OCR Interpretation


The Alaska citizen. (Fairbanks, Alaska) 1910-1917, September 24, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060002/1917-09-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ALASKA CITIZEN
VOL VIII._]-.\lK;:.\NRS. ALASKA. MONDA\ MORNING, SEPTEMBER 24, 1**17._ no. 31
CONGRESS WILL PROBABLY
INVESTIGATE BERNSTORFF
PLAN TO BRIBE MEMBERS
(Associated Press')
\\ ASH I XH I ON, 1). C., Sept. 22. Chairman Mood
(>• the house foreign affairs committee, after conferring
with Secretarc of State Robert Pausing, announced tlus
afternoon that there will probably be a house investigation
of Kerustorffs plan to influence congress by expending
$50, (XX>.
The investigation will be held for the purpose of ascer
tabling to what extent, if any, members of congress were
influenced be the efforts of the former Herman ambassador.
NO REFLECTION ON CONGRESS.
WASHINGTON, D. C.. Sept. 22. Alter a conference
with Representative Mood, chairman of the foreign attain
committee of the house. Secretary ot State Robert Lansing
todav gave out the following interview:
"1 do not see how Hern-tor ft'.- message rellects upon
eongres- or am member ot that body. Apparently it was
Hern-tor ifs purpose to employ secret agencies to intluence
congressmen and they would have no knowledge that such
agencies were being employed. 1 bus the} would have no
knowledge that they were being influenced and would be
entirely innocent ot wrong doing.
“1 do not know what organization the former German
.ambassador intended to employ to intluence the eongres.
men and in publishing the contents tit the note there was no
intention of casting suspicion on any members ot congress.
NO NEW DETAILS.
W ASHINGTON, 1). C., Sept. 22. Chairman Mood oi
the foreign relations committee ot the house called upon
Secretary of State Robert Lansing toda} in an attempt to
-ecure more details regarding the Hernstorff message. At
ter returning from the secretary ot state's office, the con
gressman declared that Lansing had given him no new in
i.irmation on the subject.
XEXAXA, Sept. 22.—That railroad construction work
i n the north bank of the Tanana river opposite Xenana will
start early next spring, is indicated by the preparations be
mg made by the Engineering commission to land several
thousand seventy-pound rails on that side of the river. '1 he
fact that seventy-pounders are being placed there is also
evidence that the work next spring will be of a permanent
nature; that is, that standard guage railroad will be con
structed, as forty-pounders are being used only in narrow
guage work.
lack Bellerby, head wharfinger of the American-Yu
kon Xavigation company, and Roy Lamb, mechanical lore
man of the Engineering commission, have selected a suit
able site for landing the rails. It is also stated that a der
rick is to be rigged for landing the rails at the site either
tomorrow or next day, and it is therefore expected that the j
next barge loads of steel brought in will be landed there.
These preparations are taken as a certain indication
that the line to Fairbanks is to be of the same construction
ns the remainder of the rfoad. They also indicate that
work on that side of the river will start as early as possible
next spring.
SOUTH OF XEXAXA
It is understood here that the laying of track south of
Xenana is to continue after the freezeup. The object of con
tinning the work at this time, it is stated, is to get a steam
shovel out to Thirty-five mile, where there is a bill of dry
gravel. This gravel will be used as ballast. It is further
understood that a small force is to be kept on the work of
building grade all winter.
YOU CANNOT LOOK INTO A CAN OF FRUIT
BUT YOU
Know By the Label That It's Good
GET A
Suit of Clothes
or Overcoat
WITH A
Adler-Rochester, Stein-Bloch
or Stadium Label
AND YOU CAN REST ASSURED THAT
ITffHASi QUALITY
NEW SHIPMENTS JUST ARRIVED.
LOOK ’EM OVER BEFORE BUYING **
Prices $2^0 to ggSQ
M. A. PINSKA
Successor to Sargent &. Pinska
Fairbanks Dawson
“THE FROST IS ON THE PUMPKIN, AN’ THE FODDER’S IN THE SHOCK"
i
£
S ;
S' \ \ J
S a. * :
UTTLE
TER.
TROST, £h,
Mister.
HOhEwZOLURH
•? r
Roosevelt on Staff
Of Kansas City Star
FORMER PRESIDENT ACCEPTS A
POSITION AS EDITORIAL
WRITER IN KANSAS.
i Associated Press)
KANSAS (TTY, Sop!. 22. For
mer President Theodore Roose
velt has joined the staff of the
Kansas (Tty Star and will con
tribute editorials, according to an
announcement made by that pa
per tonight.
The announcement came as a
great surprise to the city as well
as the nation, and telegrams of
congratulations are pouring in
upon the Star for its enterprise
in adding the noted American to
the staff. The size of the salary
of the salary of Editorial Writer
Roosevelt lias not been disclosed.
STEEL WORKERS
IN SHIP YARDS
STRIKE MONDAY
(Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, D. C„
Sept. 22.—The situation in
the shipyard strike has reach
ed a critical stage, and unless
progress is made in negotia
tions, the metal workers in the
steel yards will probably
strike Monday, tying up ev
ery steel shipyard in Seattle
and the state excepting the
Skinner N Eddy plant, which
has granted the new scale,
granting an advance of 33
per cent in wages.
The owners of other steel
plants, however, refuse to
meet the demands of the
workers, and a walkout next
Monday morning is believed
to be inevitable.
WHALE MEAT
IS DELICACY
AT ARMY POST
(Associated Press >
SAN" FRANCISCO, Sept. 22.-Pa
cific ocean whale meat was the deli
cacy enjoyed by the soldiers at Fort
Winfield Scott today. Tried as an
experiment and because of the nov
elty of it, the soldiers liked the dish
and have asked that it be served
to them frequently.
This morning the soldiers ate one
hundred pounds of whale meat for
breakfast. So well did they like it
that they ate up the entire amount.
Mrs. H. G. Cloes returned, to Fair
banks yesterday after spending the
summer with her husband, who is
engaged in farming at Hot Springs.
i As.soei fed Press)
WASHINGTON. I). C„
Sept. 22. -In a bulletin stvled
“official expo e,“ the commit
tee on publiif information to
day made MP’Hc the docu
ments seized in the raid on
the oliices of W olfe \ onigle
at New York in April, 1910,
which show that Germany,
through her representatives in
the United States, and
thn^igh Ambassador Ilerns
torif himself before the break
in relations conspired to vio
late the laws of the United
States.
The documents show how
these German agent.-, plotted!
tor the destruction of lives)
and property on merchantmen j
on the high seas, fomented
the Irish revolution against
Kngland, stirred up ill feeling
in Mexico against the United
States and subornated Ameri
can writers to write German
propaganda.
I he documents show that
German_\' maintained in Am
erica a bureau to stir up trou
ble in munition plants and to
conduct a bomb making indus
try. One of the letters in
dicts Captain Yon Papen, for
mer military attache. The
letter shows that Von Papen
paid a man SI 50 who prom
ised to place bombs resem
bling lumps of coal on vessels
of the allies leaving Ameri
can ports.
The seized documents show
that money was sent from
German sources in America
to aid the Irish revolutionary
plan of Sir Roger Casement,
who was executed in London.
Receipted bills show that
thousands of dollars were
paid to agents. One report
of Yonigel’s deals with troops
in California and the annu
lment of coast fortifications.
DIVERS RAID
CONVOY SHIPS
(Associated Press)
AN ATLANTIC PORT, Sept. 22.
| Passengers arriving from England to
day brought a circumstantial report
that five British steamships and two
destroyers out of a convoy fleet of
six such vessels, which left Lough
Swilly, Ireland, on September 3, were
sunk a few hours after leaving port.
One submarine and probably two
were sunk by the destroyers.
Kaiser’s Personal Spy
Is Now In the Toils
KARL ARMGAARD GRAVES IS IN
TERNED AT KANSAS CITY
FOR LENGTH OF WAR.
' A ssilimited Press t
KANSAS CITY, Sept. 22. Karl
Arnlgaard Graves, a spy of inter
national reputation and claiming
to be the kaiser's personal spy,
has been arrested hern and in
terned for the period of the
war.
His arrest was ordered by
President Wilson himself on in
formation that Graves is in the
pay of the German government.
Graves took his arrest calmly
and declared that he had been
expecting it for some time. He
made no attempt to conceal the
fact that, he is a spy.
NAVY SHELLS
GERMAN BASE;
GOOD RESULTS
(Assoriated Press)
LONDON, Sept. 22.- An
official report issued by the
war office tonight states that
British warships yesterday
bombarded the German naval
works at Ostend, on the coast
of Belgium, with satisfactory
results.
British planes co-operated
with the warships in the at
tack, directing the fire of the
ships and dropping high ex
plosives upon ships and docks
and other naval works. Three
German aeroplanes were
brought down bv British
aerial forces during the bom
bardment.
CONVOY PLAN
IS SOLUTION
OF SUB PERIL
(Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sept. 22.
t'nless some new outbreak in sub
marine activity develops, officials of
the navy department are satisfied
that the situation is now fairly well
under control. Encouraging results
have been obtained through a plan
of convoying fleets of merchantmen
by warships. This plan has been
followed by America since the early
days of America’s entry into the
war and has been the means of re
ducing losses- to less than one-half
of one per cent.
Mrs. August Hess is home again
after a several months' visit on the
Outside. She was met at Nenana
by her husband.
ULTIMATUM DEMANDS THAT
GERMANY MAKE REPARATION
(Associated Press)
BLT.NOS A IRKS, Sept. 22. Argentine is tonight on
the verge of actual hostilities with Germany. Backed In the
overwhelming sentiment of the people, the President has
I sent an ultimatum to Germany, demanding that the kaiser
make full and complete reparation for the sinking of Argen
tine ships and to guarantee that in the future they will not
'be molested by submarines.
1 he state department has not announced the time limit
given in the ultimatum, but it is believed that the lime P
very short. I lie tailure ol Germane to make a prompt and
satistacton reph will be lollowed b\ the enactment of a
resolution declaring that a state of war actmilh exists P
tween Argentine and Germane.
Argentine's entry into the war. if war is declared, wi i
be due to Germany s action in sinking \rgemhic ship a: .1
tor other violations of the rights of this counlrv. The a i
German leeling w;is fanned to a white heat last week wi m
the state department of the I'nited States di closed that the
German minister to Argentine sent nilormatin'i to Germai'v
regarding the ailing and destination of \rgentine -'dp - in
order that they might be torpedoed. This iti P inne t ion was
got It n to Germany through the complicity if f’:< Swedish
minister, wi n lorwarded the I'nTinan minister'- dispatche-.
BRITISH AEROPLANES DO
EXCELLENT FIGHTING IN
BIG BATTLE IN BELGIUM
(Associated I Cess )
LONDON, Sept. 22.- British aeroplanes played a verv
important part in the Battle oi the Mcnin Road which Hen
oral Haig began on I'hursdav with the intention oi cutth’g
through the Herman lines and isolating the Teuton troop
in western Belgium. An official statement is.-ued by the war
ollice today declares that during the fir-t two hour- <>
ritursday’s battle, low clouds and drizzling rain made id
ing almost impossible, hut w hen tlu wafer improved i,
British aerial activity became vxceedmgL great, t: v Tc:i a
planes being driven from the scene of battle. British planes
maintained contact with the advancing troop-, a great fleet
of aerial era ft hovering o\er the battlefield. Both aero
planes and captive balloons gave the ob-ci alioa- for the
artillery.
BLR LIN DLNIKS CLAIM
BKR1.1N, Sept. 22. I'lte British claim of ma-teiw of
the air on the western front i- flatly contradicted bv the
Berlin war office, which cites figures to show 11 ■:11 dm Teu
ton aviators still maintain the supremacy of the air.
An otlicial statement made by the war office tonighi de
clares that 39 enemy aeroplane- ware shot Lwu on f a
western front on Thursday and Lridax and that onlv 3 Her
man planes were lost.
- I
Dr. C'j. C. Martin, ol the l . .X. (icological Survey, who
reached Fairbanks yesterday, has just returned from the
1-ignite coal iields, 57 miles south oi N’euana, where he has
completed investigations preparatory to offering tlic lands
tor lease. Dr. Martin states that this work is supplementary
to the survey of the main part of the coal field which was
finished last year. At that time the coal on the west bank
of the Nenana river was not examined, hut this has now
been done.
The leasing offer of the mining units as provided In
law will soon be made, for after the survey by the general
land office the law requires that the land he divided into
blocks most suitable for economical mining. The coal lands
in the Bering river and Matanuska districts have already
been offered for lease in this manner.
The method of obtaining these lands may be learned
by applying to the secretary of the interior or the general
land office.
Dr. Martin is leaving today on the Sheldon stage for I
the coast, and he expects to go direct to Washington. ■
IMMIGRATION OFFICER HERE
TO DEPORT CHARLES LESTOR
Charles Lestor, the man who started the strike trou
ble at Nenana during the summer and who was later con
victed of libeling the flag and sentenced to serve a year in
jail, is to he deported, according to K. I.. Wells, a United
States inspector of immigration who reached Lairbanks on
the steamer Tanana last night. Whether or not Lestor will
be taken Outside at present remains undecided. He is now
serving his sentence, which was imposed upon him in com
missioner’s court at Nenana.
Lestor, Mr. Wells states, came to Alaska from Canada
without the permission of the officers ot the bureau of immi
gration and is therefore subject to deportation. The orders
regarding his case are stated to have come direct from the
bureau of immigration at Washington.

xml | txt