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The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, January 15, 1879, Image 4

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The Solid DfBiocmtlc Pnriy.
TTe entcrtuia the opinion that the
following article should be read by
Bepubli-ans as well us Democrats,
and that one parly has no right to
monopolise nil the food political
literature:
Let uo Democrat be troubled by
the Radical ontcry over tho solid
South. It is a legitimate political
product. It represents one hundred
and thirty-eight votes in the elec
toral college, ninety-six votes in the
Federal House, and thirty in the
Senate. With this compact, reliable
power at its command tho Demo
cratic party needs only the exercise
of common sagacity and honesty in
the administration of public and
party affairs to triumphantly rule
this couutry for the next two gen
erations. The great problem with the Radi
cal party was to prevent the forma
tion of a solid Democratic South.
In this they have most signally fail
ed. Ilence they naturally think "the
fruits of the war" have been lost to
them. That they howl, gnash their
teeth and threaten dreadful conse
quences is au exhibition of impotent
rage. They did their worst jears
ago, when the South was prostrate
aud out of all political relations
with the Democracy of the North.
Now the tables are reversed. The
solid South is in full communion
with the Union and the Democratic
party. This party is once again a
Gibraltar of strength, both for de
feucc and assault. Strong as it was
in tho first eighty years of the
Union, and in its sixty years of
political domination in Federal af- j
fairs, it is physically and potentially
stronger to-day. It is the greatest
political force in the world. Taken
for all purposes, its equal iu politi
cal power has never existed.
It owes its reinvigoratiou and re
newed powerfuluess to the senti
ment and causes which have solidi
fied the Southern states. Cut, turn
ing from this point of observation,
from its compact one hundred and
thirty-eight electoral vote?, look at
its strength iu the north. It divides
nearly equally the governments of
tho Northern states, aud, with the
exception of four or five, every
Northern state is a battle ground,
where a chungc of one per cent, of
the popular vole decides which of
the two master parlies shall control
it.
It is to this all potential party that
all men with popular ideas aud in
stincts will eventually rally. Those
who have gone into Independent or
third party movements have met
only disappointments. Their move
ments have not only come to the
grief of defeat, but to that of utter
dissolution. Repeated effort has
ended only in repeating warning
agaiust the folly of such blunders.
The popular leaning and instincts of
the Democratic party are too strong
and earnest for any third party suc
cess that looks to socialistic or
democratic sentiment. All that is
practical in that direction can be,
and will be, accomplished in aud
through the organized Democracy.
Recognition of this existing force
aud fact will hasten the day of
Democratic control in the Federal
affairs. But that is not all. The
co-operation of the socialistic forces
will leaven the Democratic party
and carry it boldly along in the im
mense work of undoing the results
6ummed up in the term "new na
tion." Louisville Democrat.
Wohiuh'm KcNtlcinc aud !!
COUU'HI.
It is highly improbable that such
an individual as a perfectly satisfied,
contented woman exists. It there
bo one whose position in society
and general surrouudings are entire
ly in accord with her ambition and
desires, the happy creature has not
yet been discovered, aud her pleas
ing and beneficial example has been
lost upon her discontented sisters.
In whatever condition or circum
stances she may be placed, there is
invariably something beyond her
reach that is essential to her happi
ness. This condition of affairs has
existed throughout all time. "We
are told that the garden of Eden
possessed every possible condition
requisite for the complete happiness
of its occupants. There is no doubt
that their condition was infinitely
better than that of any inhab
itants of this mundane sphere to
day, aud that they should have been
supremely happy and contented,
but whether it was from tho lack
of dressmakers or other causes which
history doe6 not record, our fair
mother Eve would not rest satisfied,
but must needs seek for something
more. Thus it has been ever since,
and the coustaut, restless striving
after objects which she docs not
possess has been the cause of much
of woman's uuhappincss. Albany
Times.
A blind man was sitting in com
pany with some visitors a few weeks
ago, when one of the party left the
room. "What white teeth that lady
has," 6aid the bliud man. "How
can you tell that?" asked a friend.
'"Because," was the ready auswer,
"for the last half-hour she has been
doing nothing but laugh.
Martha Washington was the only
woman who ever enjoyed the frank
ing privilege in this republic
April 3, 1800, after her husband's
death, Congress gave her free use
of tho mails during the rest of hex-life.
Chcexe Factory.
"West Point is becoming famous
as a manufacturing point, having
now a butter aud cheese factory, a
furniture factory and a paper mill.
From the Omaha Bee we clip the
following reference to the cheese
factory, which will be interesting to
many of our readers, as Nebraska is
destined to take a place in the front
rank of States devoted to tbia in
dustry :
It is located bnt a short distance
from town, on the road to Tfikamah,
and coubistsof a series of new, well
built, wooden structures including
bams, pens, and factory proper, the
whole a frontage of 280 feet, with
wings 66 ft. to 78 ft. in depth. The
total number of stock in the barns
i6 250some of them imported Jerseys
and Guernseys, others full blooded
Durhams and the balance graded
Durhams, Ayrshites, aud the best
specimens of common nativo stock.
Iu the bull barn, are "Bashaw," a
Guernsey, aud "Goldust" a Jersey,
with a good Durham, though un
recorded. In the first cow-barn are
four imported Jersey heifers,
amongst them "Sister Hand,"
bought in New York, by the associa
tion before she had left her stall on
shipboard. Others of the same
breed, but not so distinguished,
staud side by side with "Sister
Hand," and with their velvety eyes
aud deer-like hides and limbs, con
stitute a very attractive picture.
The milking qualities of these ani
mals give them the preference over
all other kinds for the object con
templated by the association, and
most of the stock raised here iu the
future will be crossed with them.
The anaugements lor caring for the
stock seem as nearly perfect as pos
sible. An aisle six or seveu feet
wide traverses the leuglh of each
barn. The animals are fastened by
the old 6lauchiou plan, facing to
ward the aisle. Immediately be
fore them run loug troughs, in
which they are fed ground corn
and barley. The bottoms of the
feed troughs are in sections, and
when raised expose the water
troughs. The water is brought in
pipes from a spring, 3,000 feet away
iu the bluff's, is carried under the
floors of the barns, and at stated in
tervals is let into the troughs by
means of taps. When the animals
arc satisfied the rest is conducted
away from the buildings. Except
on stormy days the cows are let out
into large yards for exercise, and
during this time their s'alls arc
thoroughly cleaned and the manure
carted away.
At some distance from the barn is
the factory. The process of making
butter and cheeEC need not occupy
space. The building contains a
milk room with a 600 gallon bath
aud cooler, aud a gang press for
cheese, a butter room with Blanch
ard revolving churns, a cheese cur
ing room, a store room, bath room
for the hands, and a room for mak
ing cheese boxes. Instead of man
ual labor in the processes involved,
an upright engine of 5-horse power
supplies the means for heating,
churning, pressing, curing and
cleansing.
The first batch of cheese was made
on the 17th hist. 3Ir. J. J. King is
superintendent of this enterprise
which involved an expenditure of
$40,000, employs eight teams and
thirty-live men. Five huudred hogs
arc kept upon the waste of the
creamery with some meal in addi
tion. 1 inter Treuiment of Poultry.
A correspondent saysjn brief that
each fowl ought to produce 160
eggs a year; that iu winter warmth
is inditpeusiblc; that the fowls
must have some of the food they
find at other seasons when at large;
that they must have plenty of room
iu their house, aud it and the laying
boxes kept clean; that they must be
fed corn, barley, oals, have a box of
sand, oyster or clam shells pounded
up, or old mortar, or bones dried
aud pounded fine; that mashed
boiled potatoes aud corn meal are
excellent; that fatty matter of any
kind, fresh beef, or pork scraps, &c,
must forma portion of their diet;
that hens are fond of vegetable
matter during winter and will eat
cabbage, &c , and that they must be
kept free from vermin, which nearly
always follows entire cleanliness.
In case, however, vermin should
still make their appearance, there is
nothing so effective iu removing
them as rubbiug the top of the head,
under the wings and upon the backs,
with lard. These suggestions we
have made time and again ; and
have only to add now, that all who
desire complete success, and of
course satisfactory profit from
poultry raising, must adopt them.
Exchange.
Climbed the Golden Stair.
Tut away the little discount
That our Greenback used to wear,
He will need the badge no longer,
He has climbed the Golden stair.
Gone to meet Old Bullion.
JVeto York Graphic.
Let us carefully observe those
good qualities wherein our enemies
excel us aud endeaver to excel them
by avoiding what is faulty, and im
itating what is excellent in them.
The Indiana supreme court has
decided, in the suit of a church
against a member, that subscrip-
j tion6 made on Sunday canuot be
i collected by law.
Lincoln.
Jakcauy 7, 1879.
Dear Journal: Being here for
a few days, I thought a few notes
from the Capital would be interest
ing. " The Commercial " is full of
Representatives aud Senators,
amongst whom I notice the well
known and pleasant faces of D. C.
Loveland and T. C. Ryan of Colum
bus, and I don't think the interests
of yonr city will be forgotten by
them. Our gentlemanly Senator J.
T. Clarkson is also there and Rep
resentative N. W. Wells of Schuy
ler. Quite an army of office-seekers
also, and the hubbub reminds one
of Stock Exchange in a panic. Sen
atorial nominations of officers aud
subordinate positions made by cau
cus yesterday evening, and work
begins to-day at noon. A very few
happy faces and a great many dis
appointed ones. Reporters running
round aud a general lively time.
I also had the pleasure of hearing
the best choir in the State (a quar
tette) in the Episcopal chinch on
Sunday last, and I find Lincoln a
very pleasant place to spend a few
days in. Am stopping with an old
time friend, Guy A. Brown, Clerk of
the Supreme Court, and have met
many old Omaha friends. In my
next will give any information that
will inteiest the county at large, at
present cau't, as nothing definite
has been done. Governor Nance is
one of the many genial men here,
aud his pleasant face is not easily
forgotten, and must win him great
popularity. New houses springing
up in every direction, and they with
the government buildings make
Lincoln a very fine city for the wect.
The Commercial Hotel is a very
handsome and complete building
aud any one stopping in Lincoln
will find ample and courteous ac
commodation. More anon.
Respectfully,
Treboh Envap.
The I-ndy or Culture.
The first element of a true culture
is utility. The homoly uses of life
are the sfrong body, without which
accomplishments have nothing to
adorn but themselves, and are
thrown away. In the swift fluctu
ation of business, and the terrible
reverses which so often sweep away
the best founded fortunes, none are
safe. It is folly for any family to
rear a girl in the lap of indulgence
for a life of luxury, when a single
wave of misfortune may sweep the
Castle Beautiful away and leave its
inmates at the mercy of the pitiless
elements. Every girl should be so
educated that, should adversity
throw her upon the world, she will
fall, like the cat, on her feet, ready
for a run on her own account. A
lady of culture is one who can use
her knowledge and accomplish
ments for her own support in case
of need, and does not feel that any
useful industry is demeaning. The
practical must precede and support
the ornamental, and even the orna
mental should be so thoroughly in
grained that it can be made use of
in case of need. The worst evils of
modern society will not be got rid
of till every woman is able to earn
an honest livelihood, aud respects
every other woman who earns one,
whether she is a " lady of culture "
or not. Leslie's Illustrated News
paper. Get Enough Mlecp.
We have often heard young men
remark that Ave hours of sleep was
all they wanted, and all that the hu
man system required. The habit ol
going without sleep is very injuri
ous. Thousands, no doubt, perma
nently injure their health in this
way. "We live in a fast age, when
everybody seems to be trjiug to
invert the order of nature. If folks
will persist in turning night into
day, it is not to be wondered at that
few lust out the allotted term of life.
No matter what be a man's occupa
tionphysical or mental, or, like
Othello's, "gone," and living in idle
ness the constitution cannot last,
depend upon it, without a sufficien
cy of regular and refreshing bleep.
John Hunter, the great surgroiylied
suddenly of spasmodic affection of
the heart, a disease greatly encour
aged by want of sleep. In a recent
ly published volume by a medical
man, there is one great lesson that
hard students and literary men may
learn, and that is Hunter probably
killed himselr by taking too little
sleep. "Four hours rest at night
and one after dinner, cannot be
deemed sufficient to recruit the ex
hausted powers of body and mind."
Certainly not: and the consequence
was that Hunter died early. If men
will insist on cheating Sleep, her
"twin-sister, Death," will avenge
the insult.
"I want to find out who is the
master of this house," said the man
with a book under his arm to the
vinegary -looking woman with a
pointed nose and a very small top
knot, who opened the door for him.
"Well, stranger," she said, with
arms akimbo, "you just walk around
into the back-yard and ask a little
spindle-shanked deacon you'll find
there fixin' up the grape-arbor, and
he'll tell you if I don't boss this
ranche he don't know who does.
Now, what do you want with me?"
Don't write long obituaries. Save
some of your kind words for the
Hviuff.
The Sort of Girl to Get.
The true girl has to be sought for.
She does not parade herself as show
goods. She is not fashionable.
Generally, she is not rich. But, oh!
what a heart she has when you find
her I So large and pure and wo
manly. When you see it yon won
der if those showy things outside
were women. If you gain her love
your two thousand are millions.
She'll not ask you tor a carriage or
a first-class house. She'll wear sim
ple dresses ami turn them when
necessary, with uo vulgar magnificat
to frown upon her economy. She'll
keep everything neat and nice in
your sky parlor, and give you tuch
a welcome when you come home
that you'll think your parlor higher
than ever. She'll entertain true
friends with a dollar, and, astonish
you with the new thought how little
depends upon money. She'll make
you love home (if you don't you're
a brute), and teach you how to pity,
while you scorn a poor, fashionable
society that thinks itself rich, and
vainly tries to think itself happy.
Now, do not, I pray you, say any
more, " I can't afford to marry."
Go find the true woman aud you
can. Throw 'away that cigar, burn
up that switch-cane, be sensible
yourself, and seek your wife in a
sensible way. Oliver Wendell
Holmes.
He had broken his promises to
marry the girl, and her father want
ed a money consideration to help
heal a wounded heart. The young
man said he would consider a reas
onable proposition. "Well, then,"
said the irate father, who was seek
ing justice for his daughter, 'young
man, how does a dollar and a half
strike you !"'
Don't publish your acts of chari
ty. The Lird will keep the ac
count straight.
QQZt&ixmvm
STATE BANK,
Cs::c!:r: is Gcrr ri Eeci i 7u:c Ealrt.
COLUMBUS, NEBRASKA
CASH CAPITAL,
$50,000
MRKCTOKs:
Leandeb Uekhakd, Pro, '.
Gko. "W. II UL3T, Vice Pes'
Julius A Heed.
Edward A. Gkkkakd.
Akxek Turner, Cashier.
Hunk of Deposit UiNcounl
and Exchange.
Collection I'roinplly 31ndc on
all Point.
Pay Interest on Time Depos
itN. 271.
CITY MEAT MARKET,
ON
OI.IVC ST.. OPrOSITK IIAJI
M .! HOUSE.
Will keep on Iiand all kinds ol Fresh
and Salt Meats, also Sausage, Poultry
Fre-h Finn, etc., all in their season.
Cash paid for Hides, Lard an Ra
con. WILL.T. KICKLY.
CENTRAL MAT MARKET
K litis STREET.
Dealers in Fresh and Salted Meats.
Ac. Tovn Lots, Wood. Hides, Ac.
J. KICKLY, Agent.
Columbus, June 1. 1877.
NEBRASKA HOUSE,
S. J. MARMOY, Prop'r.
Nebraska Ave., South of Depot,
COIMj.TlRljg, 31 EB.
A nsw house, newly furnished. Good
accommodations. II nurd hy day or
week at reasonable rates.
aSel n. Firat-CInas Tnble.
Meals, SC Cants. I Latirlngs 26 Cts
JK.JK
UIYIO.X PACIFIC
LAND OFFICE,
SAMUEL C. SMITH Agent,
ATTEXDS TO ALL BUSINESS per
tainininp to a general Keal Estate
Agency and .Notary Public. Have in
structions and blanks furnished by
United States Land Office for making
final proof on Homesteads, thereby sav
ing a trip to Grand Island. Have a large
number ol farms, city lots and all lands
belonging to U P. E. R. in Platte and
adjoining counties for sale very cheap.
Attend to contesting claims before U. S.
Land office.
Ollee one Door TTest of namooad Hoaas,
COLUMBUS, NEB.
F. W. OTT, Clerk.
?pki lriBn.
THE
Albion Mills.
SACKET & CROUCH,
Albion, Neb.
The proprietor are practical millers,
attend
an J they
to the
griRUing
themselves.
DEFY COMPETITION!
FurnUbed with the latest unproved
machinery, they are prepared to do all
kinds of
CUSTOM AMD MERCHANT TORI
RYE AND FEED
GROUND EVERY DAY.
CORN MEAL
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
"We make several brands of
lour
But recommend to the trade our AL
HION MILLS
ii
STAR" BRAND,
If is a superior article made
CHOICE SELECTED WHEAT.
35.1
from
ii
YOU BET.
))
A. W. LAWRENCE,
AGENT FOll THE
S5j
r
WIND MILL,
Will hereafter be found TIlItEE
DOORS SOUTH of the Post Office,
where he keeps a full line of every style
PUMP. PIPE, HOSE,
And the Celebrated
I X L FEED MILL.
As he krep a Pump Home xcliii vcly,
he is able to sell CHEAPER THAN'
THE CHEAPEST. Pumps for any
depth well. Pumps driven or repaired,
aud Rods cut.
GIVE IIDI
350
i CALL 1D SATE MO.NEY.
BECKER & WELCH,
PB0PEIET0ES OF
SHELL CREEK MILLS.
MANUFACTURERS &. WHOLE
SALE DEALERS IN
FLOUR AND MEAL.
OFFICE, COL UJfJ US, KEB.
Dr. A. HEINTZ,
DEAI.KR IN
n
wi.m:s, B.iti;oies,
Fine Soaps, Brushes,
PERFUMERY, Etc., Etc.,
And all articles iimuIIv kept on hand by
DrucgiDts.
Physicians Prescriptions Carefully
Compounded.
One door I2si.sC (if Galley's, on
Eleven (Ii Ktreet,
COLUMBUS.
NEBRASKA
B.OSmiBSI
NEW STOKE
AND-
New Stock.
A full, freh lupply of grocerici,
STAPLE AND FANCY,
JiiRt opened, and for alc at low-down
prices.
X3TOIlTe Street, oppoxite the
"Tatternll."
james McAllister.
Wm. SOH3LZ,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
BOOTS AND SHOES!
A couplets assortment or Lanln' aad Chil
dren's Shoe kept on hand.
Ail Work Warranted!!
Oar Motto Good stock, excellent
work and fair prices.
Especial Attention paid to Bepairiiig.
Cor. OIItc aad 19th 8t.
RRX
1878.
THE
jolmtihts gjotmml
It conducted as a
FAMILY NEWSPAPER,
Devoted to the best mutual inter
eats of its readers and its publish
ers. Published at CoIiinibu.i'I:itte
county, the centre of the agricul
tural porti n of Nebraska, it is read
by hundreds of people cnt who arc
looking towards Nebraska as their
future home. Its tmltscribera in
Nebraska are the staunch, solid
portion of the community, ai is
evidenced by the fact that the
Journal has never contained a
"dun" againat them, and by the
other fact that
ADVERTISING
In its columns always brings its
reward. Business is business, and
those who wish to reach the 6oIid
people of Central Nebraska will
find the columns of the Journal a
splendid medium.
JOB WORK
Of all kinds neatly and quickly
done, at fair prices. This species
of printing is nearly always want
ed in a hurry, and, knowing this
fact, we have so provided for it
that we ci" furnish envelope, let
ter hendh, bill heads, circulars,
posters, etc., etc., on very short
notice, and promptly on time as
we promise.
SUBSCRIPTION.
copy per annum
" Six moutliK
" Three months,
$2 00
. 1 00
. 50
Siii'rlc copy sent 10 any addrcfc
in the United States for 5 tits.
M. Z. TURNER & CO.,
ColunibtH, Nebraoka.
1870.
J OH IV WIGGINS,
WHOLESALE AND
H AM PWAR 15 f
STOVES. IKON, TLWARE.
Nails, Rope, Wagon Material, glass, Paint, Etc.,
CORAF.R l'U:i'i:TII
COLUMBUS,
C. B. STTLLMAN,
Wholesale and
MUGS, MEDICLME, PALYLU OILS.
AVXiSTDOAV" GLASS,
PERFUMERY, PATENT MEDICINES. ETC.
Keeps on hand all article" iinally kept In a lirt-clas Iru;r Store. Dealer
in surroundinjr country will find it'to their intercut to purchase from him. a he
can and will give IJKD-ROCIv PRICES.
Prescriptions Carefullv Corn-pounded.
MTA UUUU AsSUKlJliiAl VI ALil.
353
S AF"ES 1
The Celebrated Diebold, Norris & Go's
(Late D'cbold & Kicuzle,)
Fire
and Burglar Proof!
HAVE THE BEST
All leading Railroa i I Ezprsss Companies
Not One Lost in the Two Great Fires in Chicago; alio preserved the content
in every instance, at Independence, Iowa: at Central City, Col.; at
Oshkoib, "Wis., and at all places have atood the test, without failure.
All Sizes for Sale and Made to Order. Old Safes taken in Exchange.
County and Bank Work n.
Good Work
D. S. C0VENT, GENERAL AGENT, CHICAGO.
WILL. B. DALE, Agent,
234
Formerly Pacific House.
Thia popular house has been newly
Refitted and Furnished.
Meals &cts.
Day Board per week,. . . $1.00.
Board and Lodging, 5 and ?6.
Good Livery and Feed Stable in con
nection. SATISFA TION GUARANTEED.
JOHN HAMMOND,
l'roprlctor.
Chicago & North-western
The Great Trunk Lino from the YFrt to
Chicago and the East.
It Is the oldest, shortest, most direct. oonTenlcnt,
comfortable and in every respect the best line 70a
can take. It Is tho greatest and Rrandest RalhraT
organization in the United States. It owns or
controls
2100 MILES OF RAILWAY
PCXXXAX HOTEL OARS re ran tea
by It through between
COUNCIL BLUrra Jb CHICAGO I
No other road rnna Pullman Ilotel Cart, or any
other form of Hotel Cart, through, between tho
Ulasoori filver and Chicago.
PASSENGERS COKiG EAST should bar
fc mind that this lathe
BEST ROUTEWCHICAGO
AND ALL POINTS EAST.
Passengers by this route haye choice of FITS
DIFFERENT BOOTES and the adrantags of
Elxht Dally IJnea l'alace Sleeping: Cars
from CHICAGO to
PHILADELPHIA AND NEW YORK,
AND OTHER EASTERN POINTS.
Insist that the Ticket Agent tells jou tickets by
the North-Western Road. Examine your Tickets,
and refuse to bur if they do not read orer this Road.
All Agents sell them kud Check usual Baggage
Free by this Line.
Through Ticket Tia this Routs to all Eastern
I Points can be procurtd at the Central Pacific Rail
road Ticket Office, foot of Market Street, and at
I New Montgomery Mreet, Han Franr isco, and at
aX oupon Ticket Offlccs or Central Pacific, Union
Pacific, and all Western Railroads.
I New York Office, No. 415 Broadway. Boston
Office. No. 6 State Street. Omaha Office, 345 Farn-
baaa Street. San Francisco Office, it New Mont-
I gomery Street. Cblcsgo Ticket Offices : 62 Clark
I btrcet, under Sherman House ; 75 Canal, corner
, Madison Street; Klnzie Street Depot, corner Weil
I Klnrle and Canal Streets ; Wells Street Depot,
comer Wells and Einzle Streets.
For rates or information aot attainable frm
your home ticket agents, apply to
Mbtim nenmrr. W. 17. STBrorrr,
Cfca'l Maag'r. Calcaso. Gta'I Ius. Ag't, Cnloscc
It ETA I L DEALER IN
,! OI.IVI: .ITRIIETK,
NEBRASKA.
Retail Dealer in
J'Al'f.K ALH A 1 a hbl'i l- n;un. t
RECORD OF ALL.
and Bankers in tteNorttwest m them. ;
Specialty. Prices am
cau be .tlade.
I ow a.
COLUMBUS, NEBRASKA
J. M. HONAHAN,
Uizz!i?.vk tzi dull: Is
Boots Shoes.
First-Class M aad M UaiemL I
ISTFulI selection of eastern work al
ways on hands. Repairing neatly and
promptly done.
Store opp. the Post-Offlcc. on 13th St.
uj it
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