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Tazewell Republican. [volume] (Tazewell, Va.) 1892-1919, August 26, 1897, Image 2

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The TazewellRepnblican
rublished every Thursday at
TAZEWELL, VA.,
?TO?
WILLIAM C. PENDLETON,
Editor and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTIONS.
Republican, one year, cash in advance . . 8 1 00
Subscrir.lions on time. 1 50
Republican and X. Y. Tribune, one year, . 1 25
ADVERTISING RATES furnished on applica?
tion. Correspondence solicited.
The publishers of Tin: RXFCBUCAM are not re?
sponsible for opinions expressed by Correspon?
dents.
The REPrBi.iCAX is entered at the 1'ost-office at
Tazewell, Virginia, as second-class matter.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 1S97.
For House of Delegates:
WILLIAM. B. SPRATT.
NO CONVENTION.
At the meeting of the Republican State
committee,held at Lynchburg last week, it
was determined that no State convention
?hould be held this year, and no ticket
placed in the field for Republicans to vote
for. In our judgment it would have been
better to hold a convention and nominate
a full ticket. This was about the unan?
imous sentiment of the Republicans oi
Tazewell. The State committee, however,
by a very decided majority, almost a unit,
decided that it would be inexpedient to
hold a convention or run a ticket. Our
proposition was that a convention should be
called and let it determine whether a
ticket should be placed in the field. We
believe the committee has assumed an
authority that did not belong to it, but we
see no way now for making tilings better.
If Col. Lamb should call a convention and
be supported by a majority of the com?
mittee,confusion would only follow. This
being true the decision of the committee
will have to be submitted to, and nearly
one hundred and fifty thousand Republi?
cans will be deprived of the privilege oi
voting in the gubernatorial election.
We do not know whether there will be an
opposition ticket to the Democratic candi?
date placed in the field. The Republican
will not be willing to support any candi?
date who does not come before the people
as a regular candidate of our party. In the
future,during the progress of the campaign,
we will give our Republican readers the
best counsel we can as to any action they
should take.
Tu e present prices for wheat ought to en?
courage the formen of Tazewell county to
plow more and so>v an increased crop this
Fall. Trie county will not make enough
wheat to supply its own population with
"bread for another year, though it is much
better olfin that particular this year than
last. We urge upon our fanner friends the
importance of raising more wheat. Lei
every farmer in the county try to raise
more in 1S93 than he did in 1897.
Tue Democrats are still saying that
ProviJencc Las sent up the price of wheat
and is bringing about good times. The
K'tjhmond Dispatch says: "Nature hat
d) ie much more than the Republicans
to induce a return of prosperity." Some?
how nature and prosperity are always
aga:nst the Democrats. They must be a
uuai er set of fellows than we have claimed
them to be.
-?*???
The Chattanooga Tradesman of August
16th says: Reports from special correspon?
dents at prominent business centres of the
South continue encouraging. Both mer?
chants and rriinufactmers are looking for?
ward to a large volume of trade in the
FaH.
The rich gold finds in the Klondike
regions are not exciting as much interest
among American farmers as the rich gold
finds they are now getting from their
wheat fields.
Iiis poor and inefficacious political lead?
ership that isalways creating discord in ti e
ranks. We fear that is the only kind the
Republicans in Virginia are destined to
have.
Wheat has reached the dollar mark
und silver does not move upward. What
now about tiie theory of brother Bryan?
We wonder if Mr. Bryan has seen the
"General?"
COLORADO'S PROSPERITY.
Even the Silver Advocates Have to Ac?
knowledge It.
Denver Times, Silver.]
Take the yield of Colorado in wheat,
corn and oats in 1S9G. as reported by the
newspapers in their annual summary on
the first of the year, and compare that
yield with the estimated production for
1897. In ascertaining the difference in
dollars, we shall take Chicago quotations
today and of a year ago today as the basis.
These were as understated:
1896. 1897.
Wheat. 54 83
Corn. 22] 2SJ
Oats. 15* 18
The yield of wheat last year was 3,500,
000 bushels, valued at SI,890,000.
The yield of wheat this year is 4,666,6G6
bushels, valued at $3,873,332.
The yield of corn last year was 3,000,000
bushels, valued at SG75.000.
The yield of corn this year is 4,000,000
bushels, valued at 81,160,000.
The yield of oats last year was 2,665,000
bushels, valued at $413,075.
The yield of oats this year is 3,553,333
bushels, valued at $639,599.
Summarized, we have the following as
the increased amount of money which our
fanners will receive this year overJast year
for the three crops mentioned:
Wheat .. 11,983.332
Com 485,000
Oats. 226,524
Total. 12,094,856
Or nearly $6 for every man,, woman and
child in the State.
These figures can only be approximately
correct, but as such are valuable. The in?
creased pioduction is based entirely upon
estimate, and must necessarily be, since the
crop is not yet.entirely harvested; but, as
we have said, the estimate is a concensus of
the opinions of a number of men engaged
in raising these crops, arrived at by them
through experience and obseivation.
We have taken no account of the in?
creased production and enhanced price of j
rye, barley, potatoes and the yaiious grades |
of hay. Those of our readers with a sta?
tistical bent can, if they choose, carry the
calculation down through the list, aided by
the following report of the value of the
crop of 1890:
Rye $ 37,0001
Barlev 126,000
Potatoes 1,800,000
Alfalfa .... 2,000,000
Meadow hay and other non
irrigated crops 1,000,000
Seeded giassother than alfalfa 730,000
Ttie fruit yield of the State promises also
to show a decided gain in bulk with rather
better prices than obtained last year. The
value of the crops last year approximated
$3,000,000. The live stock interests of j
the State will also record a handsome in?
crease in aggregate receipts of cash from
customers.
SILVER'S FALL HURTS LABOR.
Striking Effect of the Decrease in Value
on Silver Mexico.
Washington, Aug. 2o.?The practical ef?
fects in a silver country of the fall of silver
are set forth in a strong light by a report
received by State Department from Consul
GeneralJ. G.Donnelly,ofNeuvoLarendo,
Mex. Mr. Donnelly's report is brief and to
the point as follows:?
"I have the honor to report marked rise
in the price of all commodities in Mxico
as the result of the resent fall in the price
of silver. This was tobe expected of im?
ported goods, but domestic products and
even rents have risen.
"There have been no corresponding ad?
vance, however, in wages or salaries.
Labor stays on its silver basis."
This report is in line with other infor?
mation reaching here. The Mexican
Government is receiving silver in payment
for faxes, while it is compelled to pay gold
on the interest and principal of its debt.
The Mexican dollar is at present worth
about 4o cents, so that it takes $2.5o of
Mexican silver to pay every $1 in gold of
debt. This is proving a tremendous drain
upon the Government.
At the same time, as Mr. Donnelly
points out, the price of commodities has
risen measured in Mexican silver.
It is noticeable that the government and
labor are the two elements to suffer most,
the Government being drained by its gold
payments, and labor suffering by having
its wages remain on a silver basis while
silver is declining.
loss on u. S. government silver.
The Government has lost approximately
$66,000,000 on the decline of silver within
fourteen months. This is ba.c.el on
treasury figures of the original cost of silver
bullion and the value ofthat metal.
The process has been going on so grad?
ually that the effect of the decline on the
Government holdings has not before at?
tracted public attention. At present,how?
ever, with the price of silver declining
every day, attention was directed to the
loss sustained by the Government on its
cor.ls of silver now stored in the Govern?
ment vaults. This led to the comparison
of original ccsts with present selling price,
disclosing the remarkable aggregate of loss
a'ready sustained.
The accumulation of silver has been
going on steadily since lS78,firit under the
Bland-Allison act and then under the
Sherman law.
Without offering any comment on the
figures, Director of the Mint Preston to-day
gave the amount of the Government's
silver holding, the original cost, etc. This
shows that the Government's stock of silver
cost $464,210,263.
total reaches ?200,000,000.
Taking the valueof this quantity of silver
to-day?ti e quotation of August 17 being
taken for convenience?its value is approx?
imately $250,255,572. Thus the value of
the Government's purchase of silver have
depreciated almost half, the loss aggre?
gating over S2oo,ooo,ooo.
But the most noticeable loss has been
in the last fourteen months, due to the
exceptional decline during that period.
On July 1, 1S9G, the market value of the
Goverment's stock of silver was $318,641,
875. Comparing this with the original
cost, it will appear that the Government
loss in the last fourteen months is approx?
imately $66,003,000.
The fluctuations of silver have been con?
stant since the Government began laying
:in its large stock, but never before has the
value of this stock reached so low an ebb.
In 187S, under the Bland-Allison act,
the silver purchases made by the Govern?
ment ran as high as $1.21 an ounce. This
was occasioned to some extent by the de?
mand of the Government in order to se?
cure a sufficient supply. The rate was
only eight cents short of what it would
have been with the metals standing at 16 J
to 1.
Gradualy the price declined, until in
1S90, shortly before the Sherman act was
passed, the Government was paying 92
cents per ounce.
Under the Sherman act the demand for
silver occasioned another rise. In Septem?
ber, 1890, the rate was $1.16 per ounce.
! With the closing of the India mints and
the cessation of our own silver purchases
in November, 1893, the steady decline be?
gan, which has continued ever since.
japan coinage at 32 to 1.
As an evidence of present conditions a
Treasury authority states that Japan's
recent readjustment of her coinage was
made at a ratio of 1 to 32, as between gold
and silver. This authority added that the
recent decline in silver would make the
ratio to-day about 1 to 3S.
The effect of this decline is brought
home very forcibly, now that the loss it
occasions to the Government i s estimated.
Referring to this loss, an official stated
to-day that it amounted to more than all
the battleships and cruisers which the
Government had built in recent years.
It was about half, he added, of the
amount expended during the last year for
pensions, and this is the largest single ex?
penditure of the Government.
AD M'GINTY.
The Appropriate Motto for Populism
Just Now.
Kansas City Journal]
Ad astra per aspera is the motto of wheat.
Ad McGinty per Populism is the motto of
silver.
As wheat bobs up among the stars while
silver goes down to the original levels
whence it came, the voice of the tinhorn
demagogue is heard in the land announ?
cing or calling for new issues.
What shall the slogan be? AH sorts of
answers are heard. War on railroads; war
on insurance companies; war on aliens;
war for socialism; war on co-operation and
consolidation; war on sound money; war on
United States courts; war on anything if
only the gory path leads to office.
But meantime wheat goes up and silver
goes down! Can it be that Bryan was a
liar? Also Leedy? Also Lease? Also
Peffer? Also the rest?
A President Who Was Born Approachable.
Washington Star.]
The President is making no slight sacri?
fice of personal comfort in the liberality
with which he grants interviews even dur?
ing the time specifically announced as de?
voted to a well earned rest. The loss of
ease he thus sustains, however, brings its
reward. It is no small thing to have the
reputation of being approachable. The
quality does not depend on a mere readi?
ness for sacrifice. It is as distinctly a gift
as an ear for music or the knack ofpicture
mak'ng. Solitude is a simple and effectual
refuge from embarrassment. To be "ap?
proachable" a man in public life must have
the keen insight into character which en?
ables him to estimate the moral caliber of
a stranger, sufficient dignity to prevent any
apparent solicitude that it will be over?
looked and the tact to hold requests in
abeyance or to deny them without offend?
ing. This phase of Pa?*8ident McKinley's
character is appreciated by the American
public, regardless of political affiliation.
Men may achieve greatness or have it
thrust upon then,, but they must be born
"approachable."
-??*
PERSONAL NOTES.
Ex-Congressman Woodman, of Illinois,
is preparing to start for Alaska.
Mrs, Louisa Sebru, of Fayette, Mo., is
said to be the oldest representative of the
postal service in this country. She held
office iu 1S12.
Governor Pingree, of Michigan, de?
livered an address to the Dutch inhabitants
of Holland, Mich., on the celebretion of
the semi-centennial of the settlement of the
town, yesterday.
Justice Stephen J. Field, who has now
served longer on the Supreme Court bench
than anyone before him, is engaged in the
study of the Oriental languages. Senator
Hoar is pursuing the same study.
Thomas Jefferson Sappington, who died
recently near St. Louis, saved General
Grant from captive by the Confederates
during the civil war. Some men were ly?
ing in ambush for the General, but Sap
pington learned of their plans and warned
Grant in time.
President McKinley, when at Camp
Grout, in Vermont, was presented with a
barrel of spruce gum, which bore the
motto: "The land of Stark and Warner
welcomes you.'' A barrel presented to
Senater Proctor bore the motto, "Nuggets
from oor own Klondike."
Senator Vest is said to have lost much of
his popularity among his constituents of
late years. There was a time when he had
a joke or a good word for everyone, but
Washington life is said to have made him
dignified and serious, and as a consequence
he has lost many of his followers.
Ethen Allen Hitchcock, thenewminister
to Russia, is a great-grandson of Colonel
Ethan Allen, who captured Fort Ticonde
roga, "in the name of the Great Jehovah
and the Continental Congress." His grand?
father married the second daughter of
Eihan Allen, and took a prominent part
in the early history of Vermont, and was
made United States Circuit Judge for the
Second Circuit by President John Adams.
It is now announced that R. C. Leh?
mann, Harvard's rowing coach of last year,
will return next year to again train the
crew of that university.
Miss Jennie Revert, of New York, is
said to be the only woman in the country
studying veterinary science with the inten?
tion of entering the profession.
Hon. Allen D. Candler, of Atlanta, who
is prominently mentioned as a candidate
for Governor, is a Confederate veteran
and it is said that, if he is elected, he will
probably be the last veteran executive of
the State.
Mr. Gustave le Rouge, a Persian literary
man, proposes that the rich shall send their
half-worn clothing to a "vestry of arts and
letters" in order that needy young artists
and literary men may get them free.
Lord Wolseley has presented a regiment
with a flag, and in speaking of the
fact that flags will probably not be
carried in the next great war, said: "In
future it would be madness and a crime to
order any man to carry colors into action.
You might quite as well order him to be
assassinated." m
Mr. Moorfield Storey delivered a lec?
ture in Boston recently on Cnarles Sum
ner, the anti-slavery Senator. In speak?
ing of Mr. Sumner lie said: " 'Our coun?
try right or wrong' was never in his
thoughts. He thought it the duty of every
patriot to keep his countiy right, to pre?
vent it going wrong."
????
On last Friday at l:4o o'clock, when
September wheat in the New York market
reached the long-talked-of goal of one dol?
lar a bushel, tremenduous sensation pre?
vailed, and the news was greeted with
cheers from half a thousand throats.
Biliousness
Is caused by torpid liver, which prevents diges?
tion and permits food to ferment and putrify In
the stomach. Then follow dizziness, headache,
Hood's
Insomina, nervousness, and,
If not relieved, bilious fever
or blood poisoning. Hood's
Pills stimulate the stomach,
rouse the liver, cure headache, dizziness, con?
stipation, etc. 25 cents. Sold by all druggists.
The only Fills to take with Hood's Sarsaparilia.
Pills
Don't
Think
Because the Soda Water you drink at some fountains
makes you sick that all soda water is just alike, but a
glass from our fountain never makes anyone sick.
Why?
Because we exercise the greatest care in preparing
our syrups from fresh, ripe fruit and granulated sugar,
and keep them in porcelain containers well iced. It is
the sour, corroded, impure syrup that makes you sick.
Ours never sours nor corrodes. Nothing but Mitchell's
Transparent Ice used in our Soda Water.
Try Om~
Alaska Snow--ball!
It is a novelty and is pronounced unequalled as a
drink.
TAZEWELL DRUG CO.,
GEO. H. LANDON. M'GR.
POBST &WINGO,
China and Glassware;
Have You Examined Our Stock and Prices?
, We have fine Carlsbad and Haviland Dinner and
Tea Sets, handsomely decorated and of elegant de?
signs. China Dessert Sets, Berry Sets in China or
glass, After-dinner and Individual Coffee Sets, beau?
tiful China Statuettes and Vases, Jardinears, Cake
Baskets and, in fact, the most complete line of China
and Queens ware ever seen in this section. We have
Glass Tumblers in great quantities, fine and cheap.
Flower Pots all sizes.
Baseball Goods and Fishing Tackle.
We have a complete stock of Baseball Goods and
Fishing Tackle.
The best Cigars, Chewing and Smoking Tobacco.
Fruit Jars.
200 dozen Fruit Jars, one-half gallons and quarts.
Lower prices than ever.
POBST &, WINGO,
Pobst Building, Tazewell, Va.
<XXXXX><XXXXX>CO<X><XXXXX>0<>
Peery & Dodd f
Have just received a Car Load of Earthen
and Stone Ware, the finest quality. Ves?
sels from one-half gallon to six gallons in
size.
Fishing Tackle.
We have a nice stock of Fishing Tackle
?-jointed rods, reels, grass and linen lines,
hooks, with and without snoods.
FRUIT JARS.
We have a large quantity of Fruit Jars, all
sizes, which we are selling at bottom prices.
All kinds of Staple and Fancy Groceries.
PEERY & DODD. $
x>o<xx><x><xxxxx><xxx><x><x>o
HARDWARE AND FURNITURE.
/ All kinds of Hard- ]
I ware, Cooking and J
r Heating Stoves, Fur-?
4niture, House Furn-4
F ishing Goods, Lamps 1
1 and Lamp Fixtures I
SADDLES, WAGON AND BUGGY HARNESS,
COLLARS, PADS, BLIND and RIDING BRIDLES.
?-THE SYRACUSE PLOW.
We guarantee they will please you better than any plow on the market.
We will sell you a first-class Sewing Machine for $20.00 and toe best in the
. world for $30.00, Guaranteed.
MOSS & GREEVER,
TAZEWELL, A.
TAZEWELL
COLLEGE
.FOR.
BOYS AND GIRLS.
Seventh Annual Session
Opens September 7,1897
.AND CLOSES.
MAY 18, 1898.
The Session just closed
was most satisfactory to
PUPILS, PATRONS AND IN?
STRUCTORS.
The enrollment this session exceeds thai
of any previous year?reaching 161, thus
giving logical endorsement to the natura
principle of co-education.
The college will be continued under tin
same management.
BOARD,ROOM,FUEL, LIGHTS
PER SESSION, $90.
Tuition, Literary Department - 30.0t
" Wnsie " - 30.0(
" ?? (in classes of two) each 20.0(
Twenty per et. discount on board if paic
monthly in advance.
You must bring with you one pair o:
[ sheets, blankets, towels and pillow cases.
Boys' boarding department in the col
lege building, under the direct supervisor
of the president.
Girls' boarding department near th<
college chapel with Mrs. J. N. Harman.
For further information apply to
A. A. FERGUSON, Principal,
Tazewell, Va,
0. T. PATTON,
BLACKSMITH
-AND
CENER?L - REPAIRER
TAZEWELL, VIRGINIA.
(Yost's Old Stand)
Iam prepared to execute, at s^orl
notice and on reasonable terms, al
classes of iron work?horse eh?eing, al
kinds of repairing, etc.
There is also connected with mv estab
lishment a WOOD-WORKING Depart
ment. under the control of J. B. Crawford,
where he is prepared to do everything per
taining to that branch.
W. W. MOORE & CO,
Tazewell, Va.,
Tin and Sheetiron
Workers
AND ROOFERS.
iQTGUTTKRING a specialty. All kinds
of Repairing done. Prices" reasonable and
WORK GUARANTEED. " 11-12,96,
J. B. CAUDILL,
TAZEWELL, YA
P
ha
m ?1
g
<
9
en
$200 STOCK OF
Hawkes' Spectacles
At H. W. POBSTS,
TAZEWELL, ? ? VIRGINIA
MRS, JENNIE LEWIS,
(Residence?West End)
Milliner and
Dressmaker,
TAZEWELL, VIRGINIA.
Perfect fit guaranteed in every case and
terms very reasonable.
ROBERT D. HUFFORD, H. D.,
pirySi?iai^ & (Surgeon
Will respond to all calls, day or night?
by telegram or otherwise. (aug27
E. H. Witten. J. H. Hibbitts.
WITTEN & HIBBITTS,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
GRUNDY VA.
Courses for Degrees, with Electees; high stand?
ard. Also Commercial and Preparatory Courses.
Library 20.000 volumes. Working Laboratory.
Good morals and discipline. Six churches?NO
BAR-ROOMS. Healthful mountain climate.
Vkry xgderate expenhek: may be reduced be?
low $150 for nine months ffecs, board, ic.) 45th
year begins Sept. loth. Catalogue free. Addrea
iUfHX D. Dkkiiek, President.
Clinch Valley Roller Mills.
CEDAR BLUFF, VA.,
The Best Equipped Mills in Southwest Virginia.
Manufactures High grade Roller Flour and all kinds of Mill Feed. Our "INVINCI?
BLE" brand of Fancy Patent Flour is pronounced the best in the maiket.
Our other celebrated brands are "LEADER," "XXXX FAMILY,"
"PRIDE OF THE VALLEY," and "RISING SUN." All our
flour guaranteed.
Capacity' 50 barrels Flour and 200 bushels Meal Daily.
Custom grinding carefully and promptly done. A customer who tries our Flour
and meal stays with us.
HIGGINBOTHAM & KIRBY, Proprietors.
MISS MAG. LITZ,
Milliner
DRESS MAKING
TAZEWELL, VIRGINIA,
(Residence - West Main Street.)
Thanking her numerous patrons for their past support,
[she hopes to merit a continuance of the same by good wor k at
reasonable prices. Promptness my motto.
Tazewell Planing Mills.
~~Q' W- [email protected]%& (2&, Proprietors.
We are now ready to do any kind of work in
RIPPING AND PLANING LUMBER,
MOULDINGS and BRACKETS
^^OF EVERY DESCRIPTION,
Window anel 'Qoor f-rame^. .
We take pleasure in announcing to the public that our
facilities for doing neat and clean-cut work and at short notice
are unsurpassed in this section of Virginia. If you doubt it
give us a trial and you will be convinced.
G. W. YOST & CO., Tazewell, Va.
F. B. Greenawali & Co.,
Dealers in and Manufacturers of
Marble and Granite
MONUMENTS-"TOMBSTONES
Iron Fencing and all kinds of Ceme
tary work done in the neatest style.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED, WYTHEYILLE, VIRGINIA.
? I ??I ?? L IUP?
Wauace Caldwelx, W. G. Yo?no,
Jno. L. Caldwell, Tazewell, Va.,
Jackson, Ohio,
CSLDWELL BROS. & YOUNG,
TAZEWELL, - - - VIKGINIA,
-DEALERS IN?
ITALIAN AND AMERICAN MARBLE,
GRANITE MONUMENTS
Statuary and all Kinds of Cemetery Work.
We are in the field on the merits of our work, and satisfaction is guaranteed, both
in quality and price. Specimens of our work can be seen in stock at the residence ?f
W. G. Young. Give us your orders, they will be promptly filled, and we will save
you money. For further information apply to
W. G. YOUNG,
Or T. M. HAWKINS, Sr.,
Traveling Agent
THE NEW YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE,
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