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The Alaska citizen. (Fairbanks, Alaska) 1910-1917, October 01, 1917, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060002/1917-10-01/ed-1/seq-6/

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AMERICAN BANK’S GROUND j
IN IDITAROD COUNTRY MAY
HELP OUT ITS DEPOSITORS
Con finning a report previously received in hairbanks, |
],|1 Smith, the well known Fairbanks and Iditarodl
• c-.' n an. toid a representative ot 1 lie Citizen last night'
t at tl e Moon, creek property of the detunct American
•.am. of Alaska will undoubtedly prove to be of value, and
probable in the \er\ near future at that. The report [>re ,
xajuS.v received ami published was to the eftect that good i
v lad been struck on Moore creek, in the Kuskokwim,
lUi.try, ami that the country on that creek held under i
irtai.e 11v the American Bank, might eventually produce
enough nnenue to pa\ off the creditors of the now de
mnct institution.
M". Smith stated last night that he is practically Cer-1
, :n tuat the ground iield by the bank contains pay. Hood J
j.;-. -]n.vts have been found on claims both above and below j
•’e ground in question, and the mining men of the lower
ri-.er untie who have investigated the proposition are
i..mulish of the opinion that the bank property contain ;
equally as good if not better prospects.
,\I’- Smith himseii is the owner of the claim which ad j
■.-•the ink propert\ on the downstream end. He pros
a 1 his ground during the past summer and says that
the results secured it is certain to turn out to be vain
V dredging property. In common with other mining
di tin 1 lit a rod region, lie therefore thinks that the
e pavstreak runs through the two claims owned by the
\merr. an Hank, in v iew ot the tact that even better pay
d an ia h ind on his ground has been located on the claim
v ' T adioin> the hank properly on the upper end.
The hank aUo owns a number of interests further up
e creek, but tliev are not believed to he very valuable. j
PERU SENDS ULTIMATUM I
DEMANDING THAT KAISER
MAKE FULL REPARATION
(Associated Press)
BIMa. Peru, Sept. 26.— The South American republic
lVru mav follow her sister, Argentine, in breaking oil
iipiomatic relations with Germany, as sentiment in this!
mmtrv is at w hite heat against the kaiser. 1 he cause for I
,'ieep resentment against Germany was the sinking ot
■ e Peruvian bark l.ortou inside Spanish water.- by a Ger
man submarine last Pebruary. Since that time the Pe
1 avian go\ eminent lias attempted to get an explanation from
Germany, but without any apparent satisfaction.
Argentine's action, following the revelation ot how her
rights i ad been ruthlessly trampled upon by Germany, has
led the Peruvian government to consider a similar course
As a result, the Peruvian government has instructed
1 er minister at the court in Berlin to present to the German
government a demand for satisfaction for the sinking of the
hark Imrton. Bight days is the time limit placed on the
ultimatum. If the demand is not granted by the end of
that period, diplomatic relations with the kaiser will be
roken and a declaration of war is likely to follow.
SIX DEAD IS TOLL OF
LATEST RAID ON LONDON
(Associated Press)
LONDON, Sept. 26.—Official figures given out by the
ar of 'e on last night's aerial attack on London place the
asuaiues at six dead and sixteen injured. All of the casual
-e.' took place in the southeastern outskirts of London.
The first group of raiders were driven back by anti
ainTaP an fire, and only two of the planes succeeded in
p'-uetrating me city’s defenses. Half an hour later a sec
ond group of air craft was driven off while approaching
1 ondon.
The report asserts that the area bombarded was inhabit
d chiefly by the poorer classes. There was no property
loss ex.ept the breaking of windows and slight damage
done to small frame houses.
JOE SMITH iS |
AT HOME AGAIN
Joseph H. Smith, proprietor of j
Smith's Gun Store and one of Fair- j
banks' best known merchants, al- j
‘hough he lias been located at Idita
rod for some time looking after that
end of his business, was an ar- !
rival in Fairbanks last night on a
launch iron Nenana, accompanied
.Mrs. Smith. He stated over the
- -nun after his arrival that
'n... his intention to remain in
. s and to establish his home
i1 Iditarod end of the busi
i ving been disposed of. Mr.
; .1. It. however, still holds extensive
.inin-t interests “in the Iditarod
on try.
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF
PARTNERSHIP
Notice is hereby given that the
St. Patrick Mining company has been
dissolved and neither of the under
signed will be liable for any indebt
edness of any nature of description
contracted by said former copart
nership and will not pay any bills
except those contracted by them
selves.
ALBERT BERNARD.
1 DICK THORSON.
CLOTHING IS
HIGH IN ROME
____
ROME, Sept. 10.- While women’s
clothes have doubled in price, the
wage paid dressmakers’ employees
still remains about 60 cents a day.
The exploitation of women workers
in Italy is being discussed in con
nection with the recent strike of
Paris midinettes. Rome’s two most
fashionable establishments, despite
ther war prices, continue to pay
their sewing gij’ls at this rate, with
three months’ layoff in summer. As
it is impossible for these girls and
young women to buy food on such
wages, many of them have turned
to work as house maids, where at
least they get their food.
One of the chief difficulties of
working women at present is to get
shoes, for which they now have to
pay $1 a pair for the quality that
before the war cost them |1.
CHURCH BELLS ARE
SEIZEiD IX G12RMANY
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands, Sept.
25.—About 700,000 church bells, des
tined for the smelter and ultimately
for conversion into munitions of
war, have been received by a big
bell foundry at Apoldo, in the Prus
sian province of Hanover.
TOBACCO TO
ENTER FRANCE
FREE OF DUTY
• Associate*! Press)
PARIS. Sept. 2(>. The
French government made an
announcement this afternoon j
that tobacco sent as gitts toj
American soldiers at the
front will be allowed to en
ter France duty tree. Ibis
is a considerable sacrifice on
the part of this country, a>
a heavy dutv is imposed upon
all imports ot tobacco, and
this is one of the big sources
of revenue. However, the
concession is gladly made as
a compliment to the Ameri
can soldiers who are to fight
side bv side with the soldiers
of the 1 Tench republic in the
war of democracy against au
tocracy.
GERMANS SEEK
LASTING PEACE
(Associated Press)
AMSTERDAM, Sept. 26 The Ger
man reply to the peace proposals
made by Pope Benedict has just
been formulated and declares that
the German people desire peace with
honor. Th reply states that the
people of Germany greet with spe
cial approval and sympathy the lead
ing idea in the pope's message in
which the pope expresses the con
viction that in the future military
power and arms be superceded by the
moral power of right.
The willingness of the government,
as the representative of the German
people, to accept the proposals proves
how earnestly Germany desires to
find a practical basis for a just and
lasting peace, according to the re
ply. The message also says that
Germany fully recognizes the peace
producing effect of a tribunal of
arbitration to settle international dif
ferences.
WANTS FREEDOM OF SEAS.
AMSTERDAM, Sept. 26.—Ger
many’s reply to the peace note of
the pope received here states that
Germany cherishes the hope that
the appeal will meet with success.
The kaiser’s reply says peace
*
would come as a result of the pope’s
peace proposals if belligerents would
enter into negotiations. The kaiser
sees in the proposals a suitable basis
for negotiations to establish a just
and lasting peace and hopes that
the nations opposing him may be
animated by the same idea and ad
mit that the future armament of
the world must be based on the rule
of international justice and legality.
The kaiser also hopes that the free
dom of the seas will be guaranteed
when the peace terms are made.
FOOD DICTATOR
WENT HUNGRY
AMSTERDAM.—Batocki, former
Get man food dictator, had consider
able difficulty in obtaining food for
himself during his fifteen months
in office, according to an intimate
article published in the Berlin Mit
tag Zietung. He tost thirty-five
pounds in weight and suffered equal
ly with other citizens for want of
nourishment and fuel.
Originally Batocki was a so-called
self-provider and as such had no
food cards. But food parcels sent
him from his country place repeated
ly were stolen. Of a parcel of butter
sent from the country he once re
ceived only the box, upon which
was written: “Hold out on that,
you blackguard." After this inci
dent the food dictator applied for
a set of ordinary citizen’s food cards.
Later on he became ill and his phy
sician ordered a diet containing
more fats, to which Batocki replied:
"I am glad it is no worse. It is
only the popular complaint—under
feeding.”
Batoeki was not overpopular with
his staff because, being a hard work
er himself, he insisted upon his sub
ordinates performing a correspond
ing number of tasks. He retired to
private life preparatory to Joining a
cavalry corps in which he holds
the rank of captain.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
Having this day bought my part
ner’s (Pete Peirson) interest in a
lay on No. 6 above Little Eldorado,
I will not be responsible for any
debts contracted by him after this
date.
Dated this 17th day of September,
1917.
1 SAM SAMPSON.
END OF NAVY
YARD STRIKE
NOT IN SIGHT
(Associated Press!
WASHINGTON. D. (A.
Sept. 26.—The Norfolk navv
vard is still tied up as the re
sult of the strike of its three
thousand mechanics last Mon
day. 'l'he men walked out
because they refused to work
at the present wages and be
cause they were impatient at
the delay of the navy depart
ment to formulate a new and
higher wage scale.
Today the navy depart
ment, through the heads of
the local unions, advised the
men to return to their work
pending negotiations to ad
just their differences. This
they have thus far refused to
do.
COAL MINERS
WANT LOWER
FREIGHT RATE
(Associated Press)
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, Sept.
26. Hearing of the case of the Stan
dard Coal company and other inde
pendent coal operators in Utah, in
which the independent coal operat
ors are seeking a reduction in rates
on coal from $5.75 to $4 a ton to
Pacific coast points, is scheduled to
be in Salt Lake City October 5. be
fore Attorney Examiner J. A. Mar
tin of the interstate commerce com
mission.
The coal operators are also seek
ing the removal of all differential
charges made by the railroads,
whereby Wyoming and other coal
companies are said to have an ad
vantage over Utah producers in sup
p'ying Idaho, Washington, Oregon,
Nebraska and Kansas, In addition,
the independent coal operators are
asking approximately $500,000 in
damages from the Denver & Rio
Grande railroad and the Union Pa
cific system for alleged discrimina
tion in the distribution of cars. The
damage suit was made a part of
the rate reduction suit in order that
both matters might be heard at the
same time by the attorney examiner.
The coal operators base their con
tention that the rates on coal from
Utah points to the Pacific coast
are too high on the comparison of
rates which exist in other sections
of the country where roads are ope
rated under similar conditions. In
their petition for a reduction of
rates the operators maintain that
with lower rates they will be able
to compete with Australian and Brit
ish Columbian coal companies.
The Union Pacific system main
tains a differential of 25 cents a ton
on coal shipped to Idaho and the
Pacific northwest at American Falls,
Idaho, in favor of Wyoming operat
ors. Differentials favoring Wyoming
operators are maintained at other
points farther east. The removal
of .ill such differential freight ratts
is sought.
The principal parties to the suit
are the Denver & Rio Grande rail
road, which is the road of origin
for all Utah coal, the Union Pacific
system, including the Oregon Short
Line and Oregon, Washington Rail
road and Navigation company, the
Western Pacific, the Southern Pa
cific, the Salt I>ake Route, and more
than 35 connection carriers in the
Rocky mountain and middle west
ern states.
SIAM IS NOW
CHINA’S ALLY
PEKIN, Sept. 25.—Announcement
of Siam’s declaration of war against
Germany is regarded by Chinese of
ficials, especially those familiar with
international politics in the Far East,
as a step which may well result in
the establishment of diplomatic rela
tions between China and Siam.
Siam has steadfastly refused to
exchange ministers with China. But
with these two nations as allies, they
will be thrown together in tne peace
conference in such a way that they
might be expected to agree to the
permanent establishment of diplo
matic relations.
China has at least two million
subjects in Siam. They are among
the leading business men of that
country. Consequently the Chinese
government is especially anxious to
have diplomatic relations between the
two governments.
Three Jack London etorlea for
$1.50. Inquire Citizen.
BRITISH BEGIN DRIVE !
TO ENVELOP BIG FRENCH
INDUSTRIAL CITY OF LILLE
(Associated Press 1
BRITISH FIELD HEADQUARTERS IN ERANCE.j
AND BELGIUM, Sept. 26.—That the enveloping of the;
important French manufacturing city of Lille is the ulti
mate objective of the big drive started by the British armies
became apparent today in the latest offensive tactics em
ployed by the British.
As its immediate objective, the new British offensive
is apparently aimed at driving in deeper the wedge already
forced into the German front at the Ypres-Meuin road and
northward beyond the Ypres-Roulers railway.
At the last reports this thrust had pushed the wedge
approximately a mile further into the enemy’s territory, and
the ground thus gained was well consolidated and is being
held tirmly against desperate counter attacks. The point of
the wedge has now almost reached the line extending di
rectly northward to the great French manufacturing city
ot I.ilie, whose envelopment is the one great object of the
Flanders attack.
The enlargement of the Ypres salient is likewise en
dangering the German line in the north extending to the
Belgian coast. The British apparently intend to concen
trate their offensive moves here and by pursuing this policy
force a German retirement on a wide front both north and
soutn.
TAKE STRONG POSITIONS.
BRITISH FIELD HEADQUARTERS IN BEL
GIL.M, Sept. 20.—A correspondent of the Associated Press
who was an eye witness of the big offensive conducted
by the British today reports that along the northern half
of the British battle line east of Ypres the British advanced
in numerous places for a distance of from 1,000 to 1,200
yards, taking positions that were the latest word in de
fensive works.
A report early in the day indicated that the British
are fighting along a line only a few hundred yards east
of Zonnebeke, showing that Haig’s men have made a not
able advance in that region.
British field headquarters are in receipt of news of
a terrific struggle along a front of 1,000 yards astride the
\ pres-Menin road. Here the Germans are throwing in
reserves in a desperate effort to stem the British advance. !
MANY PEOPLE
ARE LEAVING
S V CAPITAL
(Associated Press)
PETROGRAD, Sept. 26.
—Although there are no
signs of a panic among the
people of this city and all in
dications point to a return ot
confidence in the Kerensky
government, the partial evac
uation of Petrograd is pro
ceeding regardless of whether
or not the government is
transferred to Moscow.
Announcement that the
government would probably
move to the ancient capital
of Moscow to escape the
machinations of the undesir
able element was made a few
weeks ago. Since the col
lapse of the Korniloff revolt
this step has been abandoned,
but a partial evacuation of
the city is still proceeding in
spite of this.
CANDIDATES NAM ED
IN MASSACHUSETTS
(Associated Pr**ss)
BOSTON, Sept. 26.—Governor Mc
Call was nominated to succeed him
self on the Republican ticket, and
the Democrats nominated Frederick
Mansfield in the state wide primaries
today. Much interest was manifest
ed in the results, and both nomina
tions were keenly contested. A big
vote was recorded at the polls.
OSTEND BASE j
IS ATTACKED
BY NAVY GUNS
I
(Associated Press)
LONDON. Sept. 26.—An |
official statement issued by |
the admiralty tonight reports
that British naval forces yes
terday bombarded the tier
man naval base at Ostend,
on the coast of Belgium. At
the same time, an attack was |
made on the Teuton works by 1
a patrol of British flyers who
also directed the fire of the
British war ships and report
ed the damage done.
The British aerial patrol
over the British fleet brought
down two German aero
planes.
DEPUTY BRINGS
INSANE WOMAN
Deputy Marshal C. W. Vawter of
Tanana arrived in town yesterday
on the Hungry Kid's launch Flier
from Neuana. He brought Mrs. Mar
garet Peterson, who was convicted
of being an insane person at Ruby,
with him. Mrs. Vawter came with
her husband as matron. It is under
stood that the woman is to be taken
Outside by the marshal with the
next bunch of prisoners, leaving
about October 1.
U. S. TO HAVE
BIG MERCHANT
FLEET SHORTLY
« A>soctate<l Prpf»t»)
WASHINGTON. I) r . 26.
The United states shipping board
today announced that within little
more than a year the United States
will have an oceangoing merchant
fleet of over 1,600 ships, aggregat
ing 9,200,000 tons The board an
nounces that the present tonnage of
the United States merchant fleet is
3.500,000 tons. Of the present ton
nage, approximately 700,000 tons are
German and Austrian ships now un
der American operation.
MOOSE KILLED
NEAR OLNES
information received in town from
Dines yesterday afternoon was to
the effect that a bull moose was
killed along the railroad track within
a short distance of the town yes
terday morning. Tom Scott killed
h“ animal after it had stopped run
ning about a thousand feet from
where he first shot at it
Scott and Andrew Anderson saw
the animal on the hill across Dome
creek from the town itself. Secur
ing a gun, they immediately started
after it, but the rifle burst at the
first shot. They then returned to
town for another gun, and during
the time they were gone the moose
ran about a thousand feet. It was
there that the men found him on
their return and killed.
Having a span of 328 feet, the
new bridge across the Tiber at Rome
is the longest reinforced concrete
arch in the world.
FOR SALE Nine horses weighing
from 1,700 to 1,800 at $1,000 per
team, including harness; one odd
horse for $500. All sound, young
horses. Address VV. S. Amalong,
Ruby, Alaska. 26
.
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION.
Civil No. 2
i In Commissioner’s Court in and for
the Koyukuk Precinct, Territory of
Alaska, Division No. Four.
I O. R. Williams, Plaintiff,
vs.
The Koyukuk Mining and Develop
raent Company, a Corporation, and
E. J. Morgan, Gustave Fischer,
John Doe, Richard Roe and James
Doe, Defendants.
The President of the United States
of America, GREETING:
To the above named defendants:
You are hereby required to be and
i appear in the Commissioner’s Court,
[Koyukuk Precinct, Territory of Al
aska, Fourth Division, at Wiseman
therein, within twenty days after the
date of the last publication of this
summons, and answer the Complaint
of the above named plaintiff, in the
above entitled cause and court and
unless you so appear and answer,
j the plaintiff herein will take judg
ment against you for the amount
! demanded in plaintiff’s complaint,
| now on file in this Court, to-wit:
The sum of Eight hundred and nine
dollars and fifty cents, together with
| costs and disbursements of action.
The said sum of eight hundred and
nine dollars and fifty cents is al
leged in plaintiff’s complaint to be
! due for labor performed by one A.
j G. Brackett, the account of which
has been duly sold, assigned and
! transferred to plaintiff herein.
This summons is published and
| service thereof made by publication
under and pursuant to an order of
I said Court, made and entered in said
Court on the 16th day of April, 1917,
and the date of the first publication
will be and is October 1, 1917, and
the date of the last publication is
and will be November 5, 1917.
(Seal)
Witness the Honorable Thomas B.
Wright, Judge of said Court this
30th day of August, 1917.
THOMAS B. WRIGHT,
Commissioner and ex-olhcio Justice
of the Peace.
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