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The pioneer-review. [volume] (Philip, Haakon County, S.D.) 1920-current, October 21, 1920, Image 13

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95076623/1920-10-21/ed-1/seq-13/

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OTTUMWA NEWS
v
Th«re are worse thing* about
sowietism^ than whiskers.
The merchant of Nowlin and
the banker, the Deckers of Ot
tumvva, Mrs. M. O. Sherwood and
her children and her fathore were
dinner guests of Mr. au«L Mrs. C.
1*.v Munn, Sunday.
The candidate for congress on
the non-partisan ticket gave an
inereating talk at Ottumwa on the
The average woman will tell her
friend almost anything except her
age,/
4
Mr*, ^Tay Decker had the mis
fortune to sprain her ankle so
badly a few days ago as to make
getting out of the house impossi
ble. Jay says he does'nt know
if she stepped on it and then
sprained it or sprained it apd then
stepped on it. He says what docs
seem perfectly clear nobody is
working around the joint this
week but father.
Wm. Martin returned from Ms
Chicago shipping trip Monday and
says he found the market very
low.
Mi* J. Singleton htm a
fnenn from the east visiting her
and family for a few days.
The school teachers from this
neck of the woods kept things
pretty lively on their way to and
from Philip Friday and Saturday.
Crooks are getting- to hi nearly
as bold as landlords.
Wm. Shoun of Manlia was do
ing business in Midland Monday.
Perhaps this generation has
never behild~9» swift and com
plete a change from popularity to
unpopularity as has been brought
in the case of Mr. Wilson in the
last eighteen or twenty months.
Strangest oi all transformations
has been that from the attitude of
sympathy toward him at the be
ginning of his sickness to bitter
dislike while yet he remained abed
People seem to dislike* the presi
dent bpcause of the attitude ha
has iken that he cannot make a
mistdRce, for his cold aloofness
and vanity because he feels that
revesrsal of policy or any switch
ing from his own expressed opin
ions does'nt call for explanation
and many other things too num
erous to menttori.
GANDY
has represented ":1 South Da
koia i
IN CONGRESS
for three terms. His record there
is one of achievement. He has
made good. By hard work he has
won a place of respect and in
fluence in the House. He has been
faithful to the District and to the
Nation.
ON THE JOB FOR WESTERN
SOUTH DAKOTA
has been his daily aim. The ex
perience and training gained in
nearly six years in the House and
in assisting thousands of home
folks with cases before govern
mental departments enables hiin
to mm better •. e th«i £$strict.
HARRY L. GANDY
Democratic Nominee n
His Own Bills
or amendments provided
terment
.*•
i*
tor Non-
Cintlgrtions Additional Homesteads,
Black Hills Foiest Reserve Horr.e
st ends-. 30,000 acre addition to South
1kota's big State Park, Highway
funds on the Pine Ridge and Stand
ing Rock Reservations, permanent
railroad bridge at Cha mberlain,
coaveylngr to city of Lernmon the
land on which the city reservoir i3
located, appropriation
to
of
assist in
building bridge aeros3 Cheyenne
river rn south boundary of Cheyenne
reservation, livestock demonstration
work on the Government Kxperimcn
tal Farms at Ardmore and Newell,
new school building and many ether
improvements at tne Rapid City In
dian School, continuation of
all claims
the
Deadwood Assay ofliee, tlnal settle
ment
of the
Sioux In­
dians againat the Government, as
sistance in construction
of
water­
works system on the Government
townslte at Newell* safeguarding
tribal funds
of
Indiana
by limiting
expenditures therefrom
to appro­
priation by Congress, and many
other things
for
the
benefit and bet­
of
Western
South Dakota.
HE ASSISTED
In passing the Section Homestead
Bill, th« rural credits law, the act
providing for federal assistance In
the construction and maintenance
of highways, several amendments
providing for the closing of the rolls
of Indian tribes
and
many
le
the division Of
tribal funds, thus hastening toe final
settlement of tribal affairs, the
laws under which the recent
iding higher pay th« soldflers,
ana marines, liberal family
great war was foug1$ and •o n, ii
eluding higher pay f&T th* soldier
-jllors
...
alloi
generous
MNswhl a
mimr* yoa
G*Hdy has endeavored to hon«
WtfWint the people of this
tmt
Mrs. Agee made a business trip
to Midland Tuesday.
Josephine Murphy the little
girl of Mr. and Mrs. James Mur
phy is staying at the home of Mr.
and Miss Mooney this winter in
order that she. may attend the
Manila
school, "v
A colt of J. O. Peterson fell
in the well or cistern a few days
ago and took the efforts of nearly
the entire community to get
him out. And after he was gotten
out thirty cents would have been
a fair price for him.
The farmers in the Ottumwa
district -finished threshing last
week and all seem fairly well
pleased with the grain yield.
Jack Suarton started breaking
on the Fred Foland quarter Tues
day morning. This entire quarter
was broken a few years ago but
lack of wind or muscle or some
other good reason it was allowed
to go back. It will not for lack
of wind of the present owner if
it again goes to grass.
It is reported that Herb
Qrah-
am near Ottumwa and Nowlin was
married In Colorada a few days
ago. No particulars of the mar
riage is known at this time.
Charles Hand made a business
trip to Midland Monday, reutrning
Tuesday with a load of freight
for the Manila Store.
Charles Meader is hauling frei
ght and coal from Midland and
Philip these daya.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stinson drove
to Midland business Tuesday
morning,.
James McKay, traveling sales
man for the Albright Wholesale
house was in Ottumwa Tuesday
He is now driving a new Dodge
car. Says a Ford never was any
good. Things seeln to have chang
ed since "Willie died."
MUST FIGHT OR
BREAK OUR WORD
Preparation lor War Necessary
"If We Join League of Nations,
Declares American "Ace."
The following is the tecond of
four articles by Capl. "Eddie"
Rickenbacker on "VT/iy Soldiers Are
A ainst the League of Nations."
Capt. Rickenbacker was the ace of
arcs in American aviation on the
front in France. His acquaintance
among the soldiers of the late war
is nationwide. When he speaks for
them, he speaks what he knows.
By CAPT. 'EDDIE' RICKENBACKER.
Chapter 2.
If article 10 means what It says, It
**efUis war—more war than the United
Snites'ever had before. If we pledge
ourselves to preserve "against exter
na! agression" every other member of
the league we have got to fight or
liidik our word.
If we atT» going to fight, we must get
ready to fight. That means a great
deal. Only a man who was In the war
knows how much. We can't contract
for a lot of war by signing article 10
and' then not prepare for It.
The United States has fine fighting
men none finer. Every soldier who
was in Frunee knows this. And when
they got Into the war these men were
warlike enough. But they never felt
that war was a regular business with
them. As the people In Europe under
stand it, they were not military profes
sionals. Aid the Americon people are
not professionals. They are a lighting
people, when called out, but In peace
they refuse to be military.
We went into the war unprepared,
and were protected by our allletj while
we made preparation. We were in the
war 19 months and we came out still
unnrnpared. Tel we spent $20,000,000,
uOU.
We »»ad only 196 all^planes at the
front In France at the end of the war,
and not ou« of them was a lighting
plane. Yet w t»peui aiui« than a bil
lion dollars for aircraft. 'iue soldier
of the air knows that.
We did not make our o*«a gas
hough we tried. We did not us«* our
wn grenades. We did not ha\c our
own Uquid fire we did not have iny
American tanks. The soldier of the
line knows that and he knows ti»«s
thousands of Jives these failures cost
us.
We cannot afford to go Into another
war thus unprepared. It would cost
too many lives and too much money.
If we contract for wars all over* the
worl£ we have got to prepare or suf
fer awful losses.
A soldier who was In Europe during
he war realizes what a burden a pol
icy of militarism would put on the
American people. He understand* how
terrible would be the losses, under ar
ticle 10. tf a policy of military prepara
tion were not adopted.
The soldier to against bringing Euro
pean militarism to America and he is
against aacflftcfog American flesh and
Mood conflict# far which we art not
If we go Into the League of
we weald have to cfeooMft*-^
ic. t»
mi mm
if
i
AVIATION "ACE"
OPPOSES
I.
Covenant of Nations Has but One
Meaning, War, Declares Capt.
"Eddie" Rickenbacker.
SPEAKS FOR BOYS WHO FOUGHT
Says Lawyers May Argue Point, but
Soldiers Would Interpret Our Sig
nature Only as Pledge to Fight
By CAFT.'EDDIE' RICKENBACKER
Chapter I.
For a soldier, the League of Nations
has just one meaning—war. It is a
contract to fight. If we Join the league
we agree to fight when willed to to
do so.
International lawyers and diploma
tists may argue this point. Some say
that we may sign the league covenant
and still not fight unless we want.
They argue that, after our allies cull
on us, we sttU are at liberty to go In
or stay out.
The soldier does not look "at the
league covenant in this way. He doe?
not bother with the law or diplomacy.
We sign a contract we must keep It.
We give a promise we must redeem
It. He does not even think about
cdpt.
"Eddie" Rickenbacker.
whether it Is morals or law that bind*
a*. only kno^s that If we give
pledge we are going to stand by It.
Take, for instance, article 10. the
war article of the league. The soldier
reads there that the members of the
league "undertake to respert ai\d pre
serve against external aggression" the
territory aud independence of alt other
members. Thai Is the language
of the covenant. The soldier trans
lates that language In his mind Into
United States. He then would put the
pledge, if signed by ihe United State*,
in about this form:
"The United States undertakes to
reject and preserve against external
aggression the territory of all mem
bers of the league." Add to this that
to the soldier "external aggression" Is
merely a polite -oame for war and you
have article 10 as he sees it. Every
thing else Is to him just camouflage.
We give our word to stand ready to
light, on vail, for any other nation In
the league that Is suffering from a case
of "external aggression." Once given,
we have to keep It.
The trouble might corae In China, or
Hiam, Greece, Indie or Egypt. We
might be called to light to keep 36.000,
000 Chinese In Shantung under Jap
anese rule, or to hold India In the
British empire we might not like the
job we might even sympathize with
the Chinese, or Hindus, but we should
have given our word, in a plain con
tract, and we should have to keep It.
That is the way a plain soldier
looks at the league contract, and nine
ty-flve in a hundred soldiers do aot
like ft They have seen foreign na
tlons and know they are foreign to us.
They know that every foreign nation
In war or peace, acts first and last for
itself. If a foreign nation gets Into
•var while acting
yin
its own interests,
fhey do not see why they should be
shipped to Europe or Asia to help it
they do not understand why American
blood should be shed to build up any
foreign nation. Therefore, they are
against taking the pledge they are
againat article
10
20
0
Which Must Be Kept.
The following is the first of
four articles by Capt. "Eddie"
Rickenbacker on "Why Soldiers Are
Against the League of Nations
Capt. Rickenbacker was the ace of
aces in American aviation on the
front in France. His acquaintance
among the soldiers of the late war
is nationwide. When he speaks for
{hem, he speaks what he knows.
i
they axe against
the covenant
To fight In war la the solenmest
business on earth. Those who fought
itnow this better than anybody else,
and they are against fighting for any
country axcept the United States.
Buy & 4kx
when at home
in SAd4 ~tt9ilQNl
tem Fletumm
9 MILK COWS
4 YEARLING STEERS"
7 YEARLING HEIFER#
WM
,-v-
'tf'
cash on
of cifrars for use
evening*. The fort
ild at
wfchW
Hr ow 4fpi
turns
over $10.00.
Mary E.
EVERYBODY WANTS
We are giving tfreift to you
01 Off on all Mens and Boys
lO Suits and Overcoats
Sheep Lined Clothing and Leather Vests
Sale Starts Monday, October 25th
Come Early While the Assortment is Complete
THE TONY CLOTHING COMPANY
Pierre, South Dakota
1 will sell at Public Auction, to the highest bidder, at my ft fafclif
miles north and one mile west of Grindstone Postoffice, on
Auctioneer
Commencing at 1:00 P. M,
4
4
*$ JSC
j$'
jr. O-wf'
12 Horses 2 to 8 years old
1 nearly sew Keystone Hay Loader 1 Moline Sulky plow with breaker bottom
1 set Driving Harness 1 Disc Plow 1 Five Foot HcCormick Mower
TKRMSr Sums under $10.00 cash. On sums over $10.00 six montlis time will be
given on bankable paper bearing interest at 10 per cent. 2 per cent discount
'3
5 TWO YEAR OLD STEERS
1 GRADE HEREFORD BULL
iCALVES
12 HOGS, weighing about 75 fHmnds
.. V. •, r- it.
20
T7e want the public te feel
th we are wi*h them in this
campaign for lower prices—
if*-
'jf« -i
"."' .•• .- &&••••:' •*..•. e0
rr«v» we 9T9i the greatest
value giving that you ever
**w—
$70
V
if'Wt
'W'
e r/-~f
$80 Suits and Overcoats
i Now $40.00
f&5 Suits and Overcoats
Now $20.00
$15 Suits and Overcoats
Now $12.00
112 Salt* and Overcoats
Now $ 9.60
4
-.'1$
A
i
01
10
We are not overloaded. We
du?d sell this stock bt fine
clothing for the regular
prices-—
Hut people expect
v-
tower
prices, and because people ex
pect lower prices, we are go
1*IC to see that yon £et them
iB HART SCTTAFFNFK &
MARX and STYLE PLUS
Suits and Overcoats, Leather
Vests and Sheep Lined Goods
^Phis means thiit we will sell
jfreat deal of fine mcrchan
rfise for a lot less than we
iwn^cted. But that does not
make any dilference-r
-4
y-J
'V '-*1
Now $64.00
Suits and
Overcoats
Now $56.00
450 Suits and Overcoats
.ij.
•svdsw"
for
S
w*„"
'A
'M
A.

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