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The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, November 11, 1903, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95073194/1903-11-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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Columbus Journal.
Columbua. Welr.
- Eatecsd at U PostoWoe, Colambss, .. as
aseoed-cUM mail matter.
iMMlVHMHtply .f.TftUll.
mm or aussusifHo:
OMfMT.W Mil.
fit moatfce !.
WEDHMDAT. NOVKMHKR II. IftW.
taTTa atabaorlbere af tk Joar-aal:-Plaase
look at te ate njspnv.
ntte year aatae on Uo wraapec of
mar Journal or oa tae asargia off
Tan Jonrnal. Up to Ufa ate, yoar
eeeecrlpUoa la paid or acoonatea
Lafal Hatiew.
Atnarim iii h tolerably free ooaatry
when yon think rialit down to the 'foun
dation of things, and act accordingly.
Tub JoonwAt has bud thirty years ex
perience in bundling legal notions of all
clesoriptions, and takes thin oocaaion to
nay tbat it in thoroughly equipped for
this sort of work.
We desire that yon remetnlier ns whan
yoa have work or this sort to lie done.
When yon do tlie pnyiog. yon have the
right to place the work. Special atten
tion given to mail order. 011 on or
address, M. K. Tithhbb k Co..
Jonrnal Oflloe, Oolnmbns, Nabr.
Kn- Jv. Nakctk f Chicago visited bis
daughter in Lincoln last week.
Tub first snow of tlie season etraok
Norfolk, Neb., in flurries Monday morn
ing. tmm
Tna presidont has designated Thars
dsy, Nov. 2Cth, as the national day for
offering thanks.
Thk election of (leorge!. McOlellan
to the mayoralty of New York city will
doabtless add his namo to the list of
possible democratic candidates for pres
idential honors next year.
Kmpkkok Wim.iam of (Jermany under
went an operation Knnday for the
removal of a polypus from his larynx.
The operation was successful, and not
considered in any way a serious trouble.
AitrrntNtitobeat Mark 1 lamia was the
democratic Imttle cry in Ohio during the
recent campaign, but the republicans
carried tlie election by unprecedented
majorities and Mark will still continue
to wear the smile that won't wear off.
Thb bishops of tlie Methodist church
are holding a meeting in Lincoln where
they have under consideration the work
of education of the colored race in the
south. They go to Omaha this week
where tliey will hold a general commit
tee meeting of the missionary depart
ment of the church.
Jitinir Hoi.mkh Thursday last sustain
ed tlie demurrer of tlie state to Porter's
aaswer in tlie suit Imraght to secure the
money, for the state. About the cheap
est way out of this trouble is for Mr.
Porter to put back that marks and brand
money where it rightfully belongs and
be done with that bad traaaaotion.
Hon ;not.icBA has made its appearance
in the southern part of the State. E. D.
Cramer, a prominent fanner who lives
not far from Ileatrico, has lost twenty
five bead within tlie past fear days, and
strange an it may seem report states that
the disease has not made its appearance
among any of the hogs owned by his
neighbor.
It is now evident that the strike of
tltocoal miners in the first district of the
Colorado Fuel and Iron company at
Trinidad, Colorado, is no small affair.
In fact it is a strikeout of all proportions
to that even hope! for by the officers of
the united mine workers of America, and
ten times what was looked for by the
coal operators.
Thk Union Pacific will make Cheyenne
a train dispatching station at once.
This is the first time in thirteen or four
teen years that the Union Pacific has
dispatched main line trains from Chey
enne, It is said that the changes made
daring the last few years and shortening
of the line has made the changes in dis
patchers possible.
Tna house of representative was call
ed to order at noon today, Taesday, by
Alexander McDowell, the clerk. Mr.
Cannon, who has been selected as the
uaanimoae choice of his party for
speaker, will be formally elected. After
the oath of office is administered to him
by the "father of the hones," a title be
stowed upon the member who has seen
the longest continuous service, the
aataker will administer the oath to the
BMmbera generally.
Tine Navy department has issued or
ders to the gunboat Newport at Savan
nah to coal and proceed at full speed to
8aa Domingo. The action follows the
advices of the serious condition of affairs
there, A telegram was received at the
Navy department Sunday saying that
the cruiser Baltimore arrived at Puerto
Plata, Santa Domingo, the same day, bat
making no reference' to the state of
affair at that port, which is ia poaaee
aion of the insnrrectioaiata and is. under
blockade by the government forces.
Thk seventeen mile of doable track
oa the main line of the Union Pacific
near Cheyenne have been in operation
the past few weeks, say the Denver
New. The Hall block system on that
division ia also being used. The sema
phores are 200 yards apart. When a
train enters upon n certain eectaoa of
track the weight of the engine operates
the semaphore 200 yard ia advance. It
is expected that this system will do away'
with the numerous aocideata which have
taken place in the vicinity of the Sher
man tunnel. The coat of the double
track just completed is estimated at
4,080,000.
Tna farmers' co-operative shipping
i, eomettBMs called the farm
grain trust, has began nnnctionin
the sapreme court of Nebraska un4er
the Ramsey elevator law and also uader
the common law, to compel the Bur
Ungten toad to grant an elevator site on
the rajht of way at Blnden, Webster
cenaty, aad a switch or spur to ran to
nn elevator already conatrncted of the
tight of way at the town at Upland,
FreukUn cannty. This is the first suit
Waaniht wader thpwwnaona of the new
net ef the lagiaklnra eemneUing rail-
famish equal fhcilitiea to
REEVER ELECTED.
This judicial diatriet baa Ion baaa
noted for ite daaaoaratio sMJorities, bat
this year the rnpaUieana aoaiinatad a
tnsn who made a rigoroaa eeneeijra
which, together with hit popalarity aa
an attoraey, elected bin by a majority
of 223 Totea over Griarison, denocratio
nominee. Hare are a few flgarea for
yoar ooaaidaratioa:
I
CD
ST.
f
Counties.
Oolfax....
Dodge
Merrick...
Naaoe
Platte....
ToUl...
84S
1710
1007
70S
1175
1243
1751
752
584
1688
21552210
92S
842
855
1715
961
878
1607
1028
loom
5S89I080CI
5863
USTJLT IV PLATT1 C0UITT.
metal Vesa at ana Eleetlea MaM Ha-
veeaeer . lHa.
The election is a thing of the past and
the active politicians will now settle
back into their nana! lines of work again
after a hard fought although quiet cam
paign. The presidential campaign com
ing next year, made politicians very
zealous in their effort to bring oat
strong sentiment aa to the probable
standing for the next campaign, but in
Platte couaty the vote was very light, aa
compared to 1900. The total vote this
year is 0,247, while in 1899 it was about
84237 and in 1900 it was 34)95. In 1901
the total vote was 3147 and 1902, 272.
Considering that there were several
nominees on the republican ticket in
Platte county who withdrew their names
from the ticket late in the campaign, and
others made very little effort toward
their election, the republicans have every
roason to feel encouraged as compared
with years in the past. There were many
republicans who did not go to the polls
at all, because they considered that there
was little or no hope of electing their
men. The Monroe Looking Glass saya
there were twenty republicans in that
place alone who did not vote, and we
have beard similar remarks from other
localities. If the republicans had worked
for their ticket as tbey should have done,
the majorities in the county woald have
been greatly diminished and it ia not
improbable that some of the candidates
would have been elected.
A comparison of figures is the best of
arguments, and we therefore give a few
in order that our readers may ase that
Platte county has not lost republican
votes but has gained them.
In 99 Hollenbeok reoeived 1,974 votes
in this county and this year 1,796.
Orimison in 99 had 1,777 and this year
1,512.
Considering that Sallivan has been a
resident of this county since he has
grown to manhood and that be ia an ex
ceedingly popular man, and that many
republicans voted for him, his vote was
not what was expected by his friends
and partisans. His msjority this year is
1,042. In 97 Sullivan had for an oppon
ent Judge Post, his own neighbor, and
that year reoeived a majority of 947 or
only 95 votes less than in this last elec
tion. The Third, his home ward, in 97
gave Sullivan a majority of 13 while this
year he had CC.
Sheriff Byrnes in V9 reoeived l,94fi
votes against Steinbaughe 1,291 and this
year Carrig had 1,079 while Sbarrar got
1,466.
Judge Uobison in W reoeived 2,112
votes against the republican candidate
Pngsley, who had 1,061. This year Hat
terman carried 1,928, or 194 less than
Itobison. Brock this year had 1,149.
Metr. in 99 reoeived 2,002 votes and
this year 464 leas or 1,538.
In 99 Leavy received 24260 votes and
this year 1,813. In TO Craig had 918
votes and this year Britell 1,192.
JUIMK OF THK SlTrSKMK COURT.
Barnes, r 924
Sullivan, d 1966
Sullivan's plurality 1042.
RBOKNTH OP THB 8TATK tTNIVKRSITT.
Allen, r 1209
Whitmore, r 1162
J ones, ti. . . . . ..... ....... Atiju
Weber, d 1588
JODOK OV SIXTH DISTRICT.
Reader, r 1507
8tineon,r. 1026
Hollenbeok, d 1715
riHiisou, q. . .... .... .... .... ...... jowl
RmPRBSBBTATITR TO FILL CNBXPIRRD
TBBM IN DISTRICT 24.
Meedel,r .4342
Bender, d 1683
Bender' plurality 341.
COUHTY TREASURER.
aJvOIKni U 4OW
CtiKRK OP TUB DISTRICT COURT.
Gruenther, d 2225
SHRRrFF.
ajwaen77ejr r AvOo
VuaaiTQff U JO 4 5
Carrig's plurality 221.
CMERK.
tlOwMUf Tm ltREf
Vaaaal ! loll
GraTa plurality 551.
JUD4HC
rooK, r. .... .... ........ .... .... .. 1 14.7
Ratterman, d... 1928
Ratterman'a plurality 779.
ASSKHSOR.
AUVvUVUe a AiVaPS
lwUaVe A 4 tJ
Galley'aplarality421.
aUPKRIXTBRDUT.
Britell, r. 1192
Leavy, d 1818
Leavy's plurality 621.
COnORRR.
M. vnf(Ue eT APV 9
elBBvW-mQ m AaaiJO
Met?.' plurality 491.
aunvRTon.
Rosaiter,d 2018
suPRRvnons.
DMjy a7 un
WKanaeja a W
StfTaaaVm) 4 4 m&
OnBU9Cf V a 9 A
XuVuWenwQe tj R0
JUSTtCR OP THR PRACR.
xvTefBe R7 aMtPv
j OneWBt Q Of K
OOKSTAM.UB,
EwOSsRInSire Q
MjaaaaVnT n !! aXXf
Ixun mterriew relative to the result
of the election with ex-Senetor W. V.
AUen of Madison, the Lincoln Jonrnal
published the following:
in no auction bat thnt the
a
will have their own
next year, nnd thetr
will not be those of the demeeretac or
wpnbtteaa parties. Locally, it is not
fangpahnbls that there will eeutiawe to
bntnaisa."
-Have yon noticed, sin at or, thnt in
jadieial districts where n Jtmoarat nnd
beneh the dentocrat was elected aad the
popaliet defeated 7" was asked.
"It has been noticed before this," re
plied Mr. Allan, "that a good many deav
oorate refuse to support popaliet eaadj.
dates running on a f uakm ticket ,
"Does the outcome of the' election in
Ohio, Nebraska, lows, and other states
foreshadow the result of the presidential
contest next yearr
"Not at all. The middle and western
(( bM nnthin to do with the de
ciding of the presidential election, their
innuenoe oeing ooaneea to odbtsim
tioue. With the south solidly demo
cratic and the north aad wast generally
republican, a few states like New York,
New Jersey. Connecticut and Msass
ehueette hold the balance of power.
Which ever way they go the nation goes.
The result of. the ejection in New York
city pointe to the nomination of Cleve
land for president by the democratic
party."
"If Cleveland i the nominee, will
Bryan, in your opinion, support him?"
"Mr. Bryan ia too sagacious, I thiak,
to indicate in advaaee what hie position
will be if Cleveland gets the nomination.
It is possible, but hardly probable, that
he will support Cleveland.
Mart of the old settlers of this part of
Nebraska remember Keate-kot-oos, who
was for many years a trader with the
Pawnee Indians and a frequent Colum
bus visitor, and the following bit of his
tory from the Schuyler Free Lance will
be read with interest by them:
"While speaking upon this Indian
subject a little matter of history con
nected with this state and particularly
with the Platte river comes to the mind.
A Mrs. Piatt, who atill lives In Oberliii,
Ohio, and who was one of the first white
persons to be in this section of the coun
try tells about it. In Mny, 1854, the
passage of the Kansas-Nebraska bill by
congress gave this country n little shap
ing and aisiag up. Mrs. Piatt had been
here then a doaeo years, being first
located just across the Missouri river
opposite where Nebraska City now in at
a settlement called Gaston, whioh was
her maiden name. Mrs. Piatt says:
When Mr. Piatt and I went to the
Pawnee mission station by request of the
missionaries of the American board who
were laboring there, to act as teachers
under government, and co-operate with
them in their work, we found no such
word ns Nebraska in the geographical
vocabulary of that section. We wero on
the Great American Desert, in that por
tion known ns the Indian territory, and
through it lazily rolled a broad, shallow
stream, named by the Frenoh traders,
La Platte, and called by the Pawnees,
Keata-kot-oos, (Flat Water). When our
Indian friends wished to give Mr. Piatt
a name, and were told by the whites tbat
bis name aooorded with that of the
Frenchman's river, they called him
Keats-kot oosand the name lives in that
region today. But south of the land
claimed by the Pawnees laid that occu
pied by the Otoes, and towards its east
ern boundary a stream went rolling and
gurgling over its rocky bed with suoh a
sad plaintive tone, it suggested to the
poetical mind of the Indian that the
waters were weeping, and they named
the stream Nebratbka (Weeping Water)
hence the name of our state, Nebraska.
That the sound of 'th is in the original
word, I was assured by the son of n mis
sionary who lived among the Otoes some
years and spoke their language fluently.
But the language of those petty prairie
tribes was not reduced to writing, and
we who labored among them and spoke
their tongue, could sympathize with
Joaquin Miller, who deplored that the
musical E-da-ho (accent on the second
syllable) of his boyhood's love, was
changed by the white man into the dis
cordant I-da-ho (accent on the first syl
lable), when we found thnt the soft
Pawnee (accent on first syllable) was so
spelled and aoeented as to be pronounced
Pawn-ee; whenthesweetrlowingO-ma-ha
was changed to the long drawn out
O-may-haw, and the charming Ut-tn-wa
coarsened into Ot-ta-way. How can the
mistakes be remedied?' "
1
ADDITIONAL
: : LOCAL : :
'a Clib.
.The general meeting of the Woman's
club was held at the bomeof Mrs. L.
Gerrard Saturday afternoon. Federation
notes were given in response to roll call
followed by interesting reports of the
state federation given by the president,
Mrs. Geer, and delegates Mesdames Ger
rard and Garlow. Vocal solos were ren
dered by Mrs. Reader and Miss Morgan.
Among other business which came
before the club for consideration, was
that of working for a public "rest room.
A committee composed of Mesdames
Musser, Gietxen nnd Geer were appoint
ed to wait upon the business men of the
city nnd find the possible cost of main
taining such a place for the benefit of
the public
The literary department will meet with
Mia. C. Johnson Saturday afternoon.
The musical department meet next Tues
day afternoon with Mrs. Farrand.
Hnaty f afilkt.
The marriage of James Haney and
Mias Alma 8egelke took place Wednes
day morning at 9 o'clock, in the St.
Bonaventnm church, Father Theobold
officiating, only relatives of the bride and
groom being present to witness the
ceremony.
The bride waa attended by her sister
Miss Clara 8egelke, and the groom's
best man was his brother Patrick Haney.
The bride was attired in a gray silk with
a net cloth over dress. The bridesmaid
wore a gray over piakailk. The.wedding
march was rendered by Sister Agnes ns
the wedding party entered the church.
After the ceremony a wedding dinner
was served by the bride' mother to the
relatives present, and in the evening they
ware eereuaded by eeveral different
orgaaizatioes, among them ware the
Bachelor girls dub, of which the bride
has been a popular member, and later ia
the eveein the Columbua City band
The bride ia the eldest daughter of
Mr. ana Mia. Charles Sagelke and ia one
at the BAoat respected young Indies of the
city. The groom is also popular among
the young people nnd they have the beat
of their heat of friends.
Prof. Funk, the piano teacher who has
itiy lecated aermaaeatly in Colam-
ta
having a factory
ha hi
tuning
fat indiTidaal
V
toh
will receive the
Address Bex 76.
4 n i n 1 1 in 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 in ri
I
Closing 0u Sale
at Gostr-aiM Below.
I
I have purchased the stock !
of goods of C. M. Beecroft !:
on 13th street, in the old::
Oehlrich building and in-!!
tend to give the people of
Columbus the benefit of ii
prices never before heard!!
of in this city and com-!!
munity. You are cordially ! !
i '
To call and examine the goods and find
for yourself that this is not a mere ad-!!
vertising scheme hut a bona fide sale of ;
these goods will be made.
' Tours for business.
-;M -
. i "
WiSBwmmGA
.;..;..X-XK"X-;-W-X-X-: ! Ull
W$&S&HQ44&W$
1
4 ESTABLISHED 187a - STOCKS, ETC., $15,000
COLUMBUS .
I Biimv aid Mmj louse.
X LOUIS LUTJHARM 8.
? HMoenor'to HKNRY LUBKKK.
! Wholesale Jobbers & Contractors.
DEAB FRIENDS:
Our goods are of the best quality to be found anywhere. Wa have
r bought them right in car load lota for oash. We sell them right
and you will save money if yon will come to Columbus, bring your naigh
& bora along, club together, and buy your goods right here. Freight paid at
X wholesale prions, ready for use. Free inspection for the best judges of the
, country. Uranus that nave been tested for years and round perfect.
lours very truly,
LOUIS LUTJEHARMS.
Z
$Q$r&&$&$$4&$
Mrs. Kftf Daai.
One of the most distressing accidents
of the kind which ever occurred in Co
lumbus befel Mrs. Grant Kage lasi
Friday about 11:80 o'clock, from which
she died at about 7 o'clock in the evening
the same day.
The accident occurred about ns fol
lows: Mrs. Kage was alone in the house
with her three young children, and in
brushing coals from the kitchen Btove
her apron caught fire. She was prevent
ed to some extent from extinguishing the
(lames on account of the children, who
rushed to her, nnd in her anxiety to keep
them from catching fire, the flames
spread on her clothing, burning thellesh
from the knees up in n moat frightful
manner. There waa only n small portion
of the body that was not burned almost
to a crisp. The flesh was entirely burned
from tho hands, nnd the hair from the
head.
One of the children ran to a neighbor
and informed her that her mother was
burning up, and by the time she reached
the bouse she found Mrs. Kage entirely
enveloped in flames.
Dr. Voce waa immediately called but
the burns were so severe that little help
could be given the sufferer, and she
psased away about 7 o'clock in the even
ing. She did not lose consciousness
until about 4 o'clock.
Mrs. Kage moved here with her hus
band from Seward two years ago, and
resided in the southeast part of town.
She leaves besides her husband, three
young children, nil daughters, aged
about one, three and "seven,, years. .One
brother, Clarence Heoox, ia a carpenter
in Una city. She was born August 8,
1877, in Harrison county, Ohio, and came
to Seward, Nebraska, with her parents
when five years old? She waa married
February 16, 1896, to U.O. Kage. '
Funeral services were held Saaday
afternoon in theUnited Brethren church,
Rev. Lohr officiating, after which the
remains were laid to rest in the Colum
bus cemetery. A very large number of
people attended the services.
Mrs. Heoox of Seward, mother of the
deceased, will take the children, home
with her. 2 ? j
Hifh Seaaa! Kates. " j ;
The Ninth grade arithmetic dees' av
eraged 89 4-19 per cent last asonth.
The Seniors are organising a basket
ball team, and other grades will proba
bly organize later.
The Junior claaa hat finished the sub
ject, The measurement of electficity,n
and has also completed the stady of
Silas Marner by George Eliot.
At a meeting of the Juniors Monday
night the former officera were re-elected,
Roy Stires president and Lottie Beeber
secretary of the grade. They also made
n selection of their class pin.
The Kearney Military Academy foot
ball team will play the Cohmbaa High
school team at Columbaa, Saturday,
Not. 14. Kearney has a strong team
and a good game caa be expected. Ev
erybody tarn oat.
It i probable that a foot ball game
will be played between Madiaoa nnd Co
lumbaa High achook ia this city on
Thaakagiviac day. Manager Richard
soa expects to hear from Madiaoa today
in regard to the matter.
CurnafTaWaks.
Wa hereby express oar sppratistina
aad thanks to the many frienas far the
thoaghtfalaUsntiea given in the
loss of hast aai
MnaL.
Mn. aso Maa.O.L.Y.Hiu
M.AXMne.J.
ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii ii ii it 1 1 1 i '
;:
.
;:
K.tM-ri-l"l"I-llllt"8"l"IH 1 M
W. A.' Way was in Omaha Monday.
Roy Johnson waa np from Omaha over
Sanday.
C. J. Garlow was a Lincoln visitor
Thursday.
Mrs. S. E. Baker waa in Duncan n few
days last week.
C. W. Peareall and Ed. North of Omaha
were Columbua visitors Sunday.
Mm. E. H. Fnnk of Spalding came
down Saturday to visit her daughters.
Mrs. A. J. Mason is visiting relatives
here. Mr. Mason ia now teaching achool
in Carroll, Neb.
Mrs. Joseph Lloyd went to Cedar
Rapid, Netk, Friday, called by the ill
ness of relatives.
Miss Carrie Younkin of Iowa, who has
been visiting her brother E. F. Younkin,
returned home Monday.
Miss Anna Stevenson of Beatrice vis
ited at the home of F. N. Stevenson a
few days, returning home Wednesday.
Mias Anna Calto and Mrs. Ledtx of
Chicago have been the guests of Mia.
M: O. Calto, returning home last Wed
nesday. Mrs. Frances ForrestoU of Denver and
Mrs. Carrie Schnlte of Dea Moines, are
visiting their brother. Judge Ratterman
nnd family.
W. K. Lay, an old-time Columbua cit
ixen, waa up from Omaha on business,
doming here Wednesday and returning
home Thursday.
Charles Sagelke, jr., came up from
Omaha Wednesday to attend the wad
ding of his sister Miss Alma Sagelke and
Mr. James Haney. f
R. W. Hobart aad little eon went to
Dal Rapid, South Dakota, Friday, where
Mr. Hobart waa called on business.
They will return today.
Mrs. C H. Sheldon has returned from
a two weeks' visit in IUinoia nnd Iowa.
Miss Bessie Sheldon who acoompanied
her, will remain a few weeks longer.
J. M. Taylor of Couacil Blnfa, for
merly a fanner living east of Colambas,
was in town Saturday on hia way home
from BeUwood where ha had visited
Mr. and Mm. J. 8. Harboldaheimer of
Guttonberg, Iowa, arrived Friday on a
two week' visit with relative. Mr.
Herboldaheimer ia a brother of Mrs. Ed.
Morrow.
Mr. and Mra. Eber 8mith nnd Mias
Hacel arrived hare Sunday from Trinn
dad, Colorado. Mrs. Smith will visit
-, Mrs. A. J. Smith for several
Mr. Smith went to Omaha Mon
day. Mr. Smith will be batter remem
bered hare by her acqaaiatancea aa Miss
Caha Madden. They expect to go to
Maxwell, Nabr, where they will live on
Plttta Center.
fYeta8iaaL
The aehoola opened again Monday
1 ana weak oa account
ofthedjphtberiascara.
ia November is
amajaaal hi this cHmsta, yet
hare thk
fc PERSONAL
MENTION
Naveaaber.
" The Oother Heaaa wfll ha opened for
the eatertsiamast of the pablic next
Monday. Mr. and Mm gather have had
sanii aad paintsd, and it has been
fitted with new furniture from top to
aVapaJwapaama AbOjOjO) sunFBM0j aVnaaHi anmVaSavapaaSO
EMWkowtoruauhotL
So. L
LoaisHeihelhas
the. frame of hia
baraap.
- Masons are doing; their work oa Rich-;
ard Adamy'a cellar.
; Joha Haibal has lumber ready to pat
ap a near building oa hia place.
W. T. Era' team took a lively spin
through the corn field Monday morning.
No aariona results.
The new wall improved hog barn
which Mr. Gerhard Loseawarected on
his place is now compleUd ' "'
Mia. Rud. Kbrte aad 'daughter Ma
thilda ratamed from Columbaa, where
they, had stayed a couple 'of days, last
weak Friday. -':
Rav. Frees, accompanied by Rev.
Miessler from Cotambus, drove up ,to
Leigh last week Taesdayto attend. n
ooafereace which waa in flnwion there
Tuesday and Wedaeaday. ;
WauUar leanrt.
Review of the weather near Genoa for
the month of October, 1903.
Mm tMscrtar of th anatb 53.08
Umb do mum aoeth laat jtmx MM'
Histiew t pwHiwc Vkh HV
LowMtdooatho Mtb 29
ysmaaa Usa MJt
WmtmW Qsajfnf f
aveABsUY IsaJJa 9
4Uaa QsnyV aW
alnKna mrlSlmw-"OOiySL 9
KaTa fall dmtimg portion ot-dmj. S
laeaw of niatall. .. .-6.
Do Mate momtk last year... S.1
Prevailiag wind from &E. to N.W.
Frost and alight ice at intervale
throughout the month.
- Car it Thamkj.
Wa wish to express our sincere thanka
to the neighbors aad frienda for their
kindness to us in the time of our trouble,
the death of our wife, mother, daughter
and sister.
TJ. G. Kaok asd Chiuwcn,
Mr. k Mrs. Heoox and Chtldkkn.
Law lata Watt via lajrliartoa
oiU.
$25.00 to Portland, Tncomn, Seattle.
$25.00 to San Francisco nnd Los An
geles. $220 to Spokane.
$20.00 to Salt Lake City, Butte and
Helena.
Proportionately low rates to hundreds
of other points, including Big Horn
Basin, Wyo., Montana, Idaho. Washing
ton, Oregon, British Columbin, Califor
nia, etc.
Every day nntil November 30.
Tourist cars daily to California. Per
sonally conducted excursions three times
a week.
Tourist care daily to Seattle. Inquire
of nearest Burlington Route agent. 8 b
CklMrea De Lie.
Do children lie? Yes; constantly,
persistently nnd universally, says the
Kindergarten Magazine. A child does
not tell the truth because he could not.
He does not know the truth, and hia
approximation to the truth Is very
much vaguer than ours. And there are
certain qualities of his mind which
make It Inevitable thnt he should per
vert the truth. In the first place, truth
la synonymous with knowledge. He
does not know what truth Is. In the
second place (and it Is the same with
ns), children gradually approximate
the truth They have their ideas of
truth. In the third place, the child's
imagination drives him often to tell
what la not true.
rata Werk aad Hair.
Everything physical being equal, it
la established that the man who la en
gaged in professional work will grow
gray sooner than will the man who
earns his bread by the literal sweat of
hia brow. Thus by Implication the man
who has more and harder brain work,
than another more worries, more
troubles, more difficult thoughts, less
vitality In proportion this Is the Indi
vidual nnd the profession that soonest
are marked by gray hairs.
Wamuu Craeltr to Waaaaa.
Another illustration of bow mean n
woman can be was given the other
night when a 'young lady was calling
on an elderly spinster who dresses and
nets with unbecoming youtbfulness.
The spinster showed her visitor n beau
tiful handmade lace collar and said
proudly. This Is over fifty years old."
It Is beautiful!" purred the 'girl.
-Did you make it. dear?" New York
Press.
Aavaaeca Aaeestml FrrMe.
So Woodby Is very rich now. When
I knew him he was poor. His only
treasure in those days waa the musket
his great-grandfather carried in the
Revolution."
Oh, his great-grandfather has been
promoted since. Woodby exhibits his
sword now." Philadelphia Press.
The day that the boy baby puta ea
his first pants his mother beglna to fed,
that there are two aaen In the hoaac '
Atchlaoa Globe.
COLUMBUS MARKETS.
Wheat, new CO
Corn, old shelled-? bushel 30
Oat- bushel 25
Bye Ul bushel 35
J5anag07a tXa
Hog V cwt. 4 30 4 40
Stock steers-V cwt 3 00 4 00
Fat cows-V cwt 2 25 3 00
Stock steers-? cwt 3 000 4 80
Potatoes-V bushel 070 -
Batter V m. 14020
Eggs V doaeo. 190
FKKD PRICES AT MILL.
Bran, bulk 60
Shorts, 70
Chop feed. balk. 70
Chop corn, 65
Marketa corrected every Taesday afternoon.
Bmral
AMERICA'S
BEST
anaTlnay F aaaiBBBa
ft famjjl sT OCBI
eawuai sjatmt aVinilii
aaaaWaaieejBJBSj SSJOj SBSSavmrSa
2ESH ONE iSLllS
aWtt-aaaawaaartlJt,
C. S. EASTON &
Will Give
HEATING
-fOR
50 Heaviest aid
Tho winner's corn will go to the St Louis
Exposition with grower's name. No re
striction as to color. All corn must be
reasonably dry and not tampered with
or loaded with any foreign substance.
Award will be made December 25, 1903.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Groceries and Hwdware.
99J
SHORTEST LINE
Oregon and Washington.
TWO THROUGH TRAINS DAILY
HtUMlaonieljT Kiuippeil With
Free Becliaing Chair Caw. Diaiac Caw. MJ a la carte.
Pallmaa FalareSlwpiBKCaw. llutf. ttarokimc and Library Caw.
TuBrwtSIwpiagCanaSpecialty. Pintwh Ucht-Htoan Hmt.etc.
DAYLK1HT K1DK OF
2U0 MltFJ ALONG THE HKAUTIFUL
COLUMUIA K1YKK.
Full infornmtion cheerfully furnished on
application to
Jf. II. HEXHAM, Agent.
TIME TABLE,
COLUMBUa NED.
Lincoln,
Omaha,
Chicago,
St. Joseph,
KaaaaaCtty,
Bt.Loaia and all
polnta Baat and
Bonth.
Denver,
Helena,
Batte,
Bait Ika City,
Portland,
San Francisco
nnd nil pointa
Weat.
TBAIXS DBPAKT.
No. 23 PaMeBffr, daily except Saaday. ?5 a. hi
No. S3 AeeounSodatioa, daily except
Batanlay 4J0p. m
TKAIXM ABB1TK.
No. 21 PaMeBer. daily except Saaday. 8:R0 p. m
No. SI AccoaiBitidatioa, daily except
Saaday 1J0 p.ra
TIME TABLE U.P.RR.
K.1ST BOCSD. H.U!t UXK.
12, Chicaico Special 10 a.
4. Atlaatic Expreae 420 a.
8. Colaatboa Local It- 6:10 a.
103, Fast Mail 1:00 p.
108. Colorado Expreae 3:10 p.
6, Eastern Express. 2:50 p.
3. Orerlaad Limited 57 p.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
WEST BOtJHD. TCAIJC 1XS.
5, Pacific Express 2:la.
11. Colo. Special 95 a.
101. Fast Mail 1140 a.
1. Orerlaad Limited. 12:05 p.
3, California Express J:00 p.
7. Colnatbai Local. 8:35 p.
,2S, Freifht.. ............ .......... 8J0a.
No
No
No
No
No
No.
No
SOBTOLS BBAXCB.
Depart
No. SS. Passeacer "JO p. m.
No. 71, Mixed 7:1 a. at.
ArrtT
No.M. Passeaser 12 JO p. m.
No. 72, Mixed 7:10p.at.
AUIOS ASD SPALDISO BBABCB.
Depart
No.M, Passenger 2:10 p. a.
No. 7S, Mixed ...SJOa. ia.
Arrive
No. 70, Passencer 1:00 p.m.
No. 74, Mixed s.-OOp. at.
Norfolk passeimir trains ran daily.
No trains oa Albion and Spalding branch
aaadays.
Colambas Local daily except Saaday.
W. II. Bkhbab. Aceat.
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1
iiDisrs mmssii
One door wast of
Halst & Adams.
Havin parchased the C. F. Hoe
hen stock of Drafts. Wall Paper.
Paints. Oils. etc at a meat redac
tion we are makincsomeTery low
prices. Call and see as.
T At 30 to 40 per cent, discount. T
2 lasw" sssjaa ns
J 6rM SaHb hi Tern :
All preacnptions carefully
compounded by an exper-
ienced registered pharmacist ',
I fmuVft Fhai-Meffej.
LOUIS SCHBEIBER, Jr f
IIIIIIIIIIIIIH
K00M AND B0ABD
Manager
At reasonable rates at Grand
Pacific Hotel, Tentk Street.
ERNOT BROCK,
X
flwai a
X
Best Ears of Con
X
X
'a2Xn-v'
- FASTEST TIME
TO
LIBBEY
The largest selection of the
finest and newest cnttings
ever brooKbt to onr city.
Also a fall line of ... .
f
Pickard
Hui.ri-
Paintctl
China.
TsTsnta Baiaslsiriimai laiaifial
wm HsipejciiMi nfirtfJa
El. J. Nitwihier.
BD OTTAWA
Cjliiiir Gere Shelter
Can do more and better work
than any other shelter sold.
Our wagons will not scatter
yoar grain while on the road to
market or overtax your horsee
with needless heavy draught.
Biggies auNl Carriages
OF THE LATEST AND BEST MAKES.
-All Kinds of-
FARM IMPLEMENTS.
Coaae nnd look onr stock
over before baying :
ll-ksaiitli work and
JIM'S. Saejeia' s1ata ab chnrf
tiee.
VwafHsawf aV awM
JEl afmU
flnak-PinnnaaBaann nV
wWWjaT&v&3B)9rwm '
f
LOUIS SCHREIBER. V
J D. 8T18JC3.
AT LAW.
W OKs Btfeartn door aortii o Fir
k
-'
:
t
ar taw
i BBiaaaa.
OOATOaiJa.laaalgll.
A
.?-
dj.
m
r we
'jv.
t.
ifj5e -it-'issiis
XjvA-'
-J. - J s.
r
i ...-tfe
iftin
&?1&
ii. te."ViS
"JfegBiaii'Jfa.- --
--.----" w.jSA.

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