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The evening leader. (Tarpon Springs, Fla.) 191?-19??, November 19, 1914, Image 1

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VOL. 1. SINGLE COPY FIVE CENTS.
TEN INMATES LOST THEIR LIVES
IN STATE REFORM SCHOOL FIRE.
ONE OF WHOM WAS CLIF»
FORD JEFFORDS OF
CLEARWATER.
HOLOCAUST OCCURRED
AT MARIANNA, FLA.
Two Dormitories Burned—All the
Victims Were Inmates, White
Boys—Part List.
Pensacola, Fla., Nov. 10.—Eight in
mates, white boys, and two attaches,
of the Florida State Reform school at
Marianna, Jackson county, Fla., were
burned to death at an early hour this
morning, when fire, starting from the
explosion, it is supposed, of a huge
kerosene lamp used for illuminating
one of the halls in the main dormi
tory for white boys, exploded.
The victims were:
Bennett Eivans, a carpenter.
Charles Evans, a guard.
Inmates were:
Joe Weathersby, Jacksonville.
Walter Fisher, Tampa (Plant City.)
Clarence Parrott, Southland.
Louis Fernandez, Key West.
Harry Wells, Jacksonville.
Earl E. Morris, Lakeland,
Waldo Drew, St. Petersburg.
■Clifford Jeffords, Clearwater.
Door Leading to Fire Escape Was
Locked.
For some reason it appears to have
been a rule of the institution that the
door learing to the fire escape be kept
locked. Two Yale padlocks secured
the door, and this formed a death
trap. It was impossible for the two
men and the eight boys to break down
the door leading to the fire escape.
The absence of a night guard allow
ed the fire to gain great headway be
fore it was
The fire broke out snoritf fcerore 4
•o’clock.
Acting Superintendent Willie Bell
of Pensacola came near to losing his
life. Bell is the young man formerly
an employe of the First National bank
of this city who two years ago pleaded
guilty to robbing the bank of $50,000
in currency which he hid in an alley
way at the rear of the bank where
it was found when he confessed. He
was convicted and sent to the federal
reform school at Washington. Since
his release from that institution Bell
has been assistant superintendent of
the reform school at Marianna.
Fisher Sent to Reform School From
Tampa Court.
Walter Fisher was sent to the re
form school for a term of four years
by Judge E. V. Whitaker, April 28,
1914, and was taken to Marianna by
Deputy Sheriff Arthur Brooks. He
was charged with stealing a bicycle in
Plant City, that latter place being his
home. He was sixteen years of age
when he entered the school.
Jeffords Had Been There Only Two
Weeks.
i Clearwater, Fla., Nov. 18*—Clifford
Jeffords, who lost his life at Marianna
today in the fire at the state industrial
school, according to a telegram re
ceived today by his mother, a widow,
was sent to the industrial school but
two weeks ago. He was not sent
there fore any misdemeanor, but sim
ply because he would not attend
school. With no father to care for him.
his mother found it hard to control
the boy. He was a bright, honest lad,
according to his former employers,
the Clearwater Sun, for whom he car
ried papers for five weeks and had
only the fault of truancy.
" 4,
Working on Message.
Washington, Nov. 18.—President
Wilson today began work on his an
nual /message to Congress which he
.will .deliver in person at the opening
of Hie regular session in December.
TORNADO STRUCK DELRAY;
§ MANY HOUSES DAMAGED.
West Palm Beach, Nov. 18.—A tor
nado struck the negro section of Del
ray, seventeen miles south of here,
yesterday afternoon and damaged
twenty-six houses.
houses were comp’etely de-
while many roofs were tak
en off. Rain approaching a cloud
burst was falling at the time.
THE EVENING LEADER
################
* EXPLOSION THROWS *
* BOILER TWO BLOCKS; *
* MILL’S OWNER KILLED. ft
ft %
=B* Monroe, La., Nov. 18.—An ex- ft
ft plosion at the mill of the Mon- ft
ft roe Shingle Company today cata- ft
ft pulted a huge boiler two blocks ft
ft from the mill. It passed over two ft
ft dwellings in its flight, clipping a ft
ft chemney from one, cut down, ft
ft two trees and landed between two ft
ft other houses. C. S. Stewart, own- ft
ft er of the mill, was instantly kill- ft
ft ed, a fireman probably fatally ft
ft hurt and one person less serious- ft
ft ly injured. ft
ft ft ft & ft ft ft ft ft ft & ft ft ft ft ft #
BETTER FEELING
VERY WIDE-SPREAD
BUSINESS THROUGHOUT ENTIRE
COUNTRY BEGINNING ON
MODERATE BOOM.
COTTON GOES UP CENT A POUND
Secretary McAdoo Says Anxiety
About Insufficient Money and
Credit it at an End.
Washington, Nov. 18.—Secretary
McAdoo said:
“The opening of the Federal reserve
banks will put. an ej)d to the annual
anxiety about crops,? They will des
troy permanently extreme fluctuations
>4 ,
in interest rates and available credits.
The supply of credits will be absolute
ly responsive to the demand, and busi
ness will be freed from the restric
tions, limitations and injuries frpm
which it has suffered in the past. The
whole country is to be congratulated
upon this final step in an achievement
I which promises such incalculable ben
efits to the American people.”
Boom in Chicago.
Chicago, Nov. 18.—The opening of
the Federal Reserve Bank in this dis-
I trict released about $32,000,000 of
gold held in reserve. Os this Chicago
banks released about $25,000,000.
In anticipation of the opening Mon
day interest dropped in the middle of
last week from 7 to 6 per cent. It is
; predicted that_ the rate will soon go
| to 5 and
I The ease in the money situation has
I started up widespread building im
j provements. Railroad conditions in
the West are better than a year ago.
St. Louis Feels Effect.
St. Louis, Nov. 18.—The St. .Louis
Federal Reserve Bank District has
been for some time enjoying the ad
vantages of the change in reserve re
quiremnts, the large St. Louis banks,
with hardly an exception, having re
tained in their vaults only about 18
per cent, of demand deposits, the re
serve requirement under the new bank
ing law.
The new law has already stimulated
wholesale buying here and merchan
dise is moving out more freely than
was expected.
Second Boston Bank.
Boston, Nov. 18.—The Federal Re
serve Bank of Boston, begins business
with subscribed capital of $9,931,740,
and in that respect will rank second to
but one Boston bank. The deposits <ff
1 444 depositors will run to about $30,-
1000,000, it is estimated.
Means End of Panics.
San Francisco, Cal., Nov. 18.—The
Federal Reserve Bank for the San
Francisco District, which includes Cal
ifornia, Oregon, Washington* Idaho,
Nevada and Arizona, expects to have
within the week $10,000,000 on deposit.
The membership banks in this district
The tornado did not strike except
in the colored section. Very little, if
, any insurance was carried. The houses
[ for the most part belonged to the
negroes living at Delray.
This is the second tornado to strike
• Delray within a year. The first one
■ took away several structures on the
ocean beach, and destroyed a church.
TARPON SPRINGS, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1914.
Summary of War News.
Subscriptions to the Austrian war
loan were opened Monday and the first
day’s operations in this respect are
considered extremely successful. Be
sides a number of large subscriptions,
several hundred thousand dollars in
smaller amounts have been offered.
Among the Russian prisoners cap
tured by the Germans in the battle
of Kutno were the governor of War
saw and his staff, according to a Ber
lin telegram forwarded to Reuter’s
Telegram Company from Amsterdam.
Telegraphing from Dunkirk, France
the correspondent of the Daily Mail
says:
“There was heavy fighting around
Ypres Monday. The casualties were
large, but the battle resulted in ex
cellent progress for the allies.
“The German casualties are estima
ted at 100,000 in the past four days.”
A dispatdh from Copenhagen to the
SHARPE WILL TAKE OVER
DUTIES AT PARIS LATE IN
PRESENT MONTH,
Paris, Nov. 19.—Myron T. Herrick,
the American ambassador who is to be
relieved of his duties late this month
by William G. Sharpe, has engaged
passage for the United States on the
steamer Rochambeau, which will sail
on November 28.
Queen Mary of England has written
Mrs. Herrick a personal letter express
ing appreciation for what she ahd oth
er American women have done for the
British wounded in Paris.
TURKER MUST
GIVE REASON
WHY SHOT WAS FIRED AT
LAUNCH OF CRUISER
TENNESSEE.
Washington Officials Say They Believe
Act Was Friendly One Instead
Os Being Hostile.
Washington, Nov. 18.—The United
States government has directed Am
bassador Morganthau at Constantino
ple, to ask an explanation of the fir
ing by Turkish forces at the launch
from the American cruiser Tennessee.
Secretary Daniels simultaneously ca
bled the commanders of the Tennessee
and the North Carolina which also is
in Mediterranean waters, to take no
action which might embarass the
American government, and to await
instructions from Washington.
Officials here decline to believe that
the firing was an unfriendly or hos
tile act. They thought the firing was
a friendly act, giving the customary
warning by a signal shot that the port
of Smyrna was mined and closed, else
the boat was turned back because by
its attempt to enter without a pre
vious arrangement with the Turkish
authorities. These views, they ad
mitted, were purely speculative.
SMALL WIRELESS PLANT
CAUSED ALL THE ALARM
Tampa, Nov. 18.—A small wireless
plant erected by amateurs at Central
ia, four miles from Bayport, Hernan
do county, was found today to be the
cause of anxiety at Washington over
the supposed operation of a German
radio station near here. The plant has
a limited area but not sufficient to
reach vessels at sea. The government
agent from Washington to investigate
has not yet arrived.
have an approximate capital of $130,-
000,000.
'The leading bankers of San Francis
co believe that the opening of the Re
serve bank will prevent any recur
rence of financial panic.
Bank Laws Extended.
Philadelphia, Nov. 18.—The Federal
Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, has sub
scribed capital of over $12,000,000 and
it opened with $2,000,000 capital paid
in. The change in reserve require
ments will release about $12,500,000
and the member banks will be able to
enlarge their accommodations to bor
rowers to about $50,000,000.
Much Released at Kansas City.
Kansas City, Nov. 18.—Reserves re
leased in Federal Reserve District No.
10 by the Federal Reserve Act approx
Star says it is learned from a German
source that a Russian squadron has
left Helsingsfors, Finland, and is
steering southwest with the supposed
intention of engaging the German
Baltic squadron.
The nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant
quotes a letter from a Galician priest
stating that 40,000 Austrians have
been buried in one day in a grave six
and one-half feet wide, and little more
than four miles long. The bodies, the
letter says, were laid next to each oth
er in; three layers. These men were
it is stated, during a battle
lasting only a few hours.
A dispatch to Reuter’s Telegram
Company from Brussels via Amster
dam states that the governor of Na
mur province anonunces that the
clearing work of the Meuse has so
far progressed that the river, from
Rhine to Namur, will be navigable
next Sunday.
McADOO DECLARES BIG
COTTON RELIEF FUND
WILL PROVE SUCCESS.
Washington, Nov. 17.—Secretary
McAdoo reiterated today that the
$135,000,000 cotton loan fund has not
been abandoned, and characterizes
predictions that it is likely to fail as
eminating “undoubtedly from some
interests opposed to the fund.”
“The required subscriptions,” Mr.
McAdoo said, “are almost complete,
and it is said that a definite announce
ment will be made within the next few
days.”
WRIGHT HAD
CLOSE CALL
TELLS OF SHOOTING ON
BOARD CLYDE STEAM
ER MOHAWK.
Got fAblet in- Hip When-F. W. R. Hin
man Was Killed by Madman
Last Wednesday.
(St. Petersburg Times.)
Benjamin H. Wright, who was
wounded on the steamer Mohawk,
when F. ,W. R. Hinman, of Jackson
ville was killed by a demented pas
senger last Wednesday night, reached
St. Petersburg last night from Jack
sonville. Mr. Wright carries with him
as a souvenir of his trip down from
New York, a .32-caliber bullet, in
his right hip, and a pair of crutches,
as he is unable to walk, owing to the
wound.
• Mr. Wright tells a graphic story of
the killing of Mr. Hinman by George
Batcheller Perkins, a Boston archi
tect, who is being held in Charleston,
S. C., for a hearing. Besides Mr.
Wright, Captain Andrew Ingram, of
the Mohawk, was wounded by Perkins
having a bullet hole in his abdomen.
“The events of last Wednesday
night, just a week ago tonight, by the
way,” said Mr. Wright last night,
“will be vivid in my mind as long as
I live I am glad to be here and I
am lucky to be alive.”
BRITISH AVIATOR DROPS
BOMB, KILLING CITIZENS.
London, Nov. 17. —(3:53 p. m.)—
The Central News publishes a dis
patch from Amsterdam saying that a
German newspaper appearing in Brus
sels declares that a British aviator has
dropped a bomb on the town of Cour
trai, in Belgium, on the River Lys,
twenty-six miles southwest of Ghent.
The explosion of the bomb killed fif
teen of the local population.
imate $57,000,000. Os this sum at least
$10,000,000 is released in Kansas City.
The Federal Reserve Bank here
opens with an initial capital of $925,-
000 and deposits of $12,000,000. At the
end of . the thirty-six months the cap
ital will approximate $2,800,000 and
deposits $32,000,000. The bank clear
ings for Kassas City last week were
$80,039,583, as against $63,098,740 in
the corresponding week of last year.
Minneapolis Feels Stimulation.
Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 18.—Bank
reserves in the Ninth Federal Reserve
District released by the opening of
the Reserv Bank in Minneapolis Mon
day approximately $43,000,000. Every
section has begun to feel the stimu
lating effect already. One of the most
significant results has been the deci
(Continued on Page 4.)
MEXICAN KALEIDOSCOPE SHOWS
VILLA MARCHING TO MEXICO CITY.
ft*:##############
ft INDICTMENT AGAINST ft
ft FORMER TREASURER ft
ft OF U. S. QUASHED, ft
ft ft
ft New York, Nov. 18.—The in- ft
ft dictment charming Daniel N. Mor ft
ft gan, former Treasurer of the ft
ft United States, and six others ft
ft charged with using the mails to ft
ft defraud stock investors in connec- ft
ft tion with the operations of Jared ft
ft Flagg, was quashed today 1 upon ft
ft motion of the United States dis- ft
ft trict attorney, who said the testi- ft
ft mony of Flagg’s trial showed ft
ft that Mr. Morgan and his six ft
ft associates were not guilty. ft
ft##########ftft ft ft ft
MONEY IS EASIER
NOW EVERYWHERE
NEW FINANCIAL SYSTEM AL
’ READY BRINGING GOOD
RESULTS.
MILLIONS RELEASED BY MOVE.
Money Easier and a Stimulation of
Trade and Manufactures Is Seen
In Almost Every Section.
New York, Nov. 18.—With the open
ing of the twelve Federal Reserve
Banks there was released, Comptrol
ler estimates, $460,000,000 in gold and
legal tenders, which will form the ba
sis for a loan expansion throughout
the country of $1,000,000,000 approx
imately. There was released in New
York alone $160,000,000 of the re
serve.
This means that the credit facilities
of the metropolis were so increased
thrat'there Is an abundance iXSftgy
now for the encouragemqjft of every
legitimate business ejrferprise. The
banks have already deduced their rates
for loans to practically a normal basis
for this season of the year. Within
three and one-half months, after one
of the worst financial crises through
which the country has ever passed* the
banking situation has been restored to
normal and there is therefore no rea
son why business should not be re
sumed along the customary lines with
confidence.
Good Sign.
Signs of returning confidence among
investors are afforded by sharp ad
vances in securities during the last
ten days and the removal on last Fri
day of all restrictions on dealings in
unlisted stocks. The reopening of the
New York Stock Exchange is being
hastened by the growing demand for
securities and the rapid building up
of a trade balance with Europe, which
will offset any liquidation by it in
American stocks and bonds.
FIRE AT FORT MYERS
BURNS THREE HOTELS
Hendry and Tonnelier Buildings and
Several Other Structures
Wiped Out.
Fort Myers, Fla., Nov. 18.—An early
morning fire today destroyed property
of a value close to $75,000. The loss
includes the Michigan hotel, Florida
house, Kentucky house, Tonnelier
building and the Hendry building.
The alarm was sounded at 3:45
o’clock when the restaurant of T. Le
nas was discovered to be in flames.
The fire was soon communicated to
the Tonnelier building, then to the J.
A. Hendry building, all of these being
destroyed early in the fire. The Flori
da house was next to catch and it was
destroyed. For quite a while it ap
peared as though the Henderson store
would burn. Splendid work on the
part of the firemen saved this building
but the Green tailor shop and the Ho-
GERMANY WILL ALLOW AID
SENT TO BELGIAN PEOPLE.
Washington Nov. 18.—Germany will
welcome American assistance in re
lieving the Belgians. Mr. Bryan issued
this statement:
“The German government is doing
everything possible to help the suffer
ing population of Belgium and will
welcome any assistance given by
TEN CENTS A WEEK. NO. 266.
IS AT HEAD OF AN ARMY
OF 22 THOUSAND
SOLDIERS.
CARRANZA REPUDIATES
GONZALEZ TELEGRAM.
Says He Was Misunderstood and Did
Not Intend to Retire in Favor of
Gutierrez.
Washington, Nov. 18.—General Vil
la, commanding the troops under con
trol of the Aguas Calientes conven
tion, is marching on Mexico City. His
army today reached Leon, the first
important railroad center southe of
Aguas Calientes. General Pablo Gon
zales and Carranza forces are at
Quaretaro and Irapto, where the first
important clash between Carranza and
the convention probably will occur.
American consul Silliman has tele
graphed that conditions are far more
serious in Mexico City /than at any
other time since peace parleys began.
He regards actual hostilities as inevi
table, though some of the generals
still are trying to patch up the dif
ferences between the factions.
Carranza, according to messages
from Silliman and Leon Canova, spe
cial agent at Aguas Calientes, declar
ed, that he had been misunderstood
and that he never intended to deliver
the excutive power except to seme
man of his own selection.
Alleges Truce Was Violated.
Mexico City., Nov. 18.—Gen. Alvaro
Obregon, who yesterday assumed com
mand of the capital and of the federal
district, last night received a telegram
from Gen. Pablo Gonzales in which the
latter declared that General Villa, by
repeatedly broken the truce agreement
entered into November 12 by General
Gonzales and Gen. Eulalio Gutierrez,
who was recently chosen provisional
president by the Aguas Calientes con
vention. General Gonzales concluded
his message with the following:
* “For my part I believe that I have
complied with my duties as a soldier
and a citizen. I have tried to avoid
the shedding of blood which the enemy
appears thirsty for, and the war
which we are obliged to prosecute with
all vigor forthwith is justified by the
unworthy conduct of our opponents.”
A large body of troops belonging to
General Obregon’s division arrived
here last night from Irapuato, twenty
nine miles southwest of Guanajuata.
General Alvardo, post commander,
has issued a statement in which he
declares that General Villa is a great
er enemy to the cause of Mexican de
mocracy than was General Huerta.
He says that Villa has forced an un
necessary civil war on Tdexico.
It is reported here that General
Carranza will move his capital to Vera
Cruz immediately upon the evacuation
of that city by the Americans.
Carranza Repudiates Telegram.
Washington, Nov. 18.—General Car
ranza has repudiated the telegram
sent for him by Gen. Pablo Gonzales
to Gen. Eulalio Gutierrez in which
the first chief was represented as
saying he would retire. This was an
nounced today in an official dispatch
from American Consul Siliman.
Carranza declared he had misunder
stood. In the telegram sent, the first
chief was described as ready to re
sign if both he and Villa relinquished
their commands and meet in Havana
not later than November 25.
tel Michigan and J. E. Prince’s elec
tric shop also burned down before the
fire could be checked. The Leon hotel
barely escaped destruction.
The estimated loss is $75,000, with
but little insurance.
Americans.” Relief work will proceed
entirely through private channels,
President Wilson said today. He an
nounced he had rejected the idea of
appointing an official commission. It is
understood relief work done officially '
would not be regarded as a neutral
act. Individuals, however, are perfect
ly free to send aid.'

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