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The Alaska citizen. (Fairbanks, Alaska) 1910-1917, September 24, 1917, Image 5

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UNITED STATES MARINES
GUARD UNION IRON WORKS
WHERE CREW IS ON STRIKE
( A s ~ocia 1 ed Fl • ssl
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 1' Two
companies of Fnited States marines
were placed on cuard at the I'nion
Iron Woi i. ■ -1 ij I his is th<
• ■st plant involved in the strike of
nr,.000 shipworkers and employees in
the metal trades of the San Fran
cisco bay districts
Federal officials today took a hand
in the strik* situation and ordered
all salisms c losed within half a mile
of the shipyards.
As yet there have been no disturb
anees. and no attempt has been made
by the companies to operate with
non-union crews, as it is admitted
that skilled men are not available.
SEATTLE SITUATION UNCHANGED
SKATTT.K. Sept IS. The shipyard
strike situation in Seattle is still
unchanged. Steel yards are running
on the agreement made bj the ein
plovers that only such lumber as is
made in mills which have granted
the eight hour day, will be used.
Most of th.' wooden shipbuilding
plants are closed where the men
went on strike against using lum
her manufactured on the ten hour
day basis.
CIVIL RULERS
FOR BELGIANS
RESIGN JOBS
1 A: ~ui.iat.-il I’l-ess)
r.KRI.IN', Sept, 18. German papers
- IV that the resignation of I»r Von
Hamit, civil governor of Belgium,
and his assistant, Von Lutz, are in
conjunction with Germany's m w plan
as to the future of Belgium. The
su cessors have not yet been ap
pointed, hut it is helievc-d they will
be men more in accord with Ger
many's future plans for Belgium.
WAR TAX BILL
'A.-.- elated Press)
WASHINGTON L. S.-pt. IS.
I n ■'■■■■ apparent that final action
■ n the administration's war tax bill
. il, in all probability, be delayed un
til ;i♦ xt week. The delay is caused
t.y a Lain betw> en the senate and
h ;se conferees over a number of
INputed sections. The disagreement
Is the cause of considerable anxiety
in administration circles, as it has
te ■ u hoped that final action might
be forthcoming immediately.
WILSON GETS
HIGH HONORS
(Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Sept. 18. Announce
ment has been made here that Presi
dent Wilson has been declared to
have been the greatest humanitarian
of the world during the tear 1916,
and as such he is to be presented
with a medal in token of the fact
by the humanitarian cult of New
York. The presentation will take
place at the White House, Wash
ington, D. C„ on September 20. An
impressive ceremony in honor of the
occasion has been arranged.
NENANA ELECTS
SCHOOL BOARD
(Special to The Citizen)
NENANA, Sept. 18. Nenana held
its school election today and it re
sulted in the election of George W.
Pennington, Jack Brevig, J. D. O’Neil,
Carl Schmidt and Mrs. Matt Sweeney
as members of the first board of di
rectors of the schools of Nenana.
Mr. Pennington received the highest
number of votes, 247. Mr. Brevig
received the next highest, 246; Mr.
O’Neil, 225; Mr. Schmidt, 172, and
Mrs. Sweeney, 167. The other three
candidates, namely, Dr. I). H. More,
Fred Major and Mrs. M. J. Cooney,
received 160, 137 and 58 votes re
spectively.
The election today also decided
whi ther or not Nenana was to have
a school district. There were 207
votes cast for the district, with no
votes against it.
IS
WAR PRISONER
.Associated I’u-Kh)
PETROGRAD. Sept. Ik General
Korniloff, the leader of the recent
attempted revolt against the govern
ment, and twenty generals and other
officers of the disbanded rebel army,
arrived at Mohilev Friday under a
heavy guard, according to an an
nouncement made by the war olfici
this afternoon. All are being closely
guarded and are not permitted to
communicate with any of their ls.ind.
or relatives.
General Korniloff is impri- .tied at
Ins hotel at Mohilev and is- said to
be writing a statement setting forth
lv - side of the whom ar " in an
attempt to vindicate It is actions.
FINN OPS
\ . . tateil I’l. ss)
BEKSINGFORF, Sep:. is. Xvws
has 1. -on received here from Viborg,
the important Finnish port at the
northeast' n end of the Gulf of Fin
land, that the town is just recover
ing from the throes of rioting, dis
order and mutinies of soldiers against
their officers.
The soldiers in tlie military base
there participated in the rioting and
rose up again their commanders. As
a result, twenty officers are known
to have been killed, and -sixty are
missing.
)
(A- nciated Ft ess)
AMSTERDAM, Sept. 18. Authentic
informal’ .n was rec afi Imre today
front Teuton sources ot the effect
that allied aviators created great
havoc in their recent bombing raid
on Routirs, Belgium, occupied by the
Germans as a firs* ola.->s milittr*'
ba*'1. The report stairs tiiat in ad
dtion t) exploding ..nniisniii.tn di
p itdemolishing banack-. and crcat
ing otlict widespread destruction, tine
Gr-.i'vl German tr*>ci> rs were killed
in it is a of bom is.
KAISER TELLS
SWEDEN THAT
HE IS SORRY
(Associated Press)
STOCKHOLM, Sept. 18. The Ger
man minister to Sweden called at
the foreign office this afternoon and
expressed to the Swedish government
Germany’s regrets over the embar
| rassment brought on Sweden by dis
I closures that telegrams to Germany
| had been transmitted by the Swedish
I foreign office.
HUNDREDS ARE HOMELESS
IN NORTH CAROLINA WHEN
FLOODS INUNDATE VALLEYS
(Associated Press)
RALEIGH, N. C„ Sept. 18.—Floods
in\the eastern part of the state have
already done damage to hundreds of
thousands of dollars’ worth of prop
erty; three deaths have been report
ed and ftnore than three hundred are
homeless.\ The floods were caused
by a cloudburst following an unusu
ally long and\ heavy rainfall.
Heavy damagV is reported to crops
that were awaiting the harvest.
Three negroes were drowned and
many narrow escapes from the flood
are being reported. The bursting of
a dam at the town of Wallace to
day is driving three hundred farm
ers from their homes in the valley
to take. refuge on higher ground.
Many of them were obliged to flee
without being able to save any of
their personal or household effects.
Germans Release
Mayor of Brussels
(A—Delated Press)
BERLIN. Sept. 18 Announce
ment was made tonight th.u te f
many. at the request of the king
of Spain, will release Adolphe
Max. burgomaster of the Belgian
e.ty of Brussels, held b> the
Germans Burgomaster Max is
seriously ill in a German prison
and will be released in order to
return to his home The burgo
master was arrested early in the
war because of his irreooncillable
attitude toward the German civil
authorities.
BUTTE MINERS
HAVE RETURNED
TO WORK AGAIN
(Associated pi ess)
BUTTE, Mont.. Sept. 18. -The
properties of the Anaconda Copper
Mining company, elosed since Au
gust 24 by a walkout at the Washo
works at Anaconda, were opened
again today, when the striking min
ers resumed work.
The return of tne men was not
marked by any disturbance of any
kind, and no trouble occurred any
where. Horses and mules have been
lowered into the shafts, and also
machine drills.
Leaders of the Industrial Workers
of the World here have applied to
the military for protection, saying
they fear deportation, and this pro
tection has been promised. Night
shifts have been put on, and all the
mines and smelters of this district
are running continuously.
PLEASE PAGE
F. GRONHOLM?
(Associated Tus.-'
STOCKHOLM, Sept. 18. Inquiry
at the foreign office today elicited
the information that the present
whereabouts of Folke Gronholm, who
acted as messenger for the German
minister in Mexico Cily, is unknown.
Minister Gronholm was placed on the
diplomatic retired list on his return
from Mexico last December and ob
tained no other post. The opinion
prevails that he was retired for cause.
WITH THE U. S.
(Associated Press)
BERLIN, Sept. 18. Tile German
foreign office, in a statement to the
Associated Press today, officially de
nies .- dries appearing in Danish and
otmi papers saying ma. the com
ment has indirectly communicated
peace terms to Washington or en
deavored to sound the sentiment of
the Fnited States government on the
question of a settlement of differ
ences between these two countries on
the submarine warfare.
The German foreign office declared
that the German government has no
occasion to address such a communi
cation or any other communication
to Washington.
NEW CABINET
STATES AIMS
(Associated Press)
PARIS, Sept. 18.—The new French
cabinet, headed bv Premier Painleve,
made its initial appearance in the
chamber of deputies today, and be
fore a crowd that packed the gal
leries, stated its policies. The out
standing feature of the declaration
of the new ministry was the reaf
firming of the determination that
France will continue the war until
Germany gives up Alsace Lorraine
and also until Germany promises to
make full reparation for damage
done in northern France.
SUB BLOCKADE
HURTSJ>APERS
(Associated Press)
PARIS, Sept. 18.—Norwegian paper
manufacturers have served notice on
French publishers that they have
been obliged to cancel all contracts
to supply print paper, owing to the
German submarine blockade. This
will be a serious blow to French
newspapers financially and will make
it necessary for publishers to again
reduce the size of their publications.
AUSTRIA NOW
FACES FAMINE
THIS WINTER
(Associated Picas)
WASHINGTON, D. C.,
| Sept. 18.—In dispatches re
ceived here from Rome today
it is stated that the people ot
Austria Hungary are lacing
actual famine during the coin
ing winter. Already there is
much suffering among the
poorer classes, according to
the dispatches, the people of
Trieste being particularly in
want. Considerable surprise
is being expressed in official
circles here that the Austrians
in Trieste are able to hold
out against the siege ot the
city being carried on by the
Italians, on account of the
prevailing scarcity of food. It
is officially stated that the city
is completely surrounded In
die Italian forces and that
the food shortage will un
doubtedly force it to capitu
late within a short time.
ATTEMPT MADE
TO ROB BOXES
ON LIVENGOOD
That an attempt was made recent
ly to rob the sluice boxes on the
Fontas lease on Livengood creek, in
the Tolovana country, is the infor
illation received by J. J. Sherry, one
of the owners of the ground. The
letter received also states that the
thief secured nothing, as far as could
be ascertained, having been fright
rned away from his nefarious work
after he had raised three of the rif
fles. There is every indication that
the robbery was attempted by some
one very familiar with the Fontas
workings, but there is no clew to
:iie would-be thief other than the
pick with which he was working,
which he left behind in his hurry to
escape.
There are several strings of sluice
boxes under t.he big dump that is
out on the Fontas ground. They
lead away from the dump on the
opposite side from the boiler house,
consequently the sailing was easy
for the thief. But after he had
raised three of the riffles and was
preparing to raise a fourth he was
frightened away by the flow of wa
ter turned into the boxes, being evi
dently cognizant of the fact that the
flow of water meant that the men
employed on the ground would be
on the job in a few moments ready
to sluice while they had water with
which to work. He therefore made
a hurried escape, leaving the pick,
which is said to be altogether un
like any other instrument of its kind
oil the creek.
When tne men started to worn
they quickly discovered that the
sluice boxes had been tampered with.
An investigation was made immedi
ately which disclosed the fact that,
while the riffles had been raised,
ihe dirt in the boxes under them
had not been loosened from the bot
tom of the boxes, indicating that
the thief had been frightened away
before he had secured the gold bear
ing gravels which he had intended
to carry with him. The robbery was
attempted during the darkest hour
of the night—midnight—according to
the report.
This is not the first report of at
tempted sluice box robberies in the
Tolovana which has reached Fair
banks.
FRENCH CLAIM
A BIG GERMAN
ATTACK FAILS
(Associated Fress)
PARIS, Sept. IS.—The re
pulse of a strong German at
tacks in northern France
south of the Niette river is
chronicled in the official state
ment issued by the French
war office tonight.
After an unusually violent
bombardment last night south
of the river, the Germans
launched an attack in force
and succeeded in reaching the
French lines near the Neuf
chatel road. After a sharp
fight, the Germans were fin
ally ejected from the French
trenches, losing heavily in
dead and wounded and leav -
ing many prisoners in French
hands.
Dick Morris, of the Nenana firm
of Fowler & Morris, is a business
visitor in Fairbanks.
w arn Americans
From Petrograd
(Associated Press)
STOCKHOLM, Sweden. Sept.
18. At the American legation
here instructions were received
tonight that the officials of the
legation are to advise all Am
ericans who are preparing to
leave Sweden for Petrograd not
to do so. The instructions come
direct from the state department
of the United States and are
undoubtedly authoritative Noth
ing regarding the reason for the
order is stated in it, but W is
known that the American gov
eminent fears for the safety of
its citizens who are now in Pet
rograd on account of the unset
tled conditions there
ASKS GOMPERS
TO END STRIKE
IN COAST YARDS
(Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sept. 18.
Chairman Hurley of the Fnited States
shipping board today appealed to
Samuel Gompers, president of the
American Federation of Gabor, to
take steps to bring an end to the
strikes in Pacific coast shipyards
which have tied up work on govern
ment ship construction. Hurley and
Gompers will hold a conference to
morrow to see if some measures
cannot be taken to get the men back
on the job.
Chairman Hurley today held a con
ference with Secretary of the Navy
Josephus Daniels to learn in what
manner the navy department settled
recent wage demands in government
navy yards. The same method of
procedure may be followed to bring
an end to the strike in private yards
engaged in government shipbuilding
Chairman Hurley is planning to
make a trip to the coast in person
in the near future to attempt to
bring about a settlement.
HURLEY LEAVES FOR COAST
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sept. IS.
From shipping board headquarters
here announcement was made tonight
to the effect that Chairman Edwin
Hurley will leave tomorrow for the
Pacific coast in the Interests of the
government’s ship building program
and to make an attempt to adjust
tne labor troubles which are holding
up the construction of ships in Pa
eific coast shipyards. He will be
accompanied by William Blackman,
a labor conciliator sent out by the
department of labor.
CARIBOU NOW
ON THE RUN
(Special to Tne OitlzeA)
DAWSON, Sept. 18. Members of
the crew of the steamer Alaska, ar
riving here today from Fairbanks,
report encountering a band of cari
bou numbering thousands crossing
the river a mile below Eagle. Sev
eral of the animals were lassoed
and caught. Immense herds of cari
bou are now moving toward the
south, and they have evidently chos
en the place where they were seen,
to cross the Yukon river.
DRAFT ARMY
ENTERS CAMPS
(Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sept. 18.
Over 300,000 men of the national
army, constituting forty-five per cent
of the quota under the first call,
will proceed to the sixteen army can
tonments tomorrow to begin training
to fight Germany. An advance guard
of five per cent iB already in the
camps, making one-half of the first
call to the colors already in the
service.
The question now arises as to
whether the number of men taken
in the first draft is sufficient to fill
up the national guard units which
will go to the front first.
It is considered likely that it may
be necessary to make a second call
of draft forces or train incomplete
divisions which should go to Prance
only at maximum war strength.
EDITORS FACE
TREASON CHARGE
(Associated Press)
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 18.—Charg
ed with treason, Louis Werner, chief
editor of the Philadelphia Tageblatt,
and Martin Darkow, managing edi
tor, were placed under ten thousand
dollars’ additional bonds today on the
discovery of evidence of treason
against the two defendants. They
were already under bail and awaiting
trial for a violation of the federal
‘espionage law.
KERENSKY CONFERS WITH
ARMY GENERALS ON FATE
OF GENERAL KORNILOFF
(Associated Press)
LONDON Sept. IX. Russia, hav
ing recovered in a measure from the
recent efforts of General Korniloff
and followers to create a revolt, is
preparing to make a firmer stand
against the Germans, according to
the summary issued by the Asso
ciated Press tonight Important re
forms are to be made at once to
strengthen the Russian army and to
restore the confidence of the sol
diers in their leaders. One of these
steps is to remove old and iucompe
tent generals from command and re
place them with younger men
Premier Kerensky himseli is on
the way to field headquarters to;- i
conference with military leaders and
will also see (leneral Korniloff, whose
fate may be decided in the forth
coming confen nee at field headquar
ters. The Russians are making some
progress already in driving tne (»‘*r
tnans back in the Riga sectot
The day was marked by intense
artillery and aerial activity on ihe
western front. For the second con
secutive day. the opposing airmen
were out in force and fought for su
premacy above the trenches.
In the Italian theatre, the Italians
spent the day repulsing Austrian
counter attacks. Rome reports that
all of these assaults were success
fully broken down without th ■ • ne
my making any progress.
WINDING UP
NAVIGATION
(Special tu Tlie Citizen)
DAWSON, Sept. 18. Owing to tin
fact that the end of the season of
river navigation in Interior Alaska is
now rapidly drawing nigh, the move
ments of the steamers are now at
trading considerable attention. Only
two more boats are due to leave heri
tor lower Yukon and Tanana ri\ • ■ r
points. They are the Alaska, due to
sail tomorrow for Fairbanks, and tin
Yukon, scheduled to sail on Septem
ber 24
The steamer Whitehorse left White
horse last night with 120 tons of
freight, according to word received
here. The freight includes eighteen
tons tor Fairbanks and sixteen for
Nenana. There are fifty-nine sacks
of mail for Fairbanks and sixteen
sacks for Nenana, as well as 1 If
sacks for lower Yukon river points
The passengers of the Whitehorse
for Fairbanks are O. F. Kreiger. hi
wife and child.
The steamer Dawson arrived hen
today from Whitehorse, and her
freight is now being transferred to
the Alaska, which leaves tomorrow
on her last trip for Fairbanks this
season. The freight shipment in
eludes 300 tons, mostly for Fail
banks and Nenana. There are ten
sacks of mail for Nenana and forty
eight for Fairbanks. J. W. Pratt is
the only passenger for Fairbanks,
and Miss Belle Spence the only pas
senger for Nenana.
The next and last boat leaving
Dawson following the departure of
the Alaska tomorrow will be tie
Yukon, sailing on September 24 for
Fairbanks. It is understood here,
howrever, that a number of lower
river boats will winter here and at
Whitehorse.
NATION GREETS
NEW REPUBLIC
(Associated Press)
BUENOS AIRES, Sept. IS. The re
public of Russia was formally rec
ognized by the president of Argentine
Republic today, the recognition Inn
ing been sent to Provisional Presi
dent Kerensky through the Russian
embassy. In recognizing the new
republic the president acted at tin
direction of congress.
INFANT MALADY
SWEEPS CHICAGO
(Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Sept. 18.—Chicago is
having one of the worst epidemics
of infantile paralysis ever experi
enced in this country. Sixteen new
cases of the malady were discovered
today, making a total of 110 cases
under observance. Twenty five addi
tional quarantine inspectors have
been employed by the city and fed
eral health boards to check tin
spread of the disease.
NO CONQUEST
SAYS GERMAN
PARTY LEADER
(A ssoeiated Press)
BERLIN, S»*pt. is. 11 *-it Erzberger,
leader of th*• Catholic party in the
reiclistag, speaking at a public occa
sion on Sunil a > declared: "The foun
dation of a true and lasting peace
must be one devoid of conquests of
any kind. To attempt to annex any
of the enemy territory which is at
present held by our troops would be
to invite .1 future struggle, probably
more gigantic than the present one.
"We are advancing .1 long stride
to such a peace, built upon the re
cent peace resolutions of the reieh
stag.”
(Associated Press)
WASHINGTON. D. C.. Sep. Is.
I11 response to the invitation from
Premier Lloyd George, several con
gressmen are planning to visit tie*
western ba.ttlefront in Europe it con
gress adjourns next month as plan
ned. Speaker Champ Clark will be
asked to head the delegation. It
will have to be a rather hurried
trip, as congress is to convene again
early in December.
The British premier has invited
congress to visit England and the
western front to get a first hand
impression of modern warfare.
WILSON MAY
SEE SERIES
(Associated Press)
CHICAGO, 111,, Sept. IS. Kan John
son, president of the American league,
has issued an invitation to President
Wilson to be in attendance at the
first game of the world series. It
has now been definitely determined
that the Chicago White Sox will be
the 1917 champion.- of the American
league, while the New York Giants
will defend the championship title
of the National league. Whether the
game to which President Wilson has
been invited will be played at New
York or Chicago has not yet been
decided.
MORF CAR RIOTS
IN SAN FRANCISCO
(Associated Proas)
SAN FRANCISCO, S -pt is. Riot
ing again broke out today as the
result of the strike on traction lines
of this city. Car windows were shat
tered by a mob of strikers and sev
eral non-union carmen were injured
in the melee. The crowd was final
ly dispersed by the police, who made
fourteen arrests.
RUSSIANS DRIVING BACK
GERMAN INVADERS AT RIGA
(Associated Press
PETROGRAD, Sept. 18.—Russians
are still on the offensive on the Riga
front and are continuing to press
back the invaders, wresting many
important strategic positions from
them. This new fighting spirit and
strengthened morale o' the troops
on this front is due to the reorgani
zation plan adopted by Premier Ke
rensky and the announcement that
incompetent officers are to be re
lieved of commands.
In recording continued progress
against the Germans, the war office
reports that the Russians have oc
cupied German positions southwest
of Ilapsal and have forced the Ten
tons from the Sadzen farm, south
of Sissfal.
Premier Kerensky, accompanied by
General Verkhovsky, minister of war
and Admiral Verdfski, minister of
marine, left for general headquar
ters ip the field today to direct the
offensive against the Germans in the
vicinity of Riga.
ROUMANIANS ON OFFENSIVE.
PETROGRAD, Sept. 18. An official
communication issued by the war of
fice tonight says that the Roumani
ans took the offensive yesterday in
the region of Varnitza, occupying
sections of fortified positions along
a wide front.

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