Indians and
then if you survive that dry up with
the country ’ Thirty years ago the
facetious peddler of useless advice
considered the above his brightest re
in-1 l:. Today the only real Indians
belon° to the various wild shows and
the rceir med lands of Arizona bid
fair to be among the most fertile in
the union.
The effete easterner may perhaps
agree to the above but wore you to
tell him that Arizona has as fine a
school system as any state in the
w-os and that her mountain resort,
Prescott, has inaugurated the first
Chautauqua course in the new state
you would perhaps astonish, the gen
tleman who is imbued with the idea
that the west is an uncultured wri
de- ness.
On Saturday the fifteen day course
Wck formally opened and for the fol
lowing fifteen days there will be
three entertainments each day. Men
like John Mitchell, Governor Buchtel,
and Bishop Hughes are among the
speakers. The Cambridge players and
many other attractions will be on the
program, which lasts from the 15th
until the 30t.1i of June.
The pavilion has a seating capacity
of 2000 and there are living accom
modations in Pine Crest for those
who enjoy camping.
Prescott is at its best; its undis
puted summer climate is more de
lightful than ever and the accommo
dations which are at hand combined
with the superior list of entertain
ments and reduced railroad fares
promise that the first chautauqua It'
be held in Arizona will equal m’i
efforts of our eastern brothers along
the same lines.
Subscribe for The Post..
Parker Commercial Co.
Reliable Goods, fair Prices
Courteous Treatment
We handle the Best Groceries to be Had
OUR HAMS, BACON AND LARD ARE ALWAYS FRESH. OUR TEAS
AND COFFEES ARE THE BEST. OUR EGGS AND BUTTER ARE THE
FRESHEST. OUR CANNED GOODS ARE THE LATEST PACK AND
OF THE STANDARD AND EXTRA STANDARD QUALITY.
WE CARRY A LINE OF
Dry Goods, Notions, hats, Shoes
Hardware, Cutlery, Furniture
Paints, Oils, hay
and Grain
Our Prices are Just* and Right
Parker Commercial Co.
PARKER., ARIZONA
Which farm do you want?
Are you going to let Uncle Sam
give you a farm in the Great Colo
rado River Valley at Parker. 150,-
000 acres of rich,level valley land to
be opened up in this valley soon. Ev
ery acre accurately described in the
SETTLERS’ MAP
which I ihave just published. With
this map is a written description of
the soil and topography of eviery acre
of land. Also complete information
on Parker project. The map shows:
FRUIT LAND FARM LAND OVERFLOW LAND
ALKALI SPOTS SAND DUNNES WATER-HOLES
MESA LAND COLORADO RIVER SLOUGHS ROADS
VARIETY AND DENSITY OF TIMBER LOCATION OF MINES.
1 compiled this map and data dur
ing five months cruise of the land
as surveyor. It is the only complete,
descriptive map of Parker valley pub
lished. Worth more than a trip to
the valley.
PRICE, postpaid, $2.00.
RANDALL HENDERSON - Box 301. Parker, Arizona
The COMMERCIAL Bank
\
Os PARKER, ARIZONA
Safe and Conservative
Solicits Your Business
Come and See Us
All That, It>s Name Implies
CITY DRUG STORE
Your patronage always appreciated

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