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Tazewell Republican. [volume] (Tazewell, Va.) 1892-1919, October 07, 1897, Image 2

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Tie Taze well Republican
rublished every Thursday at
TAZE WELL, VA.,
?w?
WILLIAM G. PENDLETON,
Editor and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTIONS.
Kcpablicnn, one year, rash in advance . . $ 1 00
Subscriptions on time. 1-60
?epublitan and N. Y. Tribune, one year, . 1 25
ADVERTISING RATES furnished on applica?
tion. Correspondence solicited.
The publishers of Tnic RirUBLICAX ire not re
-??v).-. for opinions expressed by Correspon?
dents.
The Rixcbijcan is entered at the Tost-office at
Tazewell. Virginia, as second-class matter.
For House of Delegates:
WILLIAM EL SPRATT.
For State Senate:
DR. ROBERT C. MEADE.
Till RSDAY, OCTOBER?, 1S97.
FALSE ISSUES.
If there is anything the Virginia Dem?
ocracy is successful at it is coming before
the people on false or dead iseues. Its
State platform for this year and the
speeches of its candidates for State offices
disclose the fact that this campaign is to
be made on questions that are essentially
national in their character, that do not re?
late to our internal affairs as a Common?
wealth.
In 1896 the Virginia Democracy con?
tended that the tariff question had noth?
ing to do with the Presidential election,
that it was a settled question and that the
free, unlimited coinage of silver was the
paramount issue. That poeition was
taken by the Democracy to attract atten?
tion from the disastrous tariff legislation of
the Democratic Congress. They knew
they could not stand before the people
and make any satisfactory defense of the
unsuccessful and destructive tariff legisla?
tion of the Democracy. Nothing w.ts left
them to do but jump upon the Populist
platform and unite with all the dissatisfied
and discordant elements that rallied to the
support of Mr. Bryan. This the Virginia
Democracy did with an earnestness that
almost approached sincerity. They did
not hesitate to abandon Mr. Cleveland anil
the platform upon which he wai elected
and advocate principles they had before
affected to despise.
Power and place is what the Virginia
Democracy craves, what it will have, even
if it has to be inconsistent and insincere.
In the national election last year the Bry
anites in Virginia insisted that the tariff
was a false issue, now they contend, in this
State election, that it is a vital one, if we
are to judge them by their platform and
the utterances of their stump orators.
This position is taken to attract the at?
tention of the voters from the questions of
honest election laws and a proper reform
in the administration of our State affaire.
The silver question and the tariff question
have nothing whatever to do with this
?lection. They are purely issues of a na
. tional character that were settled in a most
decide! w*y by the voters of the United
States in the national election of 1896.
That emphatic decision was fcr protection
and sound money. In the face of this de?
cree of the people, and the positive evi?
dence that is given by improved business
conditions that the Democratic position on
the money question was unsound, the Vir?
ginia Democracy insists upon making its
fight this year on the money and tariff
questions.
-???>
THE REPUBLICAN STATE TICKET.
We hare but scant news as yet from the
Republican convention which met at
Lynchburg on the 5th inet., in response to
the call of Col. Wm. Lamb, who claimed
to be chairman of the party in Virginia.
It is said that over eight hundred dele?
gates were present, and that harmony pre?
vailed in all the proceedings. Hon. Jacob
Yost, the Republican Congressman from
the tenth district, was permanent chair?
man of the convention.
The convention has placed before the
people of Virginia one of the best tickets
that we have known. While none of the
gentlemen who were nominated are men
of great ability, they are the equal in that, (
and in all other respects, of the candidates j
of the Democratic party. The Hon. P.
Q. McCaull was nominated for governor,
Gen. 0. B. Roller, of Rockingham county,
for lieutenant governor, and the Hon. Jas.
Lyons for attorney-general. They are
men of splendid character, excellent at?
tainments, true and tried Republicans and
will receive the votes of the great mass of
the Republican party in the State. The
Bowden-Brady faction can make no ap?
peals, sufficiently strong, to the rank and
file to prevent them from casting their
ballots on election day for McCaull, Roller
and Lyons. The ticket may be irregular,
but it is composed of 1\.-publicans and
worthy men, and Rep .ictus will and
should support it.
Mr.. James W. Smith announces him?
self an independent candidate for the
House of Delegates to represent Tazewell
county in the next General Assembly. He
states that he is for protection and a non
partisan election law. These are tempt?
ing baits thrown out to Republicans, but
they are not likely to bite, as it is well un?
derstood that Mr. Smith has become a
candidate at the instance of the Demo?
crats who were afraid to run one of their
own men, and suffer the defeat which is
? ure to come. Republicans in Tazewell
county will stand firm and united for
Spratt, who is a true and tried Republi?
can.
TiiK Democrats made a big fuss about
the low prices the farmers were receiving
for their products as a result of Demo?
cratic maladministration. Now they are
complaining that the necessaries of life
are too high for the good of the working
man. Cheap bread they say is what the
workingman should have. They talk one
way to the farmers and sing a different
song to the workingmen.
A citizen of Bluefield who has just re?
turned from a trip to Baltimore, Philadel?
phia and New York and who saw the great
evidences of prosperity on evei y hand
sayp: "I am a Democrat, but God bless
McKinley."?Bluefield Telegraph.
This is not the only Democrat in the
country who feels that way, but the most
of them are ashamed to owu it.
^ ? ?. ?
Tu a Democratic party is for the Walton
election law. Its candidates will not de?
clare otherwise. When you vote for a
Democratic candidate at the approaching
election you will cast your ballot for a man
who favors a law that is not fair and hon?
est.
There are many Democratic farmeis in
this section who are already reaping the
benefits that have followed a return of Re?
publican government. With secret de?
light they receive these favors, but curse
the hand that bestows them.
EvRora is pouring its gold into this
country for our products, and the miners
from the Klondike region are sending
their cold here to be coined, and the pros?
pect is that we will have flush gold times
in the United States.
RaruBi.iCASS should vote for no one but
a Republican in the approaching State
election. Vote for no man who is not in
favor of fait elections. No man who is for
the Walton law is in favor of fair elections.
.--*?*?
Mr. Bryam is trying to hide from the
' General" he was recently making enqui?
ries about. The "Geueral" is the last
man in the world Mr. Bryan desires to
meet.
Eves the Democrats ought to be glad
that Bryan was defeated, because they are
equal beneficiaries in the prosperity that
has come under a Republican administra?
tion.
Pneumatic Bhoes that make no sound
are said to be a recent invention. If the
principle could be applied to the agitators'
tongues it would be a good thing.
Cast your yote at the November elec?
tion for Meade and Spratt and an honest
election law.
Wee! Under Two Tariffs.
The Wool Record.]
The late financial panic that was felt so
palpably in financial circles, really bore
more heavily on the wool industry than on
any other. The price of wool declined
nearly 50 percent, between 1890and 1895.
In this period United States markets were
opened to the free importation of foreign
wools. Australia produced in 1857 30,
000,000 pounds; in 1893, 350,000,000, an
increase of 733 per cent. Argentina in
1857, 10,000,000 pounds; in 1893, 110,
000,000 pounds, an increase of 1,000 per
cent. The Cape of Good Hope produced
10,000,000 pound in 1857, and in 1893, 50,
000,000, an increase of 400 per cent. The
world's supply of wool now is six times as
great as in I860.
With American markets open to this
immense supply, the price of wool
must necessarily decline, but under the
restrictive tariff of 1890 importations of
woolen gao l were checked and the pi ice
of wool declined less in the United States
than elsewhere. The decrease in two yearB
in the importation of woolen goods was
equivalent to a decrease of 57,118,507
pounds of wool. This decrease in the sup?
ply of foreign wools increased the demand
for native wools. Thm a protective duty
onwools benefits the American wool-grower
in two ways at once: First, by enlarged
sales, and second, by better prices.
When in 1893 free wool was imminent,
the tide of woolen imports began to turn
until they increased from $19,219,034, in
1894, to f42,988,472 during the nine
months ending March 31, 1896. In 1894,
while awaiting tariff legislation, ibusiness
languished, until in 1895 tariff legislation
discriminating against the American wool
grower and manufacturer in foreign lands.
There were330,000,000pounds more wool,
raw and manufactured, imported for the
year ending Aug. 31, 1S95, than in the
year ending Aug. 31, 1894. American
wool growers were deprived of a marke
equal to this excess of importations, and
American prices declined. The wholesale
slaughter of unprofitable sheep was the
inevitable result of free wool.
The paramount law of supply and de?
mand can never be abrogated, but the
supply of home demand by native wools
can be fostered, and the monopoly of
American markets by foreign wools can be
prevented by such tariff legislation as the
bill of 1890, and that whose benefits we
now enjoy.
-??*?
Reciprocity and Frei Trade.
The Wool Record.]
Reciprocity is not free trade and con?
versely free trade is not reciprocity.
Free trade would open American ports
to all the nations of the world, without
discrimination or favor, discretion or
regulation, hence if all nations had all the
privileges of our markets and our trade,
tnere could be no further concession ex?
tended to friendly people seeking some
requital for privileges granted us. No bar
can be removed where no barriers exists.
A bird cannot fly without air to beat with
his wings. A fish can never swim unless
there be water to resist his exertions. No
victory can be won without a struggle. A
railroad pass would never be sought were
passage given without acharge, and so we,
as a nation, could hare no reciprocity
under free trade, as we would have re?
served no commercial privileges with
which to reciprocate, and no w ithheld con
concessions winch we could grant.
Protection and recirpocity open up a
different view. Protection throws a shel?
tering arm about the multiform industries
of our people. When a friendly nation
desnesthe benefits of our markets, she
offers similar privileges to our citizens, an
opening is made for her entrance a com?
mercial union is established, clamorous
competitors are restrained and mutual
prosperity ensues.
The single instance of Argentina proves
at once the baneful effects of so-called free
trade reciprocity. In 1S90 the export from
the United States to Argentina were $S,
322, and imports from Argentina $5,401,
C97, leaving the balance of trade in our
favor $2,920,930, while for the year ending
July 30. 1897, the exports were $6,384,
984, atid the imports $10,772,627, making
the balance of trade against us $4,387,643,
making a net decrease to our detriment of
$7,308,573.
Truly free trade is not reciprocity. Ar?
gentina' threatened tariff retaliation will
redound to her own disadvantage if such a
policy is executed.
The Result Proves the Act.
Cincinnati Commercial.]
Nobody who voted for McKinley has
beeu heard to complain during the last
sixty days of the result of that vote. Since
the enactment of the protective tariff,
which the election of McKinley assured,
manufacturers have resumed on full time,
with increased wages in many cases; busi?
ness houses report their sales larger than in
any year before McKinley times, and the
only complaint which the banks have to of?
fer is that they can not find enough custo?
mers for the money which they have to loan.
This is in marked contrast with the condi?
tions in the corresponding period of Cleve?
land's administration, when banks were
breaking.businees bouses closing.aud man?
ufacturers reducing forces or suspending
operations altogether.
Chief Ignacco, of the Southern Utes, the
last of the noted Colorado Indian chiefs, is
to attend the festival of Mountain and
Plain, to be held soon in Denver.
Governor Taylor, of Tennessee, in a
speech on "Irish Day," at
the exposition, said: "If I were a sculp?
tor, I would chisel from the marble my
idea of a hero. I would make it the figure
of an Irishman, sacrificing his hopes and
his life on the altar of bis country, and I
woulk carve on its pedestal the name of
Emmet."
Major William D. Smith, second in com?
mand of the body-guard of General Go?
mez, is now in Chicago, and said recently
in reference to the report from the Consul
at Cienfuegos, that that part of the it-land
was pacified: "I have engaged in forty
two pitched battles with General Gomez
before I left Cuba, and some of the worst
battles that I have been in have been
fought within a short distance of Cienfue?
gos, and the consul there could not have
avoided knowing it. On May 2, when I
left the island, there were at least in the
Province of Santa Clara, centering about
Cienfuegos, 12,000 Cubans fully armed
and equipped."
No Gripe
When you take Hood's Pills. The big, old-fash?
ioned, sugar-coated pills, which tear you aU to
pieces, are not la it with Hood's. Easy to take
oods
ad easy to operate, is true
?1 Hood's Pills, which are
;p to date in every respect
lafe, certain and sure. AH
Irugfeists. 25c. C. I. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass.
The only Pills to take with Hood's Sarsaparilla.
Inducements
On the Klondike
In the Gold Fields of Alaska.
Never in the history of
America were there greater in?
ducement for a young man to
grow rich as in the gold fields
of Alaska. People are flock?
ing there by the hundreds.
But why go to Alaska when
the facility for growing rich is
right in your midst. Young
men, old men, be up and doing,
work hard right at home and
spend your money at home.
With your wages help your
home merchant to make
money, he will help the far?
mer and the farmer will help
some one else. In your invest?
ments go where you get the
best value for the least money.
Of course if you do this you
will come to us when you are
in need of Drugs, Medicines,
Etc.
We are better prepared to
do business now than ever be?
fore. Our immense stock of
Stationery and School Supplies
are coming in rapid. Just
what you need in Tablets, Com?
position Books, Pencils, Pen?
holders. Get a penny Sponge
for your slate; its just as good
as the 5c ones you vget else?
where.
Our line of Perfumes, Nail
Brushes, Tooth Brushes, Hair
Brushes, Combs, fine and
coarse, and toilet requests are
always complete.
We fill prescriptions day or
night, always using the best
ingredients that money can
buy. Don't go to the Klon?
dike, stay at home and buy
your drugs and medicines from {
us, and make money by saving
it on your purchases.
Yours to serv
TAZEWELL DRUG 60.
?
G. H. LANDON, Mgr.
CHAPMAN & HURT,
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS,
TAZEWELL, VIRGINIA,
Represent the following old reliable Fire Companies:
Liverpool BndL ondon and Globe,
Hamburg-Bremen,
Royal Insurunce Company of Liverpool,
Hartford Fire Insurance Company,
New York Underwriters' Agency,
Home Insurance Company of New York,
Aetna Insurance Co. of Hartford.
Georgia Home Ins. Co. of Colnmbus, Ga.
Virginia Fire and Marine Insurance Co.
Virginia State Insurance Company,
Petersburg Savings and Insurance Co.
United States Insurance Co. of N. Y.
North British and Mercantile.
LIFE AND ACCIDENT.
Mutual Life of New York,
Travelera' Ins. Co. of Hartford Conn.
American Security Company of N. Y.
Lloyd's Plate Glass Company of N. Y.
Policies "written by them insure protection, indemnity and security
to their holders. Losses paid in Southwest Virginia over $35,000.00,
every dollar of which was paid without law-suit or controversy. octl
CASTNER & CURRAN,
Genera! AgentsTorthe
Celebrated
Pocahontas
Smokeless
Semi-Bituminous
COAL
Main Office: 328 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.
BRANCH OFFICES:
1 Broadway, New York, Old Colony Building, Chicago, III.
70 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass., Neave Building, Cincinnati, O.
Progress Building, NorfUk, Va., 4 Fenchurch Avenue, London, England,
Terry Building, Roanoke, Va.
POBST &WINGO,
China and Glassware;
Me You Examined Our Stock and Prices?
We have fine Carlsbad and Haviland Dinner and
Tea Sets, handsomely decorated and of elegant de?
signs. China Dessert Sets, Berry Sets in China or
glass, After-dinner and Individual Coffee Sets, beau?
tiful China Statuettes and Vases, Jardinears, Cake
Baskets and, in fact, the most complete line of China
and Queensware ever seen in this section. We have
Glass Tumblers in great quantities, fine and cheap.
Flower Pots all sizes.
Baseball Goods and Fishing Tackle.
We have a complete stock of Baseball Goods and
Fishing Tackle.
The best Cigars, Chewing and Smoking Tobacco.
Fruit Jars.
200 dozen Fruit Jars, one-half gallons and quarts.
Lower prices than ever.
POBST &, WINGO,
Pobst Building, Tazewe I, Va.
<XXXXX> <><xxxx>oo OOOOOOOO CO
Fishing Tackle.
Have just received a Car Load of Earthen
and Stone Ware, the finest quality. Ves?
sels from one-half gallon to six gallons in
size.
We have a nice stock of Fishing Tackle
?jointed rods, reels, grass and linen lines,
hooks, with and without snoods.
pRUIT JARS.
We have a large quantity of Fruit Jars, all
sizes, which we are selling at bottom prices.
All kinds of Staple and Fancy Groceries.
PEERY & DODD.
OO O?OOOO OOCO 00?
T
t.
All kinds of Hard- ]
i ware, Cooking and I
\Heating Stoves, Fur-*
niture, House Furn-^
ishing Goods, Lamps 1
and Xiamp Fixtures /
SADDLES, WAGON AND BUGGY HARNESS,
COLLARS, PADS, BLIND and RIDING BRIDLES.
??THE SYRACUSE PLOW.
We guarantee they will please you better than any plow on the market.
Ie will sell you a first-class Sewing Machine for $20.00 and the best In the
world for $30.00, Guaranteed.
MOSS & GREEVER,
TAZEWELL, VA.
TAZEWELL
.FOB.
BOYS AND GS RLS.
Seventh Annual Session
Opens September 7, 1897
.AND CLOSES.
MAY 18, 1898.
The Session ju?t closed
was most sat isfact ory to
P?PILS, PATRONS AHO IN
The enrollment this session exceeds that
of any previous ye-tr?reaching 101, thus
giving logical endorsement to the natural
principle of co-education.
The college will be continued under the
same management.
BO ARD, ROOM, FUEL, LIGHTS
PER SESSION, $20.
Tuition, Literary Department - 30.00
" Music '? - 30.00
" " (in classes of two) each 20.00
Twenty per ct. discount on board if paid
monthly in advance.
You must bring with you one pair ol
sheets, blanketp, towels and pillow cases.
Boys' boarding department in the col?
lege building, under the direct supervision
of the president.
Girls' boarding department near the
college chapel with Mrs. J. N. ilarman.
For further information apply lo
A. A. FERGUSON, Principal,
Tazewell, Va.
J. B. CAUDILL,
TAZEWELL. YA
E. H. Witten. J II. IIibbitts.
WITTEN &. HIBBITTS,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Gil UND Y VA.
W. I. MOORE ? CO,
Tazewell, Va?
Tin and Sheetiron
Workers
AND ROOFERS.
{??"GUTTERING a specialty. All kinds
ol Repairing done. Prices reasonable and
WORK GUARANTEED. " 11-12,96.
DR. M. B. CROCKETT,
Physician and Surgeon
Has located at Liberty Ilill (Knob), Va
at which place he can be found at ail
times except when absent en professional
duties. N
ROBERT D. HUFFORD, M. D.,
TAZEWELL^ VA.
Will respond to all calls, day or night?
by telegram or otherwise. (aug27
C. T. PATTON,
BLACKSMITH
-and
CENERAL - REPAIRER
TAZEWELL, VIBGINIA.
(Yost's Old Stand)
Iam prepared to execute, at SjjOrt
notice and on reasonable terms, ah1
classes of iron work?horse shoeing, all
kinds of repairing, etc.
There is also connected with my estab?
lishment a WOOD-WOK KING Depart?
ment, under the control of J. B. Crawford,
where he is prepared to do everything per?
taining to that branch.
$200 STOCK OF
Hawkes' Spectacles
At H. W. POBST'S,
TAZEWELL, ? ? VIRGINIA
MRS, JENNIE LEWIS,
(Residence?West End)
Milliner and
Dressmaker,
TAZEWELL, VIRGINIA.
Perfect fit guaranteed in every case and
terms very reasonable.
COLLEGE,
Salem, Va.
Courses for Degrees, with Electlves; high stand?
ard. Also Commercial and I'repanitorv Courses.
Library 20.000 volumes. Working Laboratory.
Good morali and discipline. Six churches?NO
BAR-ROOMS. Healthful mountain climate.
Vekv moderate expenses: may be rc'.uced be?
low S150 for nine mouths (fees, board, &c.) 45th
fear begins Sept. 15th. Catalogue free. Addrca
Jcuvs D. rjiiEHEE, President.
Clinch Valley Roller ills.
CEDAR BLUFF, VA.,
The Best Equipped Mills in Southwest Virginia.
Manufactures High grade Roller Flour and all kinde of Mill Feed. Our "IN V :>CI
RLE" brand of Fancy Patent Flour is pronounced the beet in th<> market.
Our other celebrated brands are "LEADER," "XXXX FAMILY,"
"PRIDE OF THE VALLEY," and "RISING SUN." All our
flour guaranteed.
Capacity' 50 barrels Flour and 200 bushel* Meal Dally
Custom grinding carefully and promptly done. A customer r bo tries our Floi
and meal stays with us.
HIGGINBOTHAM & KIRBY, Proprietors.
MISS MAG. LITZ,
Milliner
DJRJESS MAKING
TAZEWELL, VIRGIN A,
(Residence - West Main Stre^i.)
Thanking her numerous patrons for their j>ast support,
she hopes to merit a continuance of the same by good work at
reasonable prices. Promptness my motto.
Tazewell Planing Mills.
IX). ^<35^ &(S?., Proprietors.
We are now ready to do any kind of work in
RIPPING AND PLANING LUMBER,
MOULDINGS and BRACKETS
~*~~~0F EVERY DESCRIPTION
Window and lS)oor praraej.
We take pleasure in announcing to the public that our
facilities for doing neat and clean-cut work and at short notica
are unsurpassed in this section of Virginia. ] f you doubt it
give us a trial and you will be convinced.
G. W. YOST & CO.. Tazewell, Va.
eenawalt & Go,,
Dealers in and Manufacturers of
Marble and Granite
-TOMBS-TONES
Iron Fencing and all kinds of Ceme
tary work done in the neatest style.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. WYTHEVILLE. VIRGINIA.
Wallace Caldwell, W. G. Yocjco,
Jno. L. Caldwell, Tazewell. Vs.
Jackson, Ohio,
CALDWELL BROS. & YOUNG.
TAZEWELL, - - - VIKG1NIA,
?DEALERS IN?
ITALIAN AND AMERICAN MARBLE,
GRANITE MONUMENTS
Statuary and all Kinds of Cemetery Work.
We are m the field on the merits of our work, and satisfaction is guaranteed, both
in quality and price. Specimens of our work can be seen hi stock at the residence si
W. G. Young. Give us your orders, they will be promptly filled, and we will bst*
you money. For further information apply to ,
W. G. YOUNG,
Or T. M. HAWKINS, Sr.,
Traveling Agent
NEW YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE,
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