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The pioneer-review. [volume] (Philip, Haakon County, S.D.) 1920-current, August 05, 1920, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95076623/1920-08-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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glPT. Of HISTOTV
Vol. 13. No. 38
RURAL CREDIT LOANS.
For the special benefit of new
aett iers who may not fully under
stand the laws of the state of
South Dakota in regard to secur
ing farm loans, the Pioneer-Review
will give a brief resume of the ru
ral credits plan which has been in
operation for the past two years,
during which time 4,186 farm loans
have been made amounting to
$16, 422.529.
The farmer who wants to get a
loan on his land has no more trou
ble to get the money from the
state than he would to borrow it
from his banker. There is no red
tape about it. The application is
sent to the examiner of the dis
trict, for the state is divided into
four examiner districts, The ex
aminer comes and looks over^Jthe
land and the improvements, exam
ines the county records, finds out
all about the man and the real val
ue of the property as to the amount
of the loan which he thinks ad
visable to make. The Board acts
on is suggestion and the money is
sent at once to the banker with
whom the farmer deals, together
with the papers for the farmer to
sign, and that is all there is to it.
The whole transaction is quickly
done, and often the farmer has hu|
money within a week after he has
filled uot his application for the
loan. No loan can exceed $10,000,
and loans are made only to men
actually engaged in farming Ind
A*
•t i
Delicious Drinks
Our pure ice cream and real fruit flavors
make the refreshments that you get at our
fountain really nourishing food. And we
try to keep our serving dishes and recep^
tacles as clean and wholesome as the best
housewife in this town keeps her kitchen.
Stop In Here -r
and get a thirst^quencher then take a pail
of cream or sherbet home to the family.
HOT THE CHEAPEST CANDY IN THE WORLD BUT THE BEST
TRY IT AND BE CONVINCED
McPEEK'S CONFECTIONERY
to
centof the appraised value of the o Jho"e
stock-raising. No loan can be
i
made for more than seventy pei
cent of the appraised value of the
land nor for more than the aver
age assessed value of the land for
three previous years.
This borrowed money is from
out side the state, and state bond!
are put up as security. As the far
mers pay off their notes the money
is applied to pay off the bonds. All
the money is absolutely safe, and
so far there have been very few
failures to pay the interest when
due.
In of .aofcg&eiffhhoring states
Wyoming for instance, where not
a dollar of public money is loaned
farmers they are compelled to
pay as high as twelve or thirteen
jhe education to fit your boy or girlV\
properly for life's work is more certain^.
if you are already,§AVIN(i for t&at, de
finite purpose.
THE SAVEST WAY—THE EASY WAY
-r is to open a Saving Account for edu- ,-j
cation, add to it regularly, and by the
y' time you need it you will have an ample
fund on hand.,:*-
JUT DON'T DEfiAY THE
Will buy horses and mules, from
yearling up. IVTust be fat and Matter*
0r
W.ri'eJ^e
Wall, S. D. '30 tf
C. J. STEELE.
at
f.
r1""
SsTARIT
per ecnt on farm loans. One loanother hand Overgaard was ing would be productive of much
firm in this state tdvertises to
place farm loans at six per cent
in Wyoming. The notes are given
at six per cent, but a commission
is charged of four per cent, that
four per cent for each year of the
five years, and this must be be
paid in advance, so that when a
farmer gives his notes and mort
gage for $2,000 he receives in act
ual cash only $800. It will be seen
from this one of the reasons why
South Dakota has made so much
more rapid progress than some
of her sister states, and why it is
preeminently the state where a
man of moderate means can get a
start.
showing plenty of strength and
was always able to get his man in
the pinches.
The fiftteertth inning opened
with a two base hit by Hecken
throne. Carr followed with a sin
gl. Heckenthrone should have scor
ed on this hit, but was inter
fered with by an enthusiastic Phi
lip fan, who in his rooting
THE PIONEER-REVIEW
CONTINUING THE PIONEER AND THE PHILIP WEEKLY REVIEW
safely and stole second. In an at
tempt to catch him at third, Dor
othy was interfered with in mak
ing the throw, which went wild,
allowing the man score.
The score stood one to one for
twelve more innings of the best
ball playing'"that has ever been
witnessed in this part of the coun
try. Both teams played air-tight
ball. A few errors occurred on
both sides but only a few. Both
teams were hitting the ball, but
fast work on the part of the field
ers preventing them from going
safe. Wheaton starred in this re­
pect, pulling down line drives
long flies that looked like
Philip, Haakon County, South Dakota. Thursday, August 5,1920
PHILIP WINS FIFTEEN INNING
GAME.
Overgaard Out-Pitches Bock fa
Hardest Fopght Game Ere?
Witnessed In This Part
The State.
In one of the longest and hardest
fought games of baseball ever
played in this section of South Da
kota Philip won from Inteior on
last Sunday by a score of 2 to 1.
For fifteen innings the two teams
battled, with both pitchers work
ing hard and pitching big league
ball. Nearly every inning one side
or the other had men on the bases
and a hit would have meant a
score,, but at these times the pitch
would tighten up and all hopes
of winning the game in that in
ning go glimmering.
In the first inning both sides
were retired in one, two, three or
der. In the first half of the se
cond, after two men were out*
Dorothy hit safe and stole second, ...
scoring on Overgaard's hit. In the completed. The exact location
last half Hodges for Interior, hit the bridge has not been definite
a n
they
were impossible to be fielded. On the Cheyenne river bridge, but al
one or two ocaassions his fielding so the improvement of the great
was all that saved Philip from de- north and south highway in detail,
feat. Kadoka people and those from far-
After the tenth inning it was jther south are interested irj si^ch
efTdent^that It was a question of, a meeting as are the people from
the endurance of the pithcers.
The i
Interior pitcher, Rock, showed the!is understood that the state high
first. signs of weakening when he (way commission, including the
walked two men in the twelfth. Governor, believe that such a meet-
cam£
too close to the line and both run*
ner and fan came together and
Heckenthorne barely had time to
get baeg to the base. Dorothy
again rose to the occassion with a
hit allowing Heckenthrone to get
in with second score. In
half of the inning Interior succeed
ed in getting a man t# second base
after two men were out. However
owing to an error on
the part of the umpire was given
a fourth strike and was on first
when Overgaard tore his shoe off
in fielding the ball and was unable
to make the throw. Rock, the
next batter up hit a long fly to
right field which Wheaton pulled
down after a stiff run, this play
retiring the side and giving Philip
the victory by a 2 to 1 score.
her
About twenty-five automobiles
from here took over more than a
hundred fans, and this in addition
to the Interior people and those
form the surrounding towns made
un a howling aggregation of back
ers for both the teams. One Phi
lip booster tore up his hat, and
came home bare headed but happy.
We can say that it seldom that
two teams as evenly matched as
these, play as many close games,
and all of them goed, clean exhib
itions, without the usual rag-chew
ing and kicking. We do not ex
pect to see a bqfctcr jgarne fqr some
time to come.
The line-up:
Philip Interior
Wheejer lit B. Solon 2b
Fitzgerald
J$b
Margins rf
J. Solon
Wheaton If ..- T. Gilctorist ss
Heckenthrone H. Gilchrist lb
Carr cf 5. Hodges rf
Dorothy e
Overgaard :v^.
r" :ft.
GOOD ROADS MEETING
PLANNED FOR PHILIP
rj Jackson county has lately cele
brated the completion of the
new
bridge across White River south
of Kadoka with a monster road
meeting. Construction work
good.
They should be aounded defin
itely on the matter and their
wishes and plans learned. This is
a matter for the Philip Commer
cial Club to give early thought to
and take such action tbe situa
tion may demand.
IN PHILIP
n
the road leading from the south
end of the bridge is practical K
completed, and the construct
soon commence upon Ihe strip
leading from the north end of tin
bridge to the town of Kadoka
Both of these are federal aid pro
jects, and when completed, $150,(htit
will ha#e .been spent upon the
n o
called Whit? River project, and i
good road and a good crossing i
the river will be the result.
But this is a link only in a great
north and south highway stretch
ing across the state from north
south, from the Nebraska to tin
North Dakota line. The largi i
problem yet remains," and that i
the bridging of the Cheyenne
er and the construction of deer
roads to reach the bridge wh-
located, as we understand it, a
there is much varyjng counsel
to where it sAould be put.
road will pass through Philip, u
doubtedly, but the location of
bridge on the Cheyenne is not
termined. Several sites have be
mvstigated by the state enginee
and each of them cails for a brid^
one thousand feet in length. Th
magnitude of this proposed brad
appears when contrasted with the
Whitp River bridge., which is only
three hundred feet in length.
Lately it as been suggested that
a big good roads meeting be held
at Philip some time this fall to
discuss not only the location of
the northern part of the state. It
-Thirteen Years Ago—
We had four flourishing saloons
and there was talk that another
would come in the fall. H. C.
Peckham was the proprietor of the
Corner Saloon J. E. .Taggart, of
the 73 Saloon?' Pete Joslyn of the
Oak Saloon and Hess & Whitney
of the Gem. No one remained who
had the price. Reasonably tall ones
could be purchased for ten cents.
On July 22, 23 and 24, United
Statf|^!ommsisioner Rryon Clow,
who "always at Philip," with
his u^iiitants took the testimony
in sixty-four final proof* cases.
On July 25, Will R. Walpole, flow
Mayor Walpole, was as the result
of a fake announcement, sprung
as a practical joke by two of his
frends, treated to an old fashioned
chivarari and rice shower. The
Bad River News in its version of
the affair ?ays that Mr. Walpole
explained that he was not mar
ried at all, only **thin!|iiig of get~
ting married.*'
After being hung up in moving
the First State Bank settled on
the corner of Pine Street and Cen
ter Avenue on July 19th. This is
the present site of the bank's new
building. Its earliest location was
in a hardware store near the pre
sent location of the C. M. Lloyd
home.
Circuit Cbtusfc was in session ai
Fort Pierre during the whole of
the month of July. Several of our
sporting fraternity journeyed toil
somely to the county seat seventy-
Swett cf i five miles away, and paid fines for
F. Solon 3b! gambling. It was right there that
Freemole If, the agitation for county division
Hoover ss Rock began. There was no needplacing
Roberts fe^aeed llargulis for such inconveniences as these upon
Philip in the twelfth. lour gamblers when they could
Hits: Off Overgaard 0 off Rock just as well Jbe fined right here
8: Struck out: by Overgaard 11 *t home.
by Rock 10„ Base on balls, 2 byj
Rock. Eat at the "Let's Eat Here Cafe"
Umpires: Fancher of Philip and in Philip. Best Meals and court
Swan of Interior, eous treatment.
wmdm
•*'n» I
Df'L&qp
FOR FRESH BEEF PORKt
MUTTON VEAL ANDLM©
SMOKED HEAT S1IJ M££r!
34'JSACE ID HAM
iFlPLEA.SE YOU
TCLt OTHERS-V
NED R0NN1NC,
PROPRIETOR
UJUUMfM
THfe CYCLONE CELLAR.
In the early days of the Dakotas
and other western States no farm
or city home was considered com
plete without a cyclone cellar.
This cyclone cellar was construct
ed along simple lines by first dig
ging a hole in the ground, and
a heavy enough
roof to support the sod that was
invariably placed on top. The cel
lars were popular before the era of
cement and concrete, as most of
the cellars were boarded up on the
inside. When the damp earth got
in its fine work a cyclone cellar
was a pretty mouldy smelling pro
position and aws not calculated as
a storage place for valuable an
tique iron or steeel work. Shelves
were a necessary adjunct and be
cause the cellar was always cool,
it made an admirable storage place
for vegetables and preserves in
times of calm as well as a place of
safety for the family in time of
danger from the cyclones and high
winds which if we are to believe
te old timers used to sweep Across
the plains on schedule time, almost
every day.
One of the functions of the cellar
was to afford a slide for the chil
dren, the sloping roof being quite
ideal for this pastime. Many of the
grass stains that used to soil the
children's clothing could be traced
right to this spot. As^i source of
enjoyments it beat 'holloring"
down a rain barrel or climbing the
PfOWtlar*
Y
YOUR DAD DOES NOT
BUY THE RIGHT
KIND OF MEATS
You Can Depend On Our Meats
Sanitary., Nutritious, Gratifying
CITY MEAT MARKET
!FtDO?rr PLEASE
TELL HZ
PHONE 24-
00
'pHE Ladies of this community will
here a large stock of all kinds of
toilet waters, perfumes, complexion
powders and other necessaries, include
ing your favorite brand.
Call and see for yourself 'Phone if you
can't come* We fill telephone order*
i
PHILIP, S.D.
GEM THEATRE PROGRAM oo
Friday and Saturday, Aug 8*7
Wm. Desmond
A FIGHT FOR LOVE
FORD WEEKLY
We*. find Thurs. An*?.
BIG SELECT FEATURU
Friday and Saturday, Aug. 13-14
A BIG SPECIAL ff 1
'THE MAN WHO STAYED HOME*
*^«f *Jt
:aM-
apple tree all hollow.
You will still see a cyclone cellar
occassionaly, but none of the
houses being erected by the ycninj
er generation boasts of a place iit
which to hide from the wind kinjf V
It has disappeared along with
sod house and the log cabin.
The cyclone cellar was never in
vogue, as. such, in the region about
Philip, or for that matter, in any
of the counties west of the Missou*
ri river. Of course we had cellars,
constructed after the fashion of
the old-time cyclone cellar, but we
called it the "root cellar." It is
quite true that our early home
steaders may hace had some re
mote idea of retreating to the
"root cellar" with a child under
each arm in case of a storm, but
he never confessed it by calling'
lis place of refuge a cyclone cellar.
Starring i
KING BAGGOf
=5
5 V- i
Face and Vanishing Cream
v Cold Creams
v
Tooth Paste',-*
Talcums at 30c md 6(k 4-
The Pioneer Pharmacy
THE NYAL STQRE w,|
y£:V
\c
ihftW
W
YOU WILL FIND THEM NOT
ONLY SATISFYING AS TO
TASTE, BUT FULL OF STRENG­
TH, MUSCLE BUILDING QUAL
ITIES, ALWAYS.
I
W
T~
\4
"mm
«.07
3D
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