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The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, July 03, 1901, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95073194/1901-07-03/ed-1/seq-4/

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Pi
ot amity. , ,.
- .-Now, toys." -said - tbe Suatoy
rchool teacher, "surely some of you
ciri tell roe who carried off the gates
ot Gaza. Spak up. William." "I
never touched 'em!" said the indig
nant Willianf. 'with a susplciom 4 of ,
tears in his nsefal voice. "Idon't see.
why folks always1 think when things
get carried off that I've bad some
thing to do with it"
l" 2ZS.j .-.. c-
P(tKMi't'ta(k(n'nrblMM
The NewYorkllbbard Jat .education.
hasvput an-end to favorltisminpub-1
licKBchools. Well-toao pupus were
injthe habit of making presents to
teachers, while poor children could
notafford to do so. Under the new.
system no one is permitted to give;
teacher anything, except at teacher'
hone, and, even then thej gifts must
be" anonymous.
-
The Preaar DUUaetlaa.
When asked the other day as to the
question he raised concerning the
syntactical number of the United
States, ex-Secretary Johm.W.,-Foster
said: "I think, after- all,?Uiebest;
answer is that of the cartoonist: 'Be
tween ourselves the United States are
plural, but between ourselves and any
other nation the United States is sin
gular.' "-
Kasalt of ' rrlaterM Error. -A
printer's error has resulted in a
queer state of things in Homer, Mich.
At-the recent election Samuel Wooley
and W. J: Webster,- both" democrats,
ran for school inspector and mem
ber of the board of review, respective
ly. The winter transposed the names
but not the ofices. Both gentlemen
were elected, .though neither got the
place" he sought
Urapevine Planted la a Trea.
Some time ago George Febry, Col
lege of St James, Washington coun
ty, Jld., bored a hole through an elm
tree and inserted a growing Concorn
grapevine, which, when it had grown
so It filled the hole, was cut off at one
end. The vine continued to grow, be
ing fed with sap from the elm tree,
and bore luscious grapes.
AabroM McKay caw.
Rockbridge, Mo., June 24th: The
neighborhood and particularly the
members of Rockbridge Lodge, No.
435, A. F. & A. M., are feeling very
much pleased over the recovery of Mr.
Ambrose McKay, a prominent citizen
and an honored member of the Mason
ic Fraternity.
Mr. McKay had been suffering for
years with Diabetes and Rheumatism,
which recently threatened to end his
days. His limbs were so filled with
pain Jhat he could not sleep. He was
very bad?
Just then, someone suggested a new
lemedy Dodds Kidney Pills which
has been much advertised recently, as
a cure for Bright's Disease, Diabetes.
Dropsy, Rheumatism and Kidney
Trouble.
After Mr. McKay had used a few
doses he commenced to improve. His
pain all left him, and he is almost as
well as ever. He says Dodd's Kidney
Pills are worth much more than they
cost' They are certainly getting a great
reputation in Missouri, and many very
startling cures are being reported.
I'lcknllli In tlie Fleaa.
Alfred Davies, an English member
of parliament, now on a visit to this
country, constantly reminds people or
Dickens' immortal Pickwith. He is
short and stout. 53 years old, with a
round face and a most benignant
smile. Put him in tights and gaiters
and he would be Pickwith to the life.
ask your grocer for DEFIANCE
STARCH, the only 16 oz. package for
10 cents. All other 10-cent starch con
tains only 12 oz. Satisfaction guaran
teed or money refunded.
All men who love humanity have the
soul of a poet; for poetry is the soul
01" love.
a iTS PwTnacnty Cured. Vaetaorurrrcmsnmmna
Krvt dajr'n ue "f !?- Kline's (ircat Scire Restorer.
Srtul fur FREK 9S.OO trial bottle and treatita.
1. U. U. Kijxc IK1-.S31 Arch St. lmllaJelvai-wra,
All men are not robbers. The ma
jority are satisfied with being robbed.
Hn. Vlnilowi sooth In r Syrup.
Torchndrea teettlatr, oftenothe Runst, reduce, lu
aamwmioa. allayi pala.cure wind colic Xicabotua-
An old maid is a woman who has
seen the flower of youth gone to seed.
It 1 tha Cblldrea DrlakT
Don't give them tea or coffee. Have yoa
tried the new food drink called GKA1N-OI
It U delicious and nourishing, and takes the
place of coffee. The more Qrain-O you give
the children the more health yon distribute
through tbeir systems. Grain-O is made of
pure grains, and when properly prepared
tastes like the choice grades of coffee, but
costs about 3 at stuck. All grooara sell It,
UcaadSftc.
You can't act all the time as if
life were a perpetual cake walk.
Hall Catarrh Care
Is a constitutional cure. Price, 75a
The woman who has pretty feet is
not apt to wear ugly shoes.
Piso's Cure Is the best medicine we ever used
tor all affections of the throat and lunps. WE
O. EMDSutr, Yanbureu, Ind., Feb. 10, 1900.
life is worth living so long as there
is somebody worth loving.
Lory; Live the King! The King is
Wizard Oil; pain his enemies, whom
he conquers.
A singer must have a pretty good
compass before he ventures on high
C's.
FRAGRANT
D0NT
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At anstoras, arty Mail for the price.
HALL RUCKEU New York.
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Toor
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us hl uae, and for your
trouble, wa win Craa
Sand Ton a Trial ll Hi
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laWNay)
Br.afj
the Peres
MB-war,
,x.
IN 3 OR 4 YEARS
If you take aa tout
home in Western Caa
ada,tae land of plenty.
Illustrated pajapalete,
riving- experiences ot
fanners who have be
eoBae wealthy in rrow-
iae wheat, reparts ot
I delegates, etcaad full
teferaMtioaas to reaneed railway rates can be
10 tac awenaiowcu wt
Oepertaient of Iaterior. Ottawa,
or tow V.
8M New York
UfeBUc
Hen.
MftrtlMaKatS
Heatiaa This Tafer.
W.N. U. OMAHA N. 36 lfl
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WEST VIRGINIA FLOODS
7
s ,AiC
500 Li-Ves May He Lost
"A doudburst In the Pocahontas coal
elds is West Virginia destroyed hun
dreds" pf-lives "and 'millions of dollars
of-property -Sunday.-1 The wall of
water swept through a 'narrow moun
tain valley already flooded by th'.ity
three'Tfcours Pof 7 continuous, -heavy
rains.' 'Two ridges of the Allegheny
Mountains hemmed it inland helped it
'to gather force. It swept a dozen busy
towns. It destroyed many miles of
railroad tracks and telegraph lines. 'It
tore from the hillsides the outer build
ing of hundreds of coal mines, and it
carried locomotives and trains of cars
dowa the valleyt -- The- cataclysm
crushed and "drowned the inhabitants
by-hundreds as they struggled to es
cape up the mountain sides. The loss
of life is estimated at 400. The loss to
railroad and mining property is at
least S2,000,000 and .the 'loss to other
property. probably '- as j much more.
These figures -nre, however, merely
approximations, for communication
with many jaf the villages ia yet Im
possible. rearfal Lois Is Possible.
The, flood may prove to have been a
more disastrous one to life than the
Johnstown horror, and the list of the
dead may mount into thousands, or it
may be that there was sufficient warn
ing to permit the escape of the great
majority of the people. Reports from
many places indicate, however, that
hundreds of bodies arc floating down
with the flood. The difficulty of get-
MAP OF DISTRICT FLOODED.
ting relief to the district for perhaps
a week or ten days until the railway
lines are replaced means that there
will probably be great suffering among
people who were fortunate enough to
save their lives, as all their stores
were swept away. Fifteen hundred
DEATH OF SECRETARY HAY'S SON
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ADELBERT
' Adelbert S. Hay, who was killed at
Yale college last week, was the eldest
son of the secretary of state and was
born while the latter was living in
Cleveland, O., about twenty-five years
ago. His second name is Stone, which
he bears in memory of the late Amasa
Stone, his maternal grand sire. He was
educated in private schools of Cleve
land and prepared at St. Paul's Acad
emy in Concord, N. H., for Yale. At
the university he was a popular schol
ar, for, though outwardly reserved in
manner, he was capable of warm and
steadfast friendships, and was of
charming manners. At Yale Adelbert
gave much time to athletics, and thus
splendidly developed his naturally
robust frame, so that he stood at 21
full six feet high, with chest and limbs
of corresponding proportions. The
stalwart figure of young Hay, with the
look of reserve power in his face, un
doubtedly went far towards securing
for him the respect and consideration
which is not always exhibited to one
of his years.
With the physique went a degree of
TRAIN CAUGHT
A passenger train was caught in the
flood near Vivian, W. Va., acd the
lives of the passengers were saved by
the use of ropes thrown over from the
coke ovens which lined the Vivian
yards. The passengers caught the
ropes and willing'hands dragged them
from the flooded train and over the
oven barricades.
The pathetic story of a Hungarian
family at Keystone, is told. The fath
er was at work in the mines and when
the alarm was given, did not reach the
CARS AND ANIMALS
At least 300 sine mules and 1,000
horses were drowned in the flood.
Nutnbers could be seen swimming
about in .the flood and making an un
equal fight for life.
But little damage is done to the
mines proper, as the drift mouths were
high up the mountain sides. Several,
however, are reported flooded, but it is
Impossible to ascertain the extent of
the damage.
On the North Fork branch of the
Norfolk & Western, whi2h is five and
INSANITY MENACES
Those on the high grounds along
the path of the flood have workei
ceaselessly to recover the deserting
minds of the afflicted. Homes have
been thrown wide open, food dispens
ed, clothing shared, and all that could
be done to lessen the sorrows of the
less fortunate ones was done quickly
and without thought of co'or or na
tionality. Omly one of the ten collieries located
m tke North Fork branch escaped
fo4i-ag. this being the Ashland, locat
men are alreaoy at work trying to re
store the trackn.
Elahora. Valley Devastate
The scene of the worst part of the
flood was the Valley of the Elkhorn,
in McDowell county, in the south
western part of West Virginia. An
other valley to the south of this one
I aSS-.'xjC:WgSSS5SZBlB
BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF SCENE
along the Clinch river also suffered,
but not so severely. Elkhorn creek
flows between two mountain ridges,
Indian Ridge to the north and Big
Stone Ridge to the south. In some
places the valley is not over a quar
ter of a mile wide, the hills rising pre
cipitously from the banks of the
stream, along which ran the track of
the Norfolk and Western railroad.
Over the high valley when the atmos
phere was heated to a high degree the
'w",'ids brought clouds saturated with
moisture. The fall of rain that result
ed was tremendous. The swollen
mountain streams all poured tbeJT
water Into the Elkhorn and the nar
row valley was filled by it.
Oreadral Uelnge of Waters,
Then came the cloudburst. Its wall
of water started down the valley short
ly before 9 o'clock In the morning, and
the damage had all been done by 11.
There was nothing In its path that
could resist it Houses were whirled
away like sticks, railway embank
ments melted like snow in the sun
light. There was just a few minutes
S. HAY.
personal bravery that, though never
recklessly or boastingly evidenced, was
still manifested on more than one oc
casion. An extended public career was
scarcely possible for one of hi3 years,
yet in the short time that elapsed be
tween his graduation from Yale and
his death he had achieved a reputation
worthy of emulation. Upon his return
from the Philippines trip he was ap
pointed United States consul at Pre
toria, the capital of the Transvaal re
public. Secretary of State Hay collapsed at
New Haven, Conn., under the strain
of fatigue and mental agony Sunday
evening as he stood by the remains of
his son Adelbert, whose dead body
was found on the sidewalk in front of
the New Haven Hotel at 2:30 a. m.
The secretary was at once assisted to
his bed and a physician summoned.
An hour later his daughter. Miss Helen
Hay, arrived, and, although herself
nearly prostrated .by the news of her
brother's sudden death, assumed the
care of her father.
IN THE FLOOD.
drift mouth until the town was partly
inundated. He made his way to the
cabin that served as his home, where
his wife and new-born babe were lying
helpless. He tried to rescue both, and
after a fierce battle with the flood,
which was filled with logs and debris,
he reached a place of safety only to
discover that both were dead.
From Enns, W. Va, to Vivian, a
distance of ten mile3, the country was
lined with debris of all kinds.
At Elkhorn the lower floors of all the
ARE SWEPT AWAY.
one-half miles long, there was no loss
of life as far as known, but hundreds
were rendered homeless and are to
night camping in the mountains.
The Pocahantas Coke Company lost
$30,000 worth of coke on cats and ia
coke yards.
At least 100 freight cars on sidings
collapsed and rolled into the flood and
are destroyed. Freight trains in tran
sit were overtaken by the flood and
some cars were washed f.om the
tracks.
MANY SURVIVORS.
ed at the head of the stream.
The McDowell coal company lost
twelve residences. The Roanoke com
pany lost its boiler house and 100 horse
power boilers were swept four miles
down the stream.
The Louisville Company's store
house is a wreck and the stock of
goods a total loss.
English is spoken by 130,000.000 peo
ple in the United States and the Brit
ish Empire.
given the people to save themselves om
the hills, and then all was over for
those who had failed. The region of
the worst destruction stretches from
Welch, the county seat, on the west
to Coaldal on the east, a distance of
about twenty miles. Of the towns be
tween, Keystone, a place of 2,000 in
habitants, is reported to have suffered
the most.
Two Haadred Are Daad at jaeyateae.
The death list there is reported to
mount up toward 200. Sixty-six dead
bodies have been recovered. There
were thirty-five saloons in that town,
and of them only one is left standing,
it being located high on the hillside.
The rumor is that it is the only build
ing in the town still standing. Vivian,
OF WEST VIRGINIA FLOODS.
the next largest town, is reported to
have been almost wiped out of exist
ence. In both of these towns the min
ers had assembled with their Satur
day night's pay. They cannot have
got back to their mountain huts, and
must have shared the fate of the in
habitants. After the flood the railroad
company started men on foot to walk
along the hillsides to survey the con
dition of the line. A trainmaster, who
ralked the twelve miles between
Vivian and North Fork, counted thirty-eight
dead bodies floating on the
surface. That is an indication of what
may be expected when full Information
is obtained.
Flee from Water.
The remarkably heavy rains of the
past few weeks have caused the flood
ing of a number of mines In the Car
bondalo section of the anthracite coal
belt in Pennsylvania and operations
have been suspended at four collieries,
throwing about 7,000 men and boys out
of employment.
At the Glenwood mine the water has
reached the height of 38 feet, and is
still rising despite the fact that extra
pumps have been put in says a special
telegram from Scranton. At several
of the mines the pump3 generally used
are under water and others will have
to be put In place.
The damage at all the mines will
reach tremendous figures.
Some Historic Disasters.
1880 Barry, Stone, Webster and
Christian counties, Missouri; 100 kill
ed, 600 injured, 200 buildings destroy
ed; loss $1,000,000.
1880 Noxubee county, Mississippi;
22 killed, 72 injured, 55 buildings de
stroyed; loss, $100,000.
1880 Fannin county, Texas; 40
killed, 83 injured, 40 buildings destroy
ed. 1882 Henry and Saline counties,
Missouri; 8 killed, 53 injured, 247
buildings destroyed: loss, $300,000.
1883 Kemper, Copiah, Simpson,
Newton and Lauderdale counties,
Mississippi; 51 killed, 200 Injured. 100
buildings destroyed; loss, $300,000.
1884 North and South Carolina,
Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, Vir
ginia, Kentucky and Illinois; 800 kill
ed. 2,500 injured. 10.000 buildings de
stroyed. These storms constituted an
unparalleled series of tornadoes.
1890 Louisville, Ky.; 76 killed, 200
Injured, 900 buildings destroyed;
lo3s, $2,150,000. Storm cut a path 1.0C0
feet wide through the city.
1893 Savannah, Ga., and Charleston,
S. C, and southern coast; 1,000 killed
and great destruction of property.
1893 Gulf coast of Louisiana; 2,000
killed; great destruction of property.
1896 St. Louis cyclone; 500 killed,
1,000 Injured; great property loss.
1900 Galveston, Texas, flooded by
tidal wave from gulf; 6,000 lives lost,
thousands more Injured; property loss,
over $40,000,000.
A Maalla Mint Discussed.
A prominent government official in
discussing the proposition for the es
tablishment of a mint at Manila said
recently:
"I have heard nothing about the
matter since the adjournment of Con
gress, but I know that it is receiving
the attention of the war department,
which is obtaining all the information
possible on the subject. Army officers
seem to favor the establishment of a
mint at Manila and an effort to sub
stitute American coinage for the Mexi
can now in general use. There is con
siderable opposition, however, as It Is
certain that to attempt to push the
American dollar and redeem it in gold
would precipitate commercial disturb
ances that might result In disaster.
Secretary Gage Is opposed, and I am
inclined to think that this plan will
not be adopted."
WWAAMMA'
houses were overflowed and the fami
lies took refuge in the second stories,
from which they were rescued.
In the mad rush to escape the fami
lies were separated and the children
lost, and this added to the general ex
citement, making it Impossible to ac
curately estimate the loss of life.
The scene along the Elkhorn Valley
beggars description, and the full dam
age and loss of life cannot be correct
ly ascertained for several days. Relief
movements have started and telegrams
are being received from other cities
offering assistance.
MMMAMM
Wbea to Leave MlaUtry.
The Rev. Edward Everett Hale of
Boston remarked recently: "When I
was a young man studying for the
ministry I came to the conclusion that
it was a good time to retire from the
pastorate of a church when one got
to be 40. When I got to be 40 I
changed my mind and thought 50 was
the proper age for retiring; then, later,
I came to see things still differently,
and decided that when I was 60 I
should drop the work; but I don't give
the matter any thought now."
Seasltlae Army Oatears.
German army officers have grown
sensitive. The Berlin Guards regi
ment have tabooed the weekly Die
Woche on account of a tale by Ernst
Wichert in which some of the officers'
misdeeds are related.
School CfcUdraa of Ceba.
A year ago there were 3,025 pub
lic schools in Cuba, with 125,000 chil
dren. N there are 150,000 school
children and new schools are being
built
Abscesses.
It Is not uncommon when young
lambs or other young animals die and
are opened to find abscesses In the liv
er and these may be associated with
similar abscesses in the joints or else
where. The earliest experience of the
writer with such abscesses was in the
lambs of a flock of in-and-lnbred Bor
der Leicester ewes, raised upon the
low lying, rich, alluvial soil In the
Till valley of Northumberland, Eng
land. The Iambs referred to probably
showed all the Ills that such weaken
ed animals are heir to, and many were
the discussions as to the nature and
cause of the various lesions discovered
upon post mortem examination. The
white-nosed lambs were invariably the
seat of all manner of unsoundness,
and on general principles we were
strongly tempted to knock them on the
bead at birth, so seldom did they sur
vive more than a few days. In most
of these and in some of the remaining
lambs, that were apparently healthy
for a day or two we found, on opening
them after death, that the liver was
a mass of pus, which in some had
burst, and in others remained enclosed
in a cyst In the liver of one lamb
there was a large abscess, and some
smaller ones. The large one was ad
herent to the diaphragm and had an
opening into the right side of the chest
where extensive inflammation and ad
hesion of the pleura had taken place
caused by the fluid portion of the ab
scess being discharged Into the pleural
cavity. In others the entire liver was
disorganiezd and the parts presented
the appearance of a mass of corrup
tion. For a long time we were at a
loss to explain these abscesses, and
shepherds consulted attributed them to
tuberculosis and thought that they
were inherited from the ewes and ex
isted at time of birth. Later on how
ever, we came to the conclusion, and
have no reason to think otherwise
since, that the abscesses are due to
suppurative microbes-stryptococci
which gained access to the
system at the raw navel cord.
The open umbilical vein pre
sents a highway, so to speak, for
the carrying of germs to the liver and
in all the cases thoroughly examined,
the navel cord was found to be inflam
ed and discharging a thin pus. In some
instances the navel cord had shriveled
up and fallen off, but an angry spot
remained and this offered a suitable
place for the lodgment and propaga
tion of the noxious germs. When the
germ gains entrance an abscess usu
ally forms around the navel; pus Is
generated and Is carried into the cir
culation In due course of time to form
fresh colonies in the liver or in the
Joints and we then have a typical
case of "joint ill" which is not gener
ally recognized as such, but is apt to
be considered rheumatism or tuber
cular swelling. The raw navel of ev
ery young animal Including the hu
man infant should be most carefully
attended to. It Is not merely neces
sary to cut and tie it to stop profuse
bleeding.
It should be remembered that the
system is wide open at this point, and
futher that Iho cord Itself Is bound to
decompose and the products of de
composition absorbed Into the system
are liable to produce blood poisoning
or pus infection. Thousands of young
animals yes Infants too succumb
annually to such poisoning, due en
tirely to ignorance of the subject,
hence we would most strongly advo
cate the Invariable application of
strong antiseptic solutions to the na
vel cord at time of birth and until it
is entirely healed up. Any good disin
fectant will do the work necessary.
For infants and lambs nothing is bet
ter than a mixture of one part of iodo
form with six parts of boracic acid to
be applied to the navel upon antiseptic
cotton retained In place by means of a
bandage and to be renewed once dally.
A strong solution of carbolic acid or
similar disinfectant, one drachm in
eight ounces of water, applied two or
three times daljy will also prove ef
fective as a preventive, but the most
effective of all is a strong solution 6f
corrosive sublimate in water. In addi
tion to the application of medicine the
lambing pen, and similar places for
other animals should be kept scrupu
lously clean.
Observations oa Southern Horticulture.
The question of transportation of
fruit Is the great one at present In
northern Alabama and In some parts
of southern Tennessee the strawberries
were rotting on the vines this spring
at a time when, they were selling for
15 cents per box in Chicago. They
had been picked to supply the local
demand till the prices fell to a point
where 'picking was no longer profit
able. The price was low because the
growers were virtually cut off from a
market Within a few hours from that
time, the. writer was in Atlanta, where
berries were selling from wagons at
from 7 to 12 cents per box. The
growers around Atlanta simply had
access to a good market
e e a
There are certain fruits better suit
ed to the sandy lands than others and
these only should be grown. We men
tion the peach and plum, the cherry
and the grape, and the Kleffer pear.
At Southern Pines only two varieties
of grapes are being grown the Del
aware and the Niagara. These two
varieties are best suited to the soil
and conditions mentioned. Of the two,
the Delaware probably stands at the
head. This is due to the fact that it is
less affected by grape diseases than
the other, and also to the fact that It
sells at a higher price In the market
The Delaware should be extensively
grown in the South, for It Is hard to
overstock the markets with this vari
ety. The Niagara is profitable where
the marketing conditions are favor
able. Many of the other varieties of
grapes require a stronger soil than
the varieties we have mentioned.
Lire Stock News.
It is said that lambing in southern
Arizona will average 100 per cent this
year as against sixty-five per cent last
season, and this is the best percentage
in two years. The winter was extra
mild and sheep came out in fine condi
tion. The ranges were never in better
condition, and the grass is of excellent
growth thus far this season.
Sheep-killing dogs are so numerous
in many sections of the south as to
discourage farmers from attempting to
keep flocks, for which they have am
ple range. A bulletin by the govern
ment recently published emphasizes
the value of Angora goats as a protec
tion for flocks of sheep from the rav
ages of dogs.
An outbreak of cattle poisoning
which occurred in the Gallatin Basin,
Montana, and which resulted in the
death of forty cattle, was investigated.
It was found that the poisoning was
due to the species of larkspur known as
Delphinium glaucum. and that this
plant had been apparently eaten In un
usual quantities, on account of the fact
that other green forage was covered
by a recent fall of snow.
Some things go without saying, but
the. bore usually says without soing-
AMUlioaalre Laborer.
The eccentricities of a yound mil
lionaire follower of the teachings of
Count Tolstoi are vastly puzzling the
good people of the village of Wood
bridge, N. J. With practically un
limited means at his command, Geo.
Ruddy, a, son of one of the richest
men In the state of New Jersey and
a college graduate who has enjoyed
the advantages of foreign travel, pre
fers the life of the humblest toiler.
Clad in blue jeans aud-cowhide boots
he literally wrests his livelihood from
the unwilling soil of a tiny farm, the
smallest and most worthless corner of
his father's estate. According to his
philosophical creed poverty is the
only incentive to intellectual effort
A Mother of Olaats.
Mrs. K. O. Rauf, who died in
North Dakota recently, was the moth
er of four sons, who ranged In
stature from six feet to six feet six
inches and in weight from 200 to
nearly 600 pounds. The aggregate
weight of the four boys was about
1,400 pounds. Carl K. Rauf, who died
a few years ago, attained a weight of
nearly 600 pounds, while his brother
Ole is well content to hold himself
down to 350 pounds. Lars is able to
tip the beam in the neighborhood of
250, and Chris is the feather weight
of this remarkable quartet, being
slightly lighter than Lars.
Tallest la the Moraine;.
The human body, it has been found,
is shorter at night than in the morn
ing, due to the weight of the body
compressing the intervertebral car
tilages. During sleep, or while in a
recumbent position, the pressure be
ing removed, their natural elacticity
enables them to resume their normal
size, consequently the height of an in
dividual will vary from three-eighths
to half an inch between morning and
night.
Would Like to Jail the Directors.
Judge Danforth, of the Maine su
preme court, had this to say in con
nection with the case of a defaulting
bank cashier recently sent to prison:
"I wish that the law permitted me to
send with the accused every one of the
bank directors who, through a long
term of years, expected you to do your
work, live respectively, bring 119 a
large family and be honest all on a
salary of $600 a year."
Ask your grocer for DEFIANCE
STARCH, the only 16 oz. package for
10 cents. AH other 10-cent starch con
tains only 12 oz. Satisfaction guaran
teed or money refunded.
The crab may not be as good eating
as the lobster, but he'll do in a pinch.
In addition to receiving the highest
form of award at the three great
Paris Expositlous, the Remington
Typewriter has received the highest
award for merit from the largest users
who are the best judges as to the
comparative value of typewriting ma
chines. Omaha office, 1619 FarnamSt.
The shorter the ice crop is in win
ter the longer the bill in summer.
YELLOWSTONE PARK.
Extended tour, leisurely Itinerary
with long stops in the Park. Private
coaches for exclusive use on the drive.
Pullman sleeping and dining cars.
Established limit to number going.
Escort of the American Tourist Asso
ciation, Reau Campbell. General Man
ager, 1423 Marquette Building, Chica
go. Colorado and Alaska tours also.
Tickets iaclofc ail Exscaea Everywhere.
Train leaves Chicago via Chicago,
Milwaukee & St Paul R'y, Tuesday,
July 9, 10.00 p. m.
The author's train of thought is
a construction train.
Ask your grocer for DEFIANCE
STARCH, the only 16 oz. package for
10 cents. All other 10-cent s tarch con
tains only 12 oz. Satisfaction guaran
teed or money refunded.
As there are no perfect men, so
there are no perfect manners.
Try Sraln-O! Try Grala-Ot
Ask your Grocer to-day to show yon m
package of GRAIN-O. the new food drink
that takes the place of coffee. The children
may drink it without injury as well as the
adult AU who try it, like it. GRAIN-Obas
that rich seal brawn of Mocha or Java, but
it is made from pure grains, and the most
delicate stomach receives it without dis
tress. H the price of coffes. 13c and 25 eta,
p package. Sold by all grocers.
Laws should be simple and short;
one walks impeded in to long a robe.
If beauty is the first gift Nature
gives to woman, it is also the first
she takes away.
WINTER
but act as a tonic on the whole 30 feet of bowel wall, strengthen the
muscles and restore healthy, natural action buy them and try them.
You will find in an entirely natural way your bowels will be promptly
and permanently put in good order for the Spring and Summer work.
bb LIVER TONIC
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ALL DRUGGISTS. BBkAE
GUREi
all kawel
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a- haaeh,la4lMataa.aiaiple,
aaatattnuacaa. w jmmr wow a law raga
larlr 7 are CUut atelu CoaMaitfoii kill iam
aaawla ftfcaa all laaia sagatlMr. II to a
Starter far tfca cftraale allaiaata aa loac yeara f
aafM4r that caaa anaravaunaa. mm aaaiiai wawa
alia waa atari takta OUaaUETBto-li
will aeVer s wall aa aa wall all tfca
vamt aa yaaraawala rlcfct Vaka mrmi
fH
vasvi
Accept
aammammmmmav
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mmmmmmmmmma, saaElaVt r-2-rr?F TTJXi
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am F W BaaKfeSSS-S-'- "??
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n Baaaaa' Baw.. a JaaMSi9E?ravXr7
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No
Substitute.
A School for Policemen.
At the suggestion of a Chicago jus
tice of the peace a school is to be
opened in that city in which police
men will be taught elementary gram
mar, so that they can express them
selves more clearly on the witness
stand.
GREATLY REDUCED KATES
VIA.
OMAHA AND ST. LOUIS RAILROAD.
Buffalo, X. Y., on sale May 15th to Sept.
anii.
Kansas City. Mo., on sale June 7th to
11th.
Detroit. Mich., on sale July Ctli, Cth and
7th.
Cincinnati, O., on sale July -1th, 5th and
Cth.
Chicago, 111., on sale July 23rd, 21th and
25th.
Louisville. Ky., on sale Aug. 21th. 25th
and 26th.
Cleveland. O.. on sale Sept. Sth to 12th.
Half rates to most all points south first
and third Tuesday each month. Summer
tourist rates to all summer resorts now
on sale. For descriptive matter rejtardins
the Pan-American Kxposition. summer
tours, rates and all information call at
O. & St. L. City Otttce. 1415 Karnam Mreet
(Paxtcn Hotel building), or write Hsirry
E. Moores. C. P. He T. A., Omaha. Neb.,
or A. J. Bandy, G. P. A., Kansas City,
Mo.
All men are not honest. The ma
jority are satisfied with the pretense
of honesty.
For centuries the world has waited
in vain for a perfect man.
WANTED, SALESMEN.
StOCk in tho United States. LUieral Commissions paid. Cash advanced weekly, wrilo
today for particulars, giving references. Oregon NllfSery CO., Salem, Oregon
P
AN -AMERICAN
VISIT
THE
EXPOSITION BUFFALO j EXST
LAKC
I MIC M.y
(CHICAGO
LOW
RATES
FREQUENT
TRAINS
T0LD0
Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry.
Fall aartlcalara a aaalicatloa fa F. N. BYRON, General Western Agcaf, CHICAGO
Causes bilious head-ache, back-ache
and all kinds of body aches. Spring
is here and you want to get this bile
poison out of your system, easily,
naturally and gently. CASCARETS
are just what you want; they never
grip or gripe, but will work gently
while you sleep. Some people think
the more violent the griping the better
the cure. Be careful take care of
your bowels salts and pill poisons
leave them weak, and even less able to
keep up regular movements than be
fore. The only safe, gentle cleaner
for the bowels are sweet, fragrant
CASCARETS. They don't force
out the foecal matter' with violence,
mamaUcMayM
GUARANTEED IHf?
aaRar aaeaVdaa la taa warM. Tala laaaiilala araaraa
5aaiarM.aaaawBatteaUaaalaI. We kam aaMa aai
. Maateal fcawata. foal
wtn aaH CAMABm
aMaeyrcfaaaca. aaaaytadar.tara
fair, aaacas trial, aa
, MMraan
a-Jay, far yea
ka aa4 ta cant, aaa t
wfcaa yaa aarcaaaaa It.
aaxaa. Taka mmr alcf
aaa
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asr. ateaMa wUlaalektyl
. -- -A .s.
.aBaaaaPVaaaaa'KaMt aaaW aa
I HZaXUS KUE9Z Cfei XaW K
In a country where everybody
wishes to be somebody, nobody is
anybody.
Ask your grocer for DEFIANCE
STARCH, the only 16 oz. package for
10 cents. All other 10-cent staren con
tains only 12 oz. Satisfaction guaran
teed or money refunded.
In the midst of public perturliances,
the most sensitive barometer is
money.
NEW FAST THAI TO COLORADO
Via Sllisourl ractllc ItiilliTtiy.
The Missouri Pacific Railway Is now
operating double dally service from St.
Louis and Kansas City to points in
Colorado, Utah and the Pacific coast.
Trains leave St. Louis !) a. m., and
10:10 p. m., Kansas City 6 p. m. and 10
a. m., carrying through sleeping cars
between St. Louis and San Francisco
without change. Excursion tickets
now on sale. For further information
address Company's agents.
H. C. TOWNSEND.
G. P. & T. Agent. St. Louis, Mo. '
A poor woman is fat; a rich woman
is only stout.
SQZODOUT Tooth Powdar 25c
NATURAL-BORN SALESMEN. Hard
working and thoroughly reliable
men to soil tho bost-Krown nursery
BO"
CHAUTAUQUA
LAKE
NEVER
SOLD IN BULK.
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