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The Parker post. (Parker, Ariz.) 1910-1918, April 13, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060922/1918-04-13/ed-1/seq-3/

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save
1-
uye more corn
2- , ri
tifP more fish & beans
3-
Just enough
4- sugar *
O use syrups
and serve
the cause of freedom
US. FOOD ADMINIS TRATION
limiwitsV&ste
miimi JM mm* ACKIES in the Amerl
can navy are classed
one of the cooks on the
North Dakota is oper
ffljjjnfypi a ting a meat slicer that
cuts bacon with the
- least possible wastage.
Eat is fuel for fighters. Bacon is
badly needed In the allied armies and
navies. The allied needs in pork prod
ucts are 150,000,000 pounds monthly,
three times as much as before the war.
Another waste eliminator on the North
Dakota is the potato peeler, shown in
the lower photo. Nothing is lost ex
cept the actual potato skin.
There is a sufficient quantity of po
EVERYONE MUST HELP.
Wars cannot be fought without money, and upon the Treasury centers
every financial demand upon the Nation.
The rich of this country cannot alone meet the needs of the Nation; r
the men of the country cannot do it alone; the women of the country
cannot do it alone; but all of us, the people of the United States, disre
garding partizanshlp, forgetting selfish interests, thinking only of the
supremacy of right and determining to vindicate the majesty of American
Ideals and secure the safety of America and civilization, can do the great
and splendid work which God has called upon us to do.
W. G. McADOO,
Secretary of the Treasury.
Plan 'Your Garden Now*
Save Time and Money.
fair QL/RFxpo/?r Fooi?
N CITY and country more war gardens are needed this year
'Wj m than ever before. Patriotism prompted 2,000,000 Americans
H t 0 piant S ar duns last year, according to estimates of the
aw ■ United States Department of Agriculture. Transportation
pg facilities of the nation will be strained this year hauling muni
tions of war and foods for the Allies. The surplus food ci»-
at ed by home gardens will help in the railroad problem. And
na^on w dl eat less of the goods we must export— wheat,
meat, fats and sugar. Every boy and girl that helps with tha
garden is helping win the war. Leaflets of instruction in
garden making may be secured from the Department of Agriculture at Wash
ington, upon request, without charge.
tatoes in America for greater use In
every home and for all needs of army
and navy. Eat more potatoes, eat
less wheat.
H
SKELETONS OF STONE AGE
Bones of Early People of Japan Show
They Were Six to Seven Feet
in Height.
Fifteen human skeletons were un
earthed in the province of Kawachi,
near Osaka. This is considered the
birthplace of Japanese civilization. Os
the relics of the Japanese stone age,
discovered by Professor Okushi, nine
of the skeletons were In perfect preser
vation, all bones being intact, East and
West News says. It rarely happens,
according to scientific records, that so
many perfect skeletons are discovered
In one place.
Among indications that people of
that period lived on uncooked food, is
the fact that upper and lower teeth
arc evenly worn down. Decayed teeth
are not found. The bony structure of
the skeletons are massive; shin bones,
In most cases, are somewhat flat. Some
ot these skeletons stand seven feet
high; even shorter ones are over six
feet! Skeletons were found in a lying
position, with knees drawn up. With
out doubt, these people belonged to
the stone age in Japan—3o,ooo years
ago, at least.
While making the excavation, Stone
implements, earthenware and two cop
per arrowheads were found. Two white
jade earrings were discovered which
may be of Chinese origin, and of a
much later period. It is thought this
find may establish a link between the
sr» ne and bronze ages in prehistoric
Japan. Archeologists hold that It
surely indicates the early people of
Japan had Intercourse with other parts
of Asia. The earthenware patterns
are not necessarily Ainu; the bones
eaanot possibly be those of Alnus.
This discovery revolutionizes archeo
logical theories of prehistoric Japan.
WHEN ONE IS STRICKEN DEAF
Affliction Accompanied by Depression
Strangely and intensely Over
powering, Says Writer.
The invariable depression that comes
wi ch the beginning of deafness Is
strangely and intensely overpowering.,
It exists sometimes indefinitely. The
word depression, as commonly used,
admits of varied shades of meaning,
writes Margaret Baldwin, in the At
lantic. It all but carries with it a
vague impression of lack of will-power,
a more or less voluntary indifference to
moral effect. But let no one suppose
that its use here indicates any mere
dull, dispirited outlook on life, or any
other voluntary mental view of one’s
self or one’s future. There is nothing
voluntary about It.
It is a feeling deeply physical as well
as mental —a mingled condition of woe
ful sickness and sadness that beggars
description. The distress and shock
over what has happened to one and
the first experience of what it is like,
is the initial factor; But considering
what it ought to be as compared with
the shock of blindness, which, it seems
to me, must be sufficient to produce
permanent blackest despair, the de
pression of deafness is out of all pro
portion.
Marriage or a Career,
A woman writer, herself married
and twenty-three years of age, states
that a woman who expects to follow
an intellectual life should marry young
This is a sound: view, for the woman
who fully Appraises the value of her
intellectual life realizes-that the best
years of the mind -are those that come
after the age of most efficient child
bearing. It is a very different view
from that of the young women in pro
fessions which serve only to bridge the
few brief years between school days
and marriage, and for whom marriage
closes for all time participation in the
world's work outside of the home.
Clearly we can never have an intel
lectual emancipation in the world's
work on a program that would confine
professional life to remarriage
days or make it incompatible with
marriage. The first gives too brief a
period and must subordinate woman
to inferior clerical labor, while the
second would win intellectuality at the
sacrifice of normal life and confine
participation in the world’s affairs to
a small and abnormal group of womnn.
—Physical Culture.
Dislikes of Hens.
“Hens are funny sorts of creatures,”
observes a poultry fancier. “They
have their likes and dislikes—especial
ly dislikes. If you move a hen she
turns crusty, and won’t lay eggs. She
likes her old home, and takes an abom
inable time to get used to the new.
“If you wave a cloth within sight of
the occupants of your fowl run, you
will hear a shocking row. This par
ticular noise is known as the ‘danger
signal,’ and sometimes will he indulged
j in without a single break for as long
as 20 minutes,
“If you take it into your head to re
arrange the nest boxes, depend upon
it Biddy will pay you out. She will
miss that day with her usual egg.
“Provided they are good, it’s Wisest
to stick to old things In poultry-keep
ing, and not to shift them unless you
are compelled to do so. At least,
there’s one thing you can change, and
f that’s the fodder. Hens won’t object
I to that at all; in fact, they like it,”
■ ■■ » ■ —.
Haughty Youngster.
James was starting out with hie
mother and the new baby. The bat>y
\va« put into the cab which had for
merly been used for James, Feeling
that it belonged to him, he protested
that he should ride, but was told that
lie must let the baby have the cab. He
j stopped short and said, “Well, I’ll call
P4JUEEK POST.
m
The Inevitable.
**l lost my pocketbook yesterday.”
“Much money In It?”
“Fifty cents and some car tickets.”
“I wouldn’t worry about that If I
were you.”
“I don’t mind the loss at all, but
when my husband finds It out he’ll
spend most of his time for years to
come telling all our friends how care
less I am with his money.”—Detroit
Free Press.
No Great Student.
“I must have a part for Tottle Flub
dub. In the last revue she used to say
‘Hurrah for the prince!’ Couldn’t you
write that Into this play?”
“There is no prince In this play. We
might have her say, ‘Hurrah, boys;
here conies the handsome captain!’” :
‘‘l don’t think she could learn that
long a part.”—Louisville Courier-Jour*
nal. ra
o.
How He Knew.
“What's that your daughter's playin’,
on the melodeon, Hiram?”
“Oh, that’s ‘Old Black Joe,’ Zekiel.”
“But It doesn’t sound like it, Hi
ram.”
“No, I know it don’t, Zekiel.”
“How do you-know It’s ‘Old Black
Joe,’ then, Hiram?”
“ ’Cause It’s the only piece she
knows; that’s how, Zekiel!”
Guineas Proposal.
"Do you love me?” asked the young
man, boldly.
“Isn’t this rather sudden, Mr. Hug
gins?” replied the sweet young thing.
“Can’t you give me a week to consider
my answer?”
“No, I can’t. I have an option on
another girl, and the option expires to
morrow I”
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
026361
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Phoenix, Arizona,
March 30, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Edwin
F, Graham, of Bouse, Arizona, who,
on May 25, 1915, made Homestead
Entry No. 026361, for
Section 15, Township 7 N, Range 17
W, G. & S. R. B. & Meridian, has
filed notice of Intention to make
three year proof, to establish claim
to the land above described, before
Mulford Winsor, U. S. Commissioner,
at Yuma, Arizona, on the 7th day of
May, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
George Y. Lee, Charles T. Cowell*
Thomas Bouse, William E. Enos, a<j
of Bouse, Arizona. a-
JOHN L. IRVIN, Register. 0
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
015952
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Phoenix, Arizona*
March 16, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Pedro
Aguallo, of Wenden, Arizona, who,
on November 6, 1911, made Home
stead Entry No. 015952, for
NW%, NE%SW%', SW-
Section 6, Township 5 N,
Range 12 W, G. & S. R. B. & Meri
dian, has filed notice of intention to
make five-year proof, to establish
claim to the land above described,
before the Register & Receiver, U.S.
Land Office, at Phoenix, Arizona, on
the 24th day of April, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Frank Lucas, Landy E. Ehle, Ed,-
Madison, J. A. Reed, all of Wenden,
Arizona.
JOHN L- IRVIN. /’
Register.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
026641
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Phoenix, Arizona,
March 16, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that Edward
W. Bedford, of Salome, Arizona, who,
on January 30, 1915, made Home
stead Entry Nq. 026641, for
Ny 2 SEVi, SWI4SEV4, Section 14,
Township 5 N, Range 13 W, G. & S.
R. B. & Meridian, has filed notice of
intention to make three-year proof,
to establish claim to the land above
described, before the Register & Re
ceiver, U. S. Land Office, at Phoenix,
Arizona, on the 23rd day of April,
!918. I
Claimant names as witnesses: C,
S. Smith, Mrs. C. S. Smith, C. Cree
ser, all 3 of Phoenix, Arizona, E. G,
Harrington, of Wenden, Arizona.
JOHN L. IRVIN,
Register.
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Two-Fifty
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PAGE THREE

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