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Virginia citizen. (Irvington, Va.) 1891-1921, November 11, 1910, Image 1

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irgittia
J^imuAjggd to the laterests of Laocaslet Coanty in Particular; the Horthcra Necfc and Rappahaanocl Valley ia Geaeral, and the World at large.
VOLUMB XX.
IRVINGTON, VIRGINIA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1910.
Nttmrito (\.
CHARLES M* STRUVEN & CO.,
8TEAM8HIP. FACTORY
AND
MIACHINI8T8' 8UPPLIE8.
WHOLKSALE
GROCEKS AND SHIF CHANDLERS.
BROKERS AND CORMlVtlON HERCIIANTS FOR
MENHADEN FI8H 8CRAP AND FI8H OIL.
114 Frederlck St., BALTIMORE, ML>.
PAID UP CAPITAl, $108,000.00.
NORFOLK BUILDING SUPPLIES CORP.,
SUCCESS0RS T0
FRANE T. CLARK C0., Ltd.,
(A ParLnership Association Expiring December 31st, 1909.)
COOKE, CLARK CO., & LUTHER SHELD0N.
ESTABLISHED 1870.
Thero are six reasons why BUILDERS and OWNERS should buy their
Saah. Doors, Blinds, Builder's Hardware, Mantels,
Tiles, Grates, Paints, Oile, Glass, Etc, from
THE NORFOLK BUILDING SUPPLIES CORPORATION.
THE REASONS:
1. We contract no bad debta.
2. We are the cheapest buyers.
8. Our expensea are minimized.
4. Our facilities are the greatest.
5. Our or^anization is unrivallcd.
6. Our protits are small.
NORFOLK BUILDINi SUPPLIES CORPORATION,
9IMI8 HIUMIKK AVKNUK. "pafiH.POT Tf VA
Un-97 TAZKWFbL HT. iNV*wEV4?Aa V A.
THE HAWKS-MAUP1N C0.,
SASH, MANTEL.S, PAINTS. BUILDING,
DOORS, TILING, OJLS, PAPERS,
BLINDS, GRATES, GLASS, VARNISHES,
MOULDINGS, BRACKETS, ETC.
7IS-7I7 CRAWFORD Sy PORTSMOUTH, VA,
CLARK SASH & D00R CORPORATION,
Frank T. Clark, President,
MANUFACTURERS, J0S3ERS AND DEALERS IN
Sash, Doors, Blinds, Builders' Hardware,
Porch Columns and Stair Work,
Paints, Oils and Varnishes,
Plate and Window Glass.
NORFOLK, - VIRGINIA.
MACHINE SHOP AND RAILWAY.
J. WOOD TULL, Managkr.
The new Railway and Machine
Shop on Carter's Creek, fltted with
Drill Press, Turning Lathes, Sbap, Band Saw and Planer,
Is now prepared to do all kinds of
MACHINERY REPAIR1NG AND ADJUST1NG.
All sizes of Pipe and Pipe Fitting on hand.
Boats Hauled, Built, Rebuilt or Repaired.
MACHINE SHOP & RAILWAY GO.,
(HE R FISH FACTORY ) IRVINGTON, VA.
UQNUMENTS AND GRAVESTGNiS
IN MAKBLK \ N|l ORAN1TE.
We pay freight and guarantee safe delivery.
As we employ no Canvassers or Agenta no commissiona inuat
be added to our prices, therefore we can use first claas material
and linish it right.
LARtiEST STO< K IN THE SOUTU.
When in Norfolk eall on ua. Yoa will And what you want: are and
V -ow what you are buying- and can ??t it quickly.
THKCOUPRK MAItlILK WOKKH,
(Eatabliahed 62 Yamra)
lfttt to 103 Raik St., Norfolk Va.
B. H. BAIRD,
CENERAL FIRE INSURANCE.
Fusr?Fi>if-E and phonb- WAR8AW, VIRGINIA
Representing Companiea having combined
assets of over # 1 1 ,000,000.
HAUBURU RREMEN FIRE INSURANCE CO., llamhnrr. Uernianj
VIROINIA E1RE * MARINE INSURANCE CO- Kiehaioad, Va
SFRlNtiFIELD FIRE & HARINE INSURANCE CO., Sprlngfleld, tfass'
VIROINIA STATE INSURANCE CO., Hlehn.oud. Va
THE GREAT POLICY-HOLDERS' CO.
7 1- Why ie It that tbe Union Centra), while Us preminmi ara low.can nav
the largesl dmdends?
l?t Becnuse the company ta cholce lu ae'ectlng Its rlaka. Conaeqnence: &
low death rate.
9nd. Becanac for twreuty years ll haa realtsad the hlgheet tntereat rate.
?J_8. Wllh whai reanltf
a We furnlsh maiimom Inanrance at miolmum coat.
Before taking Llfe Inanrance wrlte for rataa In the great Poltcy-holder
Company
(C. P. PALMFR and R II NORRIS, Kilmarnock, Va.
Agenclei: { A. C. BALL, Molnak, Va.
I M 8. RTRINOPELLOW, Brandy, Va.
THECREAMOFTHENEWS.
Tlmt's wlmt ivmlera #**t in thf*
?>VIRGINIA CITIZEN*^
LoORa, County, Stnt?\ Ntitional and
Foreign?all aimniered duwii.
CALL OF THE SEA.
Oh the call of the sea for me;
Oh the lure of the vaaty deep;
For I'm its wild deapairing child
That have wandered afar from ita
waters wild,
Yet sigh for the blue wave's leap.
Oh the call of the sea for me;
Oh the charm of the rolling wave;
Sweet, sweet could I rest on thy throb
bing breast.
That paaaionately moving knows not
rest,
Or whether at peace or whether foam
crest,
There is granduer in thy lave.
IlKNKY WlRT HOLLOWAY.
New York, N. Y.
ANTI-SALOON RALLY.
Portions of Rev. Ed. J. Richard
son's Address.
In part, the speaker said: "It will
be, perhaps, new to many of you today
to know just how the present license
system of the liquor traftic was estab
lished. It waa during the bloody days
of the sixties when Congress passed a
law, evidently at the behest of the
allied liquor interests, to put a tax on
liquor for the alleged purpose of raising
revenue to defray the expensea of the
war. But really it was to have gov
araaieaa protection of the liquor traffic
and put the manufacture of liquor es
pecially in the hands of the few ?a
truat. This bill IVesident Lincoln re
fused to siffn until he was assured that
it would aimply aerve as a revenue
measure till the cloae of the war and
then be repealed. Mr. Lincoln was op
posed to the mensnre on Ihe grouud
that it wouM faafpn iqw>n the people a
worac alavi i \ Iftwa il.r l.lack alavery
then in qui^-'i' ??>. ni.il it vsae only when
the promiao row-ir.d to was made Uiat
he agreed to rian >lu- bili and make ita
law. It ia suriicicnt to say that the
promise to Mr. Lincoln was never kept.
Thua by direct federal legialation the
liquor traftic was faatened upon the
people; the statea, one by one, then
took up the matter and went into part
nership with the most infamous traftic
ev??r fasti nr.l upon d people without
the .'onsent of the governed.
?l-'v?.*?lly. we have the ri^ht to de
mand thut as the General Assembly
und Congrt'go naaetaa1 lawa to put the
liquor trulfic whete it \* fliose bodiea
should aettle the matlei ; but the tem
prmnce people are much fairer to the
liquor forv?>s than they were to the
people when w .? Htand for a hubmission
of the questiou to a vote of the people
of thia State ao far bf it < oncerna Vir?
ginia?and the Supreme ? ourt of the
Uniled Statea haa decided ilmt "atate
wide prohibition" is conatitu; u.nal, and
the Conatilution of Virginia (aection
62) also provides for it.
"But it is objected that as local op
tion is a democratic meaaure no one
community has a right to aay what
another community ahall do with refer
ence to the liquor question?that each
community ahould settle the question
for itself. Now, I wish to say (point
ing to the hust of Thomas Jefferson in
the court houae) that I atand with the
great statesman, Jefferson, in the
opinion t!*nt povernnv-nt shoukl be of
the penple ainl loi Llit jteople and by
the people. It occurs to me, however,
that from the liquor folks' standpoint,
it is to be a government of Uie liquor
folk, for the liquor folk and by the
liquor folk, for the liquor interests are
never aatisfied until they get absolute
control of every agency they can to
promote and protect them in their work
of destroying humanity. No one stands
more for real local self-government
than I, but the liquor traftic is not local
in its effects and resulta?it cannot be
localized. We got our present local op
tion law in 1884-85, first by the endorse
ment of the republicans and then by
the democrata in their respective con
ventions and by an act of the legiala
ture after a monster petition contain
ing the names of over 70,000 voters
had been rolled into the State Capitol
in a wheelbarrow. Mr. Geo. W. Hawx
hurst, of my town, Falla Church, who
waa Grand Secretary of the Good Temp
lars, and who helped very largely in
the shaping and direction of the bill has
given me the details of the great tight.
I'erhaps it ia almost useiess to say
that the liquor folk did all in their
power to defeat the bill.
"I repeat, "the liquor traftic cannot
be localized. Now, I grant that in a
purely local matter no other community
haa a right to meddle with another, as,
for example, in waterworka propositiona
or bonds for other impovements. These
are mattera peculiarly and definitely
local. But the trouble with liquor is
that it doea not remain local. The rev
enue derived from it accrues to the
community in which it is sold, but the
communities where it ia eonsumed?
most of them in Virginia are 'dry'?
have to bear the burden of ruined
homes, blighted lives and criminal ex
penaes. Hence, as ia our right, we are
stanoing for a submission of the ques
tion of liquor or no liquor to a vote of
the people. Our people are becoming
weary of the peisistent efforts of the
liquor interests to re-open saloons in
communitiea from which they have been
driven and where the conditions are so
much better than before. The recent
large majoritiea in re-aftirming local
uption in Wincheater and Fredricka
burg are evtdencea of how the people
generally atand on thia queation; and
out of about fifty contesta in the nine
years of the l^eague's history we have
loat only three places back to the liquor
traftic. Moreover, 66 of the 100 coun
ties are 'dry' and 85 are without saloons.
Of 161 towna 140 are 'dry', and half the
citiea. Of our two million people in
Virguua at laaat 1,600,000 are hving ia
'dry' tcrritory. Nine years ago there
were 1718 aaloons in the State; now 702.
Then there were 641 distilleriea; now
68. Then taere were 2,691 licensea of
all sorts; now 908. And, by the way,
if the hoats of Methodists, Baptiats,
Presbyterians, Episcopalians, Luther
ana, Disciplea, etc., can't put out 908
liquor ahops from Virginia they had
better lock their church doors, throw
away the keys, get out of business and
blow up their buildings wiUi dynaroite.
"Tbe most serious probtem that our
people face in the present attitude of
the liquor question is the invasion of
our State by national liquor interests
and the nullification of our million dol
lar constitution. In town after town,
city after city, representatives of na?
tional liquor dealers' association have
appeared and attempted to hold or
helped to hold the liquor traffic-not
for the benefit of the community but
to make our Virginia communities de
pots of suppliea of outaide liquor and to
fill the pockets of millionaire brewers
and distillers with our hard-earned Vir
Jfinia money. The shameful manner in
which our constitution has been nulli
fied in the registration of venal whites
and negroes is not generally known to
the people?eapecially in the registra-'
tion of negroes. No one desires that
any negro who has the moral right to
register under Uie constitution shall
not have that right secured to him, and
I have talked with republicans and dero-1
ocrats of prominence in this State and
have yet to find a true, patriotic Vir
ginian?whether democrat or repub'i
can?who wants the bad negro re-en
franchiaed. But the .liquor forcea are
putting such negroea back on the poll
books. A few tigures will give some
idea of what ia being done. In Berry
ville, in ordinary elections 4 negroes
were registered; ten daya after a cer
tain primary, when a liquor election
waa held, 52 were qualified to vote. In
Staunton the registration of negroes
waa increaaed from 4 to 72; Harrison
burg, from 24 to 85; Koanoke, from
about 75 to 300. In some places schools
have been run by white men who taught
negroea how to write a copy of applica
tion for registration, thus drilling tliem
for registration and then had them reg
istrated. The Anti-Saloon League is
consistently advising ita people against
the registration of negroes and as an
example of how we stand on this ques
tion let me aay that when the 'drys'
knew they would call Uie election in
Fredricksburg about two years ago 31
negroes were on the poll books; in the
election recently called by the 'weta'
when they knew they would call it
nearly 90 negroes were registered.
"Y?t there are thoae who atill hold
that one community should not say
whether or not liquor ahould be aold
therein ? to let each community settle
the queation for itself. But, aa I have
aaid. >oo cannot localize liquor; and an
exumple or the logical right of a com?
munity pulTering from liquor to say
wleMher the ohVnding community sel
liiur liquor ?hould sell it, I wish to say
h'v : Not lope ap,o a Wytheville man
aaid: *1 hold that as long as Koanoke
haa a right to ship a jug of liquor to
'dry' Wytheville, Wytheville has a right
to send a vote to Koanoke. And a
apeaker commenting upon this says:
'May the Lord deliver us from the day
when a good 'dry' man's vote can't go
as far aa a liquor man's jug!"
Shall Wonien Vote?
If they did. milliona would vote Dr. King**a New
1 .if e Pilla the true retnedy for wonien. For banish
inarduli. fairsed feelinjra. backache or headache.
constipation. dlapellins: colda, impartinjr appetite
and toninc up the ayatem, they're uneu.ual?i.
Gaay, aafe, aure. 26c. at all druRiriata.
Ptantation Praaching.
Among the qualnt aud true atorlea
which Marlon Harland has told In her
autobiography ls an lustauee of plun
tarJon preaching. 'Two young men,
acqualntancea of Marlon Harland, hap
pened to be present at a funeral serv
ice held tn a negro cemetery. The cof
fln, repoalng beslde the grave. w|8 ua
usually amall?In fact. the witnesses
agreed that they had never bebeld a
smaller. Inapired by the prcsence of
the two vlsltors, the preueher eontin
ued his diacourae with extra vigor.
"Even de distlnguished lives of de two
'lustr'ous strangers what has honored
us by comin' among us dls bleased
arternoon to J'ine lu our mo'nin'?what
Ia they? And what are we? And
what ls man bo'n o' woman. my bretb
ren? Up terday wld de hoppergrasa
and dowu termorrow wld de aparrer
graas! Luke de fiower ob de cornflel',
so he spreads hisself. llke a tree plant
ed by de horae brauch. Den de win'
rises. and de tempes' blows and beata
upon dat man, and wbar ls he?"
Pauslng ln mldeareer. the preacher
touched the pathetleally tidleuloua box
with a dlsdalnful foot. "As fur dls
t'ing." rlslng on his toes ln the energy
of his contempt?"as fur dls 'ere ltum
?put de t'ing ln de grouu'! It's too
amall fer to be argylu' over!"
Nerva.
Sbe (with an ldea of ehoklng htm
ofT)?There are only two men ln tha
world I could love. He? Indeed! And
who Ia the other one?
Againat His Convictione.
"Have aome of this Welsh rabblt.
Bjonaon?" aaked BJones aa be stirred
the golden concoction in the chaflng
dlah.
"No. thaaka. BJonesay." returned
RJonson, pattlng his stoinach tenderly.
"I am unalterably opposed to all cor?
poration taxee."?Harper'a Weekly.
Off Again.
MI met your huaband In town. Ha
was very much elated"?
"Tbe villatn! He told me he would
never take anotber drop."?Houaton
Poat.
He who would do a great thing well
muat nrat huve done tbe aluiplaat thing
peifeetly.?Cady.
SAVOR AND SALT.
Grant me the savor and salt of life,
To love and to work ? that's al!!
My strong hand bent to some noble strife
That has Right for its battle-cal).
My strong heart spent in the daily love
That can freely take and give
One with the flesh, and with God above,
That a race may be born and live.
-Life.
AN OLD TIME WEDD1NG.
I Anent the Phillips-Gaines nuptials a
fortnight ago, in Esaex county, we cllp
the following from an account of it in
The Tidewater Democrat:
"The 'old-time' colored people will
soon live but in legend and in brief
written history, but to me they are
ever a source of interest, and the uni
que way in which they tell a story, is
often as graphic as it is free of gram
matical correctneaa But the thought is
the very essence of description, and no
grammar, and no dictionary, and rhet
oric and no praxis will make a weak
thought a strong one, nor paint a poor
thought a pretty one.
Let's try to follow without notes
the account this old colored man gave
of this beautiful marriage. See if he
did not draw the picture of what went
on, and the picture is the sum and sub
stance of all descriptive writing:
"Yes, sar, I seen it from start to fin
ish. Ebry bit ob it, and ebry word ob
it. De old lady and myself has been
gwine tode mar'gis ebber since we could
'member. You see I knowsdese young
folks. I kinder feels an intrust in dem. 1
knowed Mars. Josh Roan jest as wellas
I does you. He was dis here lady's
grand-pa. And her ma, she wbb named
Miss Lula Roone, you see. Den she
married a Gaines. And her grand-ma
was a sister to Dr. Chris Newbill and
Dr. Willie Newbill and all of dem. Now
you see how 'twas. Dat's how Mr.
Frank Newbill ob Caurters crick was
dare, and Miss Kit Newbill ob
Norfolk and all de Streets, and de
Newbills who was dere. Den 1 ben
knowing de Phiilips fambly all ob my
life. I knoweddis hereMister Hugene's
grand-pa and his grand-ma too. She
was a Clarkson, Mars' John Clarkson's
siater; and his ma too 'fore she was
married; she waB a JefTeriea fromb 'cross
de ribber. And as to his pa, I couldn't
help knowing him, case 1 almost fotch
ed him up.
"So I aays 1 waa gwine to dat marige
whether or no. And I went. Well,
sar, when I got up dat galry, de church
waa in a blaze, and broad day time too
outside. Why, honey, aays 1 to myself,
if dey ain't gone and turned de berry
day into night here at 12 ob 'clock.
Oare was sebenty-five candles all burn
ing at onct, and de pulpit was likc de
vvoods at night, for dey had gone down
into de dcptha of de foresta an' hauled
de ebber grevns and sot dem up dare
behind candles. And I was actting
dare athinking 'bout what it all ment.
and how it secmsd jest day 'fore yis
tiddy dat Mr. Ilugene was a curly
headed baby.
"All at onct fromb de corner in de
church dey struck up a chune on de or
gin dat waa de solemest chune dat I
ebber did hear. It kinder kotched me
up wid it and carried me 'long wid it
floating out some whar or nuther, I
didn't kere whar. I jest shot my eyea
and went 'long. I aaw purty sights
and sad sights all mixed up; and I aaw
purty littleangelsund sad looking chillen
running 'long 'gether; anddere waslubly
houses jeat lilled wid fine ladies and
gemmen, and de. tables jest a breaking
down wid de food for dem to eat.
but on the outaide dere waa dose little
angels and dose littie aad looking child?
ren a trying to git in de house as if dey
was hungry.
"You could hear de water running
'long de stream, and de very flowers
aeemed to grow as de music went float
ing 'long by dem. Says I to myself,
'jest hesh our mouf! I don't kere
where dey goes. I gwine to follow dis
day.' Up de hill sides and down de val
leys de went. doae little chillun and de
angels wid dem. Presently seems dat
de little chillun got used to de angels
and 'gan to laf wid 'em, and play and
skip and all dat. 'Hallelujah!' says I,
and 'bout dat time de ,old 'oman ahe
koched me by de shoulder, and says,
*Wy don't you wake up Bob?' *I ain't
aleep, Nancy, but I is jest a dreaming
in de day time.' Den de music atopped.
And de gemmen pranced 'round de pul
pit to see de lights was all right. Den
de orgin struck up a difFunt chune. Dis
was loud like'wen de soldiers march by.
'Hesh your mouf' aaya I, 'for nowj dey
is a coming sure.' Dere was a gemrnan
marching on one side and a lady march
ing on de oder side. Here dey come,
jest as slow and as quiet as if dey had
all ob de day before dem. Den here
come another couple and another, tell de
pulpit flatform (negroes never say
'platform') waa jest libe wid 'em. And
here come de lady herself wid Mars'
Jack Roone, and Mr. Hugene wid his
brother Syd. Dey all had de headest
'zanthemums pinned on 'em dat ebber
I did see, and de lilly ob de valley dat
blooma in de spring time waa a bloom
ing in de fall ob de year! Dey was
; flowera, dey was! Den de music hushed
I up so you could hardly hear it, and
' brother Bradley, he began his ceremony.
Dis was solemn, sure. All dem flowers
and dose candles a burning. and dose
ladies all dreased like dey was going to
be married demselves.
"Dat was a purty sight fore de
. world. I heard de preacher ask her if
she would obey, and she aaid she would.
And den I touched Nancy. And she
drew up kinder stiff like. and got fur
der from me. I saw 'em when de ring
; was put on, and I hurd ebry t ing dat
was said. And when de preacher
? 'nounced de benadiction, day all turnad
r>und and moved out. Dis time Mr.
Hugene had his bride. And Mars'Jack
Roone he had some udder lady wid him,
cause he had done gib up Miss Lillie to
Mr. Hugene at de altar. Dey marched
on out and de music kept on playingand
dare I sot tell de last one was out.
"When I got down Nancy had gone
home. But Mars' Wilton Phillipsjhe
was dare, and he said, 'corae on over to
dj house. old man, and git your dinner.'
Went? ob course I went. I stayed out
side tell dey called me, and being dert
was no one else in de room to eat,
cause de white folks had finished. I had
de room to myself. So dey put me at
a side table and filled up two plates,
one ob sweet things and ob 'stantials.
and fotched dem ober dare to me. All
I could say waa, 'De Lord bo praisod!'
Dat was a dinner like dey used to hab
when I waa a boy. Dere waa ebry
t'ing dare to eat dat de mouf ob man
could ask for. But, sar, I finished dem
two plates; and 'fore I could git outen
le house dey had done fixed up some
for de old woman, and some ob de gcm
men gave me a cigar. and den 1 went
home rejoicing. So you see I saw it all
from start to finish, and 'twas de finest
marriage, and de greatest dinner I'a
seen sinee de war."
And the old colored man pretty near
?y had it right in the judgment of
many others.
8aves hii lown Man** Life.
Tho very arave neemed to yawu beforo Kclwrl
Madsen. of West Burling-ton. Iowa. when, aftrr
trvrrt week* in th? honpital. four of the beat ph>
xiciana irav? him up. Then waa ahnwn the mar
ve!ou? curativa poww of Kleetric Bittcr*. For.
after eiarht months of friahtful HuflVrinir fi..m
liver troubleand yellow jaundice. Rrttinsr no h.lp
from other remnliea or doctora. five bottlea of thi:?
matrhlcna medicine eomplctrly cur.^1 him. Iti
poaitively auaranteed for Stomach. I.irer or Ki?l
ney Lroublea and never diaappointa. Only 50c. at
all drua~a~iHta.
GREAT SALT LAKE.
An Immtnti Fra.h Watar Sea Somi
Thousanda of Years Ago.
In gluehii tlmes Qraat Salt luke was
i BaaarwItcaMl rraati watar laka law ataa
of I^iko lluroii?that is, about 18,000
aquare inlles nnd had Its outlet Into
tlie Port Neuf. the Snake aud the Co
lutnbla rivors. This was nt least 10.000
years ngo, but sinee that time the cll
BMta has baaaaaa adi, and not aaaaga
water has fallen over the (Irent basln
io supply that lost hy evni>oratlon.
Cousequently the lake has censed to
flow froiu Its outlet and ^nulually drled
up froiu over a thousnnd feet <leep to
firteen feet nnd from 18.O00 square
inlles ln nrea to less lhan 1,700.
It ls now Keventy inlles long nnd
about thlrty wlde. but ls beiuitlfnl
still and ls the home of tnyriads q|
sea blrds :uul other waterfowl. It ls
tbe ajaaat iwaati af the paaplt <>r rtnh,
for from 3.000 to o.tiOO vislt Its shores
dully In the suinmer, and inany bathe
ln Its waters. The lake eontnlns about
7.000.000,000 tons of snlt.
When the lake ls lilgh the snlt ls so
dllutod that It has jrone down to 11
l>er eent. Wheu It ls low. as It was
not mauy years n?o. It reacbad satura
tlon whleh for the inlx.nl lngredlents
of the water la 30 |>er eent.
There ls nothlng inysterlous about lt
any more than there would be about n
teaeup with a teaspoonful of salt ln
the bottora. If a tablespoonful of
water were put ln the eup on the snlt
it would taste very salty, but If the
eup were fllled to the brlm wlth water
lt would not.
The anlt has come from the wnter of
the rlvers flowlng Into lt sinee it
ceased to flow from its outlet. All
rlver water contalns salt. and the an
nual cvaporation of from two to five
eublc mlles of this water leuves large
qunntltles of salt behlnd. and so lt has
accumulated for thousanda of years.
Tha Teat of Groatnass.
When EMlstou went from London to
bls owu tbeater at Rtrniinghnui be
was knowa to scarvely a member of
bls own company. Ou reprimunding
one of tbein sbarply the lrate actor
Ibreatened to klek him off tbe stage.
He rusbed to the stage mamiger and
asked who that man was.
"Mr. A.." said the manager.
"A great man. a very great man."
sald Elllston. "He tbreatened to khk
lue. the lessee of Drury Eaue. Such a
man as that inust go to Londou. He
mustn't waste his energies here." And
he eugaged the actor ou the si>ot for
Dniry Laue.
His Mathod.
The little glrl who was vlsltlng at a
ueigbbor's house bad gone out to look
at tbe borses.
"Ilere's one of tbeni." she said. "that
has watery eyes and cougbs and hangs
bls head Just tbe way papa's horse dld
last summer."
"What dld your papa do for his
horse?" asked the owner of tbe ani
mals.
"He sold him," was the innocent an
awer.?Pearson's Weekly.
Tabla All Right.
"Do they have a good table?" aska
tbe prospective guest.
"It ls first rate," answers tbe man
who has Just i eturned?"solid oak.
with beavy legs ind a pollshed top."?
Judge.
. A Question of Qifta.
"Why dkl yon deliberately make an
enemy of your old frlend .links?"
"Beeause he ls to be married next
mottth."?fjppineott'a.
SUROFULA
Scrcfula disfigures and
causes life-Iong misery.
Children become
strong and lively when
given small doses of
Scott's Emulsion
every day. The starved
body is fed; the swollen
glands healed, and the
tainted blood vitalized.
Good food, fresh air and
Scott's Emulsion con
quer scrofula and many
other blood diseases.
FOR 8AX.H BY AI.I. DRUGGISTS
8end 10c, name of paper and this ad. for
ourbeautiful Savings Bank and Cliild's
Skctch-Book. Each bank contains a
Good I,uck Penny.
SCOTT * BOWNE. 40? P..H St.. N. Y.
0. J. HAMMELL CO.
piEmimuiE, n. j.
De igners and Manufacturers of Artist ic
Memorials in Marble and Granite.
OFWKMS? Atlantic City, N. J.; Phil
adeiphia, Pa ; Whealton, Va. Address
11. I'.ookerHale. Agent. Whealton.
SAMPLE OF OUR WORK.
This monument waa designed, exe
cuted and erected to the memory of
Dr. Lawrence Gunyon Mitchell, atFarn
ham Baptist Church, Richmond Co., Va.
Plani Mny^ '~??'(V.
YOU CAN HAVE
BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
TO BRIGHTEN YOUR HOME
A!l winter. at Chriatmaa tlmc. at Ka-ster time, alao
in your lawna and flower-bcd* at the lirst opcnin*
of spring time IF YOU PLANT NOW.
BOLCMNO'S FALL BUL6S.
Our beautiful illuatrated 24-paire fall flower eat
alotrue will be cheerfully aent to you if you drup
us a poatal toduy.
100
.$2,110
2.75
4.50
7.60
3.50
.75
.75
1.50
1.50
.85
.75
1.50
.75
1.00
.76
.46
.75
7.60
7.50
FREE?Send ua 2c in atamps to pay postajre
and im-ntion the name of thia paper, ancl we will
sm.iI you a 10c packajre of any flower aeed you
w?nt to ftrow in the houaa thia winter. Your local
Merchant can g-et from ua what fall bulba you
want. if be doea not sell our fall hulba you can
a?nd your order to ua. and w? wil! see that they
will rearh you in perfect condition.
J. BOLGIANO & SON,
Four Generations in the Seed Buaineas,
Light, Pratt and Ellicott Sta.,
BALTIMORE, MD.
WILD DECOY GEESE.
SEVERAL TAME WILD-GANDERS
(great honkers) can be procured
as decoys. Addresa Virginia Citi?
zen, Irvington, Va.
For Coughs and Colds
Troubled with a cough? A hard cold, bronchitis, or some
chronic lung trouble? There is a medicine made for just
these cases?Ayer's Cherry Pectoral. Your doctor knows
all about it. Ask him what he thinks of it. No medicine
can ever take the place of your doctor. Keep in close
touch with him, consult him frequently, trust him fully.
No alcohol in this cough mctlicine. J.^.AyerCo.lotoellMa^.
Ayer's PiU*. Sugar-coatcd. All vcgetaMa. Ad directly on the livcr. Cently laxa
live. Dose, only on? pill. Sold for iu arly sixly years. Ask your doctor about them
TO XERCHANTS, CANNERS
AND BOAT OWNERS:
Buy your coal oll, gajollne oll
and lubrlcatlng olls from us. We
guarantee full measure, and low
eat wholesale prlcea. Large ware
house and complete atock. We
pay cash for empty oll barrols.
W. A. DAMERON & BRO.f
Agent 8tandard Oll Co.,
Wccm?. Va.
ENCINE
FOR SALE.
30 horse power, two cylinder, gaso
line Marine engine complete, for sale.
To a quick buyer we will sell at a
bargain.
OWEN'S RAILWAY,
WEEMS, VA.
BRICK! BRICK! BRICK!
The place to buy Brick is at
LEVINT.BUCK&CO'S.,
Manufacturera of
all grades of
PAVING AND BUILDING 8RICKS
We can deliver Brick to
any point on water front.
Rappahannock
Marine Railway Co?
WEEMS, VA.
Now cqulppcd for haullng
aud rcpalring all claaaea of
hoata ln these watera.
We alao have a rompctent
force of carpentcra.caulkera
and rlggcra. Terma rnodei
ate; aatlafaction euaranteod
We alao have a nloe lino
of moulda for launchee and
yachta Call aud aee u*.
WHEN IN N0RF01K STOP AT
"THE ATLANTIC."
Most conveniently located Hotel ?
CORNER MA1N AND GRANUY STS.
Rooms $1.00 and $1.50.
American Plan $2.o0 and $3.00.
Fine Cafe (Lynn's) newly fitted up
on first floor.
Rappahannock Valley people make it
headquartera.
MONUMENTS AND
GRAVESTCNES.
To all who contemplate
theerectionof a Monument,
Statue or Gravestone in
Marble or Granite, it will
be to their interest to call
on or address
LAWSON & NEWTON,
Cor. llth and Williams Sta.,
NORFOLK. - VA.
Bell 'I'nonfl No. 87?2.
What would be more appreciated
than a well finished and good like
ness of a friend or relative? Then
why not go to
WM. FREEMAN,
PHOTOCRAPHER,
1268 and 270 MAIN ST.,
NORFOLK, ? VIRGINIA?
Who is considered one
of the best in the south.
PICTURE FRAMES. EASTMAN
KOllAKS AND SUPPLIES.
Special attention to finiahing for
amateurs.
PROPESSIONAL.
?J# W. PALMKK,
DENTI8T,
Will l,?> in Iii-ed\iIL-tl?e tirat Monday of
eatli inonth uml remain two weeka. Tbe
roatof ruontb in Kilmarnock. Hank HMK
^yARNEK BALL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Mona8kon, Lancaster Co., Va.
Will praotice in all tbe Courts of tbla and
adJoiniDKCountiea. ??????
Promptattontionstven to all legal buaineaa
J)R. G. H. OLIVER,
RESIDENT OENTIST.
IRVINGTON. - - VIRGINIA,
(Offloe over Rana.)
Httroaa OxMa Gaaaduiintatered.
Appoiiitmenta for nittin?r? of anv len?th
aboulil >><? mailt-sexcral days inad\anci>
Tcrm*: Cash.
Yfm McDONALD LEE,
(NOTAKY PUBLIC.)
CIVILENOINEERANDSURVETOS
IRVINGTON. VA
iMda aurvcyed and i.lats made. Ratl
mnti-s Ptana and RpeelftratKHM ror BrMm
and \ iH.lnrt work nnd eonatroetion* off all
i^uXtuE*' ,0,,"K,ui,h> ??<> DiMchtta?

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