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The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, March 31, 1880, Image 1

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Space. lto Ivo lmo 3m Cm lyr
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K ' I 8.00 13 1 15 1 20 1 35 1 69
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THE JOURNAL.
-.
IS ISSUKD EVERY TDSMDiY,
M. K. TDENER & CO.,
Proprietors and Pafeliiksn.
Business and professional cards tea
lines or less space, per annum, ten dol
lars. Lezal advertisements at statuto
rate. "Editorial local notices" fifteen
cents a line each insertion. "Local
notices " five cents a line each inser
tion. Advertisments clasified as 'Spe
cial notices" 11 vq cents a line flrstf inser
tion, three cents a line each subsequent
insertion.
A
f2TO ce, on lltb street., up stairs in
Joubnal building.
Tkrus Per year, $2. Sir months, $1.
Three months. 50c Single copies, 6c.
"
VOL. X.--NO. 48.
COLUMBUS, NEBRASKA, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31, 1880.
WHOLE NO. 516.
tpL
MlttttiM
E
V
V
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f
CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION.
A. S. Paddock, II. S. Senator, Beatrice.
Alvin Saundkrs.O. S. Senator, Omaha.
T. J. Majors, Kep., Peru.
E. K. Valentink, Rep., West Point.
STATE DIRECTORY:
Alkucos NaSCE, Uovernor, Lincoln.
3. J. Alerau Jer, Secretary or State.
F. VT. Liedtke, Auditor, Lincoln.
G. M. Bartlett, Treasurer, Lincoln.
C. J: Dilworth, Attorney-General.
S. It. Thompsou. Supt. Public Instriic.
H. C. Davs sou. Warden of Penitentiary.
).VVAl'.bef, Prison Inspectors.
C. n. Gould, f
Dr. J. G. Davla, Prison Physician.
H. P. .Matuewion, Supt. lmane Asylum.
JUDICIARY:
S. Harwell, ChieT Justice,
OeorSe B. Lake,) Aglj0Ciate Judge..
AmataCobb. f
FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT.
O. W. Post, Judire, York.
M. B. Keehe, DUtrict Attorney, TVahoo.
LAND OFFICERS:
M. B. Hoxie, Register, Grand Island.
Win. Anyan, Receiver, Grand Island.
COUNTY DIRECTORY:
J. G. Hisgins, County Judirr.
John Stauffer. County Clerk.
J. W. Early. Treasurer.
Henj. Sniclman, Sheriff.
R. L. Rosssiter, Surveyor.
John Walker, J
Jolin Wise. V CountyC
M. Maher,
'otnmiMtiloiieri.
Dr. A. Helntz. Coroner.
S. L. Barren, Supt. of Schools.
SyronUt, JucticesofthePeace.
Charles Wake, Constable.
" CITY DIRECTORY:
C. A. Spelce, Mayor.
John Wermutn, Clerk.
.Charles Wake, Marshal.
C. A. Newman, Treasurer.
S. S. McAllister, Police Judge.
J. G. Routkon, Engineer.
couvcilvex:
lit Ward J. E. North,
G. A. Schroeder.
,. . 2J JKard Michael Morriitey.
R. H. Henry.
' W Ward-K. J. Baker,
L. Garrard.
Celnnatms Pest Oflice.
('pen on Sundays trra 11 a.m. to 12m.
and from -1:30 to 6 p. M. Business
hours except Sunday 6 a. m. to 6 p. M.
Eastern mxilb close at 11 a. m.
Western mails close at 4:15 p.m.
Mail leave Columbus' Tor Madison and
Norfolk, daily, except Sunday, at 10
A. M. Arrive! at 4:3$ p. M.
For Monroe, Genoa. Waterville and Al
bion, daily except Sunday C a. m. Ar
rive, same, 6 P.M.
For Osceola and York,Tuesdayt,Tbur
days and Saturdays, 1 a. m. Arrive
Mondays, Weducdaya and Fridays,
ttP. M.
For Weir, Farral and Battle Creek,
' Mondars, Wednesdays aud r rids"ys,
6 a. m. " Arrives Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Saturdays, at 0 p. m.
For Shell Creek, Creston and Stantou,
on Mondays and Fvidays at 6 a.m.
Arrives Tuesdavs and Saturdays, at
6. M. , ,
For Alexis, Patrou and David City,
Tuesdavs, Thursdavs and Saturdays,
Ip.m "Arrives at 12. M.
For St. Anthonv, Prairie Hill and St.
" Bernard, Saturdays, 7 a. M. Arrives
Fridays, 3 p.m.
U. I. Time TaMe.
Eastward Bound.
Emigrant, No. G, leaves at ... C:25a. m.
Patseng'r, 4, ' ... ll:0Ga.m.
Freight, ' S, " "... 2:15p.m.
Freight, "10, " .... 4:30a.m.
Westward Bound.
Freight, No. 5, leave at ... 3:00 p.m.
Passensj'r, " 3, " .. 4:27p.m.
Freight, ' , ' ".... C:00p.ia.
Emigrant, "7. " " .. 130 a. to.
Everv dav except Saturday the three
lines leading to Chicago connect with
U P. trains at Omaha. On Saturdays
there will be but one train a day, as
bown by the following schedule:
O., N. A B. II. ROAD.
Bound north. I Bound south.
Jackson . 4:55 p.M.'Norfolk...6:30 A.M.
LostCrcek5:30 " jMunon...C:57 "
PL Centre5:57 " Madison.. .7:45 "
Humphrcr6;31 !IIumphrey8:34
Madison "7:40 PI. Centre 9:28 '
Munson 8:23 " LostCreek 9:55
Norfolk . 8:55 ' IJackson .10:30 '
The departure from Jackson will be
governed by the arrival there of the
U. P. express train.
BUSLtfESS CAXDS
TOH.t jr. at aiigh Ar,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE AND
NOTABY PUBLIC,
Plattk Chntbk,
Nkb.
TT J. HUOSO.,
JNOTAIIY PUBLIC,
1Mb. Stmt, t doors writ or Haamea HoaM,
Columbus, Nrb. 49i-y
Ir.E. I- SIGGIS,
Physician and Surgeon.
l3F"Offlce open
at all Lours.
Bank BiiHinj,
W
'M. BURGESS,
Dealer in SEAL ESTATE,
CONVBTAITCBR, COLLECTOR,
JLSS XKC72AVCX ASirr,
GENOA, JCANCK CO ... NKB.
PICTURES! PICTURES!
NOW IS THE TIME to secure a life
like picture of yourself and chil
dren at the New-Art Rooms, east llth
street, south side railroad track, Colum
bus, Nebraska.
4T8-tr Mrs. S. A. Jossxlyx.
' NOTICE!
IP YOU have anv real estate for sale,
If you wish to'buy either in or out
of the cltv, if you wish to trade city
property for lands, or lands for city
property, pive us a call.
WArJSWOKTK & JOSSELTK.
KKUJOX MU.LCTT. BYROX "XIIXKTT,
Justice of the Peace and
Notary Public.
N. MILLETT 4c SOX,
ATTORNEYS AT LATT, Columbus,
Nebraska. N. B. They will give
clote attention to all business entrusted
to them. 249.
STAGE KOUTE.
JOHN HUBEE, the msil-carrier be
tween Columbus and Albion, will
leave Columbus everyday except Sun
day at 6 o'clock, sharp, passing through
Monroe, Genoa, Waterville, and to Al
qloa. The hack will call at either ol
the Hotels for passengers if orders are
left at the post-otlee. Rates reason.
afclt, 93 19 Albion. 3sbUj
SCHOOL, BLANK AND" OTHER
pr
Paper, Pens,
Sewm MMmims
Musical Instruments and Music,-.
TOYS, NOTIONS, BASEBALLS AND BATS;''
ARCHERY AND CROQUET, &c, at
LUBKER & CRAMER'S,
Corner 13th and Olive Sts.,
V-y"W. 51. rOKNELIUii,
ATTORXEY-A T-LA W,
Up-stairs in Gluck Building, llth street.
D
K. Itf. I. XII URSTOJI,
BESIDENT DENTIST.
Office over corner of llth and Xorth-Rt.
All operations first-class and warranted.
0
IIIICAttO BARBER SHOP:
HENRY WOODS, Pkop'k.
t2TEverything in first-class style.
Also keep the best of cigars. 516-y
Tl f"cAL.LISTER BROS., ..
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Office up-stairs in McAllister's build
Ing. llth St.
VELLEY & SLATTERY,
Houso Movlnij
and house building done to order, and
In a workman-like manner. Please give
us a call. ESTShopon corner of Olive
St. and Pacific Avenue. 485 tf
GEORGE K. DEBET,
CARRIAGE,
House & Sign Painting,
ounrixa, qlaiiw,
Puper lIuBBisig:,
KALSOMINING, Etc.
J2TA11 work warranted. Shop on
Olive street, one door south of Elliott's
new Pump -house. aprlOy
T S. MURDOCK & SON,
Carpenters and Contractors.
Have had an extended experience, aud
will crimrHTitPn satisfaction ill Work.
All kinds of repairing done on short
notice. Our motto is.Good work and
fair prices. Call and give us an oppor
tunity to estimate for you. jSTShop at
the Big Windmill, Colui&bus, Nebr.
483-y ' "
P0S. SALE 0E TXADE !
MARES, f 0(3i.TS,
Tqaias of
Horsesor,.Oxeri,
SAID.E-PO(KEI8.wiId or broke,
at the Corralof
GERltARD A ZEIGLKU.
Columbus Meat Market!
WEBER KNOXEL, Prep's.
KEEP ON HAND all kinds of fresh
meats and smoked pork'and beef;
also fresh fish. Make satisajje a spec
ials. taTRemember the place. Elev
enth St., one door west of D. Ryan's
hotel. 417-tf
L0CT0& B0&ESTXEL,
U. 8- EXAMIXl.'VG SLRGEO.
COLUMBD8, t NEBRASKA.
OFFICE HOURS, 10 to 12 a. m., 2 to
i p. m., and 7 to 9 p. m. Oflice on
Nebraska Avenue, thr,e loors north of
E. J. Baker's" grain oflice Residence,
corner Wyoming and Walnut streets,
north Columbus, Nebr. 433-tf
F. SCHECK,
Manufacturer and Dealer In
CIGARS AUD TOBACCO.
All. KINDS OF
SMOKING ARTICLES.
Store on Olive St.,peartle old Post-office
Columbus Nebraska. 447-ly
A. J. ARNOLD Is Agent for the sale of
THE DIEBOLD
Fire Ef War-pof S&f
Not a safe lost in the two great Chi
cago lires. Call on or address
A. J. ARNOLD,
o06-y Columbus, Nebr.
LAW, REAL ESTATE
AXD' GENERAL
COLLECTION OFFICE
BY
W. S. GEEE.
"fONEY TO LOAN In small lots on
1.VL farm property, time one to three
vears. Farms'wilh somV improvements
bought and sold. Office for the present
at the Clother House, Columbus, Neb.
473-x
COLUMBUS
Restaurant and Saloon!
E. D. SHEEHAN, Preprieter.
"Wholesale nnd Retail Dealer in For
elgn Wines, Liquors and Cigars, Dub
lin Stout, Scotch and .English Ales.
ETlfairudty Whiskies a Specialty.
OTssTBRS in their season, by the case
can or dish.
lltk itroot, South of Depot
BOOKS!
Pencils, Inks,
COLUMBUS, NEB.
ADVERTISEMENTS.
COLulBOS Bffl- YARD
(One mile west of Columbus.)
THOMAS FLYNN & SON,iropr's.
GOOD, HARD-BURNT BRICK
Always on Hand. In
QUANTITIES lo suit PURCHASERS
371-tf
Wm. SOHILZ,
Manufacturer and Dealer In
BOOTS AND SHOES!
A eomalfU auortmpat cf Ladlrs' and Chil
dren's Shots kspt oh haad.
AU Work Warranted!!
Ostr Mette Good stock, excellent
work and fair prices.
Especial Attention paid to Repairing
Cor. lire Had 19tli Ht. '
COLUMBUS BRU6' STORE.
A.W. DOLAND,
(SUCCKSSOU TO DOLAND A SMITH,)
DBJSS, PATEIT ME1ICIIES,
Wall Paper, Toilet Articles,
PAINTS AND OILS,
ETC., KTC, ETC.
Best Of Goods And Low Prices.
:o:
MR. SMITH will still bc.fonnd at the
old stand, and will m.-tke prescrip
tions a specialty, as heretofore.
401-x
k
Daniel Faucette,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
Harness, Saddles, Bridles, and Collars,
keeps constantly, on band all kinds of
whips, Saddlery Hardware, Curry
combs, Brushes, Bridle Bits, Spurs,
Cards. Harness made to order. Re
pairing done on short notice.
NEBRASKA AVUNUE, Columbus.
63.4.
Dr. A. HEINTZ,
DEALER XX
HISS. HEDICIIES. CHEMICALS
WCVES, I.IQUOHS,
Fine Soaps, Brushes,
PEEPUMEEY, Etc., Etc.,
And all articles usually. kept on band bf
Druggists.
Physicians Prescriptions Carefully
Compounded.
Osse deer East of Galley's en
ElcTCBtth Street,
COLUMBUS, : NEBRASKA
BECKER & WELCH,
PROPRIETORS OF
SHELL CREEK MILLS.
MANUFACTURERS 9c WHOLE
SALE DEALERS, IN
FLOUR AND MEAL.
OFFICE, COL UMB US, NEB.
A?i ArVUEi, 13T A GARRET.
With both elbows on the table, aud
running both hands nervously up
and down through his hair, there sat
Mr. John Claverhouse.
Suddenly there was a gentle tap at
hie office-door; bat Mr. John Cla
verhou.se did, not hear it. How
could he? He was buried in him
self, trying to solve a problem, while
he twitched hia hair, as if to straigh
ten out the thoughts that thronged
his brain. .
'H'e'tf in there. I know heia,' said
a little, funny-looking' old woman.
'And I'm going to make hinxanswer
this knock.' With this 8he applied
her knuckles vigorously to the door,
and in an instant came the response :
'Oh I oh I Whoever yon 'are, do
come in ; and don't stand there, bat
tering my-door down I"
Aunt Prilly (for it was no other
than ihe woman kuown all over
town as Aunt Prilly) walked in. Mr.
Claverhouse asked her to be seated
and even pushed a chair toward her;
but Aunt Prilly, who had the keen
est pair of-little brown eyes in her
head tl at ever a woman had, perceived-
at once that Mr. Johu Cla
verhouse. was not. in his best mood,
which was very unfortunate, she
thought, for she bad come on a beg
ging errand ; 'and a begging errand,'
slip said to herself, 'stands no chance
at all when a -man isn't in his best
mood.' Down she dropped into the
offered chair--a little, weird old
woman; so very small that people
sometimes said there couldn't be a
smaller woman. But she had s
heart large enough for two such
women,' and in all kinds of weather
she was out on some errand for
the poor.
'This is what I call an easy chair,
Mr. John,' 6he said, as she leaned
back, with a smile. But she search
ed his face in vain for a responsive
look. 'A beautiful day, Mr. John,'
she added. 'The sun has been shin
ing the whole blessed time. Hasn't
gone under a cloud for a minute.'
'Sim 1 Sun been shining?' answer
ed Mr. John Claverhouse, making an
eflbrt to be pleasant, whilo he conld
not conceal that he was very much
out of humor. 'Who knew that the
sun had been shining? A poor fel
low like me can't see the sun in such
days as these. Banks breaking!
Stock companies going up so high
you can't see 'em I All kinds of in
vestments coming to nothing! I tell
you -what it is, Aunt Prilly, if things
go on much longer as they have
lately, the door of the almshouse
will open some day, and Mr. John
Claverhouse will walk in.'
Thank you, Mr. John, for letting
me know that ray time for getting
hold of some of that money of yours
is short,' replied Aunt Prilly, shak
ing her funny little head and twink
ling her funny little brown eyes.
'I'm glad I happened in this after
uoon, to catch it while it's flying. I
want all I can get of it for my poor
people in Water Street. How much
would you like to give me, Mr.
John ?'
My good woman !' exclaimed Mr.
John, in a short, twitching voice,
'don't ask me for any thing now.
Never did 6ee such times. The bot
tom is falling out of every thing.
You don't know bow much money
I've lost lately. Why, if there isu't
a turn in my affairs pretty soon, I'm
a ruined man. I'm sorry, Aunt
Prilly; but I bavn't a cent for you
to-day. Not a cent.'
'Ah! now, Mr. John,' said Auut
Prilly, lowering her voice to a very
tender tone, 'I want you to lay up
treasure in Heaven, and you can't do
it if you turn back on the Lord's
poor. Mhey are his poor, Mr. John
His. poor; aud I wan't you to help
them along in this world, se that
when the Lord of the poor comes in
the clouds of Heaven He will say to
yon : 'My'belove'd Johu, inasmuch
as you did it unto one of the least of
these my brethren, you did it unto
me.' 'And it will be a happy day
for yon, Mr. John, when the Lord
blesses you for blessing his poor.
You used to be a generous little fel
low,' continued Aunt Prilly. 'I re
member exactly how you looked,
running round the streets, giving
away everything you had to any
poor body that needed it. But when
you grew up you made money. Ah !
Mr. John, you made money; and
money didn't always open the heart
wide, Jhe Lord knows.'
Mr. John Claverhouse was a
money-grinder, and the world said
truly when it said that he was 'a
bard-fisted man.' But the tender
voice of a tender woman was always
a little distnrjbing to him, aud Aunt
Prilly's voice was specially tender
that bright sunny spring afternoon.
'What a bother these women are,
sometimes,' he thought to himself.
'They do so Btir up a man.'
- But, determined to shake off Aunt
Prilly,' he said. 'You pet and cod
dle them, and teach them to live on
charity," when they ought to do more
to help themselves. You know, as
well as I do, that they are a misera
ble crew. Water Street is the worst
street in town. You can't find any
worthy poor there; but you spend
on them all the money you can get.'
'If you woft'l give me any money,'
answered Aunt Prilly, quietly, 'will
you do something else for me, Mr.
John?'
'Yes, yes ; anything to. please you.
Anything but money. What is it?
v. 'Will you go out to-night in the
moonlight (you have no wife and
children to keep you at home,) and
go through Water Sjreet, and up
two flights of stairs, where the poor
est of the poor live, and'
'Yes, yes, I will,' iuterrupted Mr.
John. 'I like to air my brain at
night, after working it all- day over
my money troubles. And I'll tako
a run up the two flights of stairs.
And I'll do something more for you,
Aunt Prilly,' added John Claver
house, now actually emiling and
trying to make himself agreeable.
'If I find a saint, oue genuine saint,
such as you talk about, up those two
flights of stairs, I'll pull your boll
before I go to sleep and empty my
wallet into your lap. Assure as my
name Is John Claverhouse, I will.'
'Give me your hand on that,' ex
claimed .Aunt Prilly, rising from her
chair and stepping up to Mr. Johu.
Mr. Claverhouse extended his
hand, but with a knowing smile, as
he said :
'You needn't talk to mo about
your worthy poor in Water Street.
Not a saint will I find there.'
'Well, good-bye for to-day, Mr.
John. I'll leave it with you to de
cide whether there's a saint in Water
Street or uot.'
Aunt Prilly was gone; and Mr.
John Claverhouse was left alone, to
meditate on the uncertainty of riches
and to deplore the fact that they take
wings and fly away. Hi3 riches had
not yet flown away, but their wings
seemed spread, just ready for flight,
and Mr. John Claverhouse was a
very anxious man.
But evening found him hurrying
along in the direction of Water
Street, and as he turned into the
street the dim lights shone out here
and there into the gutters, and all
the air seemed foul, not only with
bad odors, but with oaths and curses.
'There's nothing that looks as if
there were a saint anywhere around
here,' thought Mr. Claverhouse;
'but I'll keep my word and take a
run up two flights of stairs. There's
no knowing, though, what I'll get
into. Bad place, this! bad place!
What I what I Music in here, as
sure as I'm alive.'
As he said this John Claverhouse
was standing by the first door, at the
top of the second flight of stairs,
with bis hand bent ready to knock.
But he did not knock, ne stopped
aud held his breath to listen to the
music inside.
There is no name so sweet ou earth,
Jso name so aweet as Jesus.
'A saint up here, I'm afraid ! A
saint at the top of this shaky,
wretched staircase!' said John Cla
verhouse to himself. Again there
came to his ears :
There is no name so sweet on earth,
No name so sweet as Jesus.
'I must go in! I must go in I' he
said, nervously.
He tapped; and, hearing a faint
soft answer, 'Come,' he walked in.
A faco bearing the marks of se
vere suffering, and yet serene, look
ed smilingly up at him from a poor
old bedstead as poor and old as the
rest of the scanty furniture.
'How do you do, ma'am ?' he asked
rather abruptly, for he was not used
to visiting the poor.
'More comfortable thau usual, sir.
Thank you, kind stranger, for com
ing in to see me. I am alone nearly
all the time. Poverty, you know,
attracts few friends. Please take a
chair near the fire. A very poor
fire it is for so raw and chilly au
evening, bnt it is a fire'
For the first time in his life John
Claverhouse felt embarrassed in the
presence of poverty.
'Why, Bhe'8 a lady; and I'm afraid
she's a saint!' he said to himself, as
he drew a chair to her bedside and
sat down.
'Do tell me, ma'am, how you came
here?' he paid.
'Well, sir, I suppose I must say
that poverty brought me here,' re
plied the woman ; 'but as I am a
King's child, I dislike very much to
talk about poverty.'
What! What! You a King's
child, and yet living in Water Street
up two flights of stairs and with such
miserable people around you?'
Yes, sir,' answered the invalid,
with a smile. 'I am a King's child.
The Kiug of Heaven is my Father,
and, you know, 'He givcth His
angels charge concerning us;' and,
with angels ever around me, I am
always in pleasant company. I
know I am what the world calls very
poor, but, really, I can not make
myself feel that I am very poor, for
very day my Father, the King, says
to me 'All things are yours,' and I
tell Him every day that He sees just
how it is with me. And oh! sir, I
get such sweet answers. He says
that ne will never leave nor forsake
me, and He tells me to 'conaidor the
lilies how they grow.' He takos all
the care of me, sir, and I don't bor
row any trouble. Even in this
world He is going to 'do more
abundantly than I cat) ask or think,'
and up yonder there's a mansion
waiting for me. I often look out of
my window and up into the sky, on
a beautiful night like this, and Bay
to myself: 'It's up there! It's up
there!'
'How can you knit stockings,
ma'am, with those poor Augers of
yours, so bent with the rheuma
tism ?' asked Mr. Claverhouse, as ho
noticed a little stocking on needles
lying by her pillow.
'Oh ! I'm knitting a pair of stock
ings for a sick child on the next floor
a crying baby, whose little feet are
always bare. I saved the money
from two dollars that wero given
me and bought a little yarn. I ought
to do something for the poor, you
know, when so much is done for me.'
John Claverhouse moved restless
ly in his chair and left suddenly,
after promising to call again.
Not many minutes later Auut
Prilly's bell was pulled violently.
'It's John Claverhouse,' she 6aid to
herself; and just then he carao in,
with bis wallet in his hand.
'Take it! take it!' he said, as he
opened the wallet and dropped fifty
dollars into Aunt Prilly's lap.
'I found a saint,' he added, 'and if
sho lives a week longer at the head
of that rickety staircase my name
isn't Johu Claverhouse.'
One day, before the week was
gone, the 'King's child,' as she lay on
her bed, considering the lilies, heard
footsteps on the rickety staircase
not the footsteps of angels, come to
take her to her 'mansion up yonder,'
but the footsteps of Aunt Prilly and
a strong man, sent by Mr. Claver
house, to take her to a new, bright
home he had prepared for her.
And as they laid her ou the bed
in her fresh little house, her eyes
were at once attracted to the walls;
and there in beautifully illuminated
letters set in a frame and hung up as
a picture, she read:
'I will never leave thee nor for
sake thee.'
On the other side of the room, in
as brightly-illuminated letters and In
a match frame, were the words :
'Consider the lilies.'
The next day Aunt Prilly met Mr.
Claverhouse, and, laying her hands
on his head, as if she would bless
him in the name of the Lord, sho
said, in her teuderest tones:
'Ah ! John Claverhouse, you found
your 'saint,' and now listen to the
words of the Master : 'Iuasmuch as
ye have done it unto one of the least
of these My brethren, ye have done
it unto Me.'
To Yean Farmer.
When commencing your agricul.
tural life, remember that industry,
economy and integrity will insure
success, and form the best capital
that can be employed.
Plow deep. The wealth of tho
soil is not all within six inches of
the surface.
Cultivate thoroughly if you wish
to reap abundautly.
Shear your sheep at the season
when you 6hcd your coat for the
season. Then be careful that some
smart ''traveling agent" does not
pull the wool over your eyes and
6hear you.
Wheu, by reason of inclement
weather, you cannot cultivate the
soil, it will be wisdom on your part
to cultivate the mind. A valuable
harvest will reward all earnest and
faithful culture.
Never allow yourself to be in
veigled runniug into debt. When
you are tempted to do so, go into
your field aud plant an extra acre of
some edible crop.
Of course you will become the
owner and raiser of stock. No farm
is complete that ignores stock rais
ing. Get the best, which is always
the cheapest in the end. Give the
scrubs a wide berth.
Never purchase farm utensils be
cause they are cheap. Cheap tools
are au unmitigated nuisance. The
best workman in the world cannot
make a good job with them. It is
economy to get the best, regardless
of cost.
"What I desire that others should
not do for me, I equally desire not
to do to them."
"Think not of faults committed in
in tho past, when one has reformed
his conduct."
Hits a mighty deaf nigger dat
don't hear the dinner-horn.
What 1 HemeoBatky ?
PART II.
All this will be readily admitted
by any honest, conscientious Old
School doctor. "But," he will per
haps say, "what can we help It?
We do all that can be done, and this
is all that can be asked of us."
This is just vshat I deny most em
phatically. The Old School doctor
by no means does all that can be
done by medical skill. A new and
infinitely better way has been dis
covered and is rapidly spreading all
around him a grand reform in
Therapeutics and he ignores it all
from prejudice, or something worse.
Whenever you call a doctor to your
house, you do so with the under
standing that he has left no stone
unturned in search for medical
knowledge, and that he is doiug the
very besf. that can be done for the
patient. I tell you, you are very
much mistaken if the doctor you
have employed is of the Old School.
You don't care for Allopathy,
Homeopathy or anything of the
kind ; all you care is to have your
child cured in the quickest and best
raanuer. The Allopathic doctor,
however, is bound to treat you ac
cording to the "regular" old routine
method, if it does kill the patient,
whilst he might be saved by the
new treatment called Homeopathy.
I mean to prove this assertiou. I
can prove it to any sane man. There
is not an Old School or Eclectic
M. D. iu Columbus, that would not
be surprised and astonished at the
wonderful efficacy of a drug, when
administered according to the
Homeopathic principle. No M. D.
could faithfully test for one month
the Homeopathic method, without
laying on tho shelf for eyer the
whole Antediluvian method. Home
opathy is so perfectly and beauti
fully scientific, that it seems like the
light of a new day, compared with
the endless contradictions and con
fusions of the Old Practice. Ite
member that hundreds upon hun
dreds of the Old School and Eclectic
men have already become converts,
aud this process of conversion is
going on continually faster and fast
er. Five-sixths of the whole num
ber of Homeopaths practicing
throughout the world are converts
from the Old School. A Philadel
phia Homeopathic collego has a
department especially adapted for
the instruction of Old School doc
tors who want to become Homeo
pathsa sort of medical mourner's
bench, where doctors can confess
(and repent of) their allopathic sins
aud it is well patronized.
The fundamental principle of
Homeopathy may be 9tated thus:
Those symptoms which a drug pro
duces in large doses (if given to a
person in health), it will remove in
very small doses, in the sick.
Thus Quinine in large doses will
produce, and in very small doses
will cure Intermittent fever, (of a
certaiu type). Ipecacuanhn in large
doses will produce, aud in very
small will cure spasmodic Asthma
and vomiting (of a certain type).
Tartar emetic in large doses will
produce, and in small dosea will
cure Inflammation of the lungs (of a
certain kind). Belladonna will pro
duce, and in small doses will cure a
certain type of Headache and Sore
Throat. Aud so on with all the
drug9.
Probably we can acconnt for this
law of cure by the following cir
cumstance: Every drug has a double
effect, a primary and a secondary
one just the opposite of tho other,
like the opposite poles of a maguet
positive and negative. The positive
is represented by large doses, the
negative by infinitely small ones.
There is action aud then reaction,
the one just the opposite of the other.
Thus opium produces at first stupor
and Bleep, and then follows a reac
tion, which is nervousness and sleep
lessness of much louger duration.
A "physic" produces movement of
the bowels as its primary action,
and then follows a reactiou consti
pation. (This, by the way, accounts
for the constipation in persons using
"liver pills;" it is the eilect sec
ondary of the pills ; and thus they
keep up a continual swinging of tho
pendulum medicinal diarrhea on
one side, and constipation on the
other, at 50 cts. per week. This may
be healthy enough for the drug Bhop,
but its healthfuluess for the good
brother is doubtful).
Tho Homeopath, then, gives his
medicine for the reactionary effect.
By reducing the dose more and
more, the primary effect is reduced
and the secondary alone remains
hence the adnptedness of the medi
cine to the disease.
But whatever the correct explana
ation of this Law of Similars may
be, its truth is established bejond
all doubt. It is just as much a fixed
law as the law of gravitation. Old
Rctinnl rlnrtnro ilptiv fliia rt rnnrc
bnt what is their denial worth, as
long as they havo not tested it?
Whilst each and eyery one who has
tested it fairly has been surprised,
delighted, convinced, convicted and
converted. To auy antediluvian
doctor who denied it we simply say :
"Test It, and then speak! But as
you have not tested it, but have only
beeu reasoning or thinking about It,
please have the modesty to keep
still, as you know absolutely noth
ing in regard to it !"
(To be continued.)
Correction. In the last article a sen-
tence (about in the middle) should read: f
"Tbia is precisely the lame point in tho
Old School practice" instead of same
point.
The Geatletaaa' Wlaau
If you speak the right word at the
right time; if you are careful to l
leave people with a good impression ;
if you do not trespass upon the
rights of others; if you can always
think of others as well as yourself;
if you do not put yourself unduly
forward; if you do not forget the
courtesies which belong to your po
sition, you are quite sure to accom
plish much in life, which others
with equal abilities fail to do. This
is where the race is not to the swift
nor the battle to the stroug. It is
whero you make peoplo feel that
you are unselfish and honorable and
truthful and sincere. Thi is. what
society is looking for in men, and It
is astonishing how much men are
able to win for self respect and suc
cess and usefulness, who possess!
these qualities of good breeding. It
is almost the turning-point of suc
cess in practical life. People will
not, in the long run, have about
them persons who make themselves
offensive, and they yield position
aud influence quickly and graceful
ly to persons who make themselevs
useful in a genial way. This is tho
point where friends are at ouce
most forgiving and most exacting.
They will overlook great neglects
if they can be assured of the' loving
heart 'beyond the outward sight;
but the moment you do rude things
in a rude spirit, and show the per
sonal coldness or selfishness, the
friendship is severed. This is why
the best friends make tho bitterest
enemies. It may be set down as
a rule that one can never afford to
not be a gentleman. It is best to
learn this rule early and practice it
late. It is not well to say mean
things of another, because in mopt
cases you ivill have to take it all
back in bitterness of heart, when he
does you an unexpected favor. It
is not wise to treat any or brusque
ly, because you can not always
judge a bird by tho feathers he has
on. It is not well to look down on
anybody, because the time may
come wheu he will look down upon
you. There is a certain selfhood in
every one which should be respec
ted. We have no right to infringe
upon it. It is not morality, it is
not mere conventional rule, it i3
not simply a social regulation ; it is
something in the nature of things
that you should always show a del
icate regard for others. One who
did nnt fail here was never known
utterly to fail elsewhere. Boston
Herald.
Commissioners' Proceedings.
March 16, 18SO.
Pursuant to adjournment, the
board of County Commissioners met
on Tuesday, March 16, 1880, at 9
o'clock a. m.
Knll' called: Present John Walk
er, chairman of the board, John
Wise, Michael Maher and John
Staufler, clerk.
On motion, the board adjourned
until to-morrow morning atU o'clock
a. in.
Attest: John Stauffer,
County Clerk.
Wednesday, March 17, 18S0.
Pursuant to adjournment of yes
terday, the board of County Com
missioners met on Wednesday,
March 17, 18S0, at 9 o'clock a. m.
Roll culled: Present John Walk
er, chairman of the board, John
Wise und Michael Maher, and John
Staufler, clerk.
The following resolution was
adopted:
Jiesolvcd, That the County Com
missioners purchase the entire inter
est in all the lands In Platte county,
Nebraska, taxed to the Burlington
and Missouri Kiver railroad company
for the amount of taxes, interest and
charges upon said lands for the year
or years for which said lands are
subject to sale for taxes delinquent
und unpaid, and which remain un
sold for want of bidders,
On motion, William Diet rick was
instructed to furnish one sack of
Hour to pauper family.
Petition of Wendel Echelhecker
to sell liquor in the town of Humph
rey was laid over according to law.
Petition of W. J. Belknap and
others to appoint G. W. Rollins road
supervisor for Crestou precinct, was
read, and said Rollins duly appoint
ed, and the clerk instructed to issue
certificate f appointment.
Bond of W. T. S'ebly, appointed
justice of peace for Granville pre
cinct, was approved, and the clerk
instructed to spread the same on the
The following road was located,
being petitioned for, by consent:
HOFFMAN ROAD.
Commencing at the Boone county
line at H. W. corner of sec. 7, T. 18,
R. 4, west, running thence due east
on section line, and terminating at
114 stake on north line of sec. 11
same town.
Attest: John Stauffer,
County Clerk.
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