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The Eskimo bulletin. [volume] (Cape Prince of Wales [i.e. Wales], Alaska) 1893-1902, May 01, 1902, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060045/1902-05-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ESKIMO BULLET
THE ONLY YEARLY IN THE WORLD.
VOL.V7 CAl’E IMUXCii: oirWALEsTALASKT^~MAY”li)0i’
OVER THE ICE
FROM ASIA.
Special to the Bulletin.
East Cape, Siberia, Mar. 15, 11)03
—A party of ton Russian prospectors
were lumietl from u schooner at Indian
Point in October. They are now pros
pecting and staking the region hi that
vicinity.
An iudiau Point nativo, while seal
ing recently, discovered two strange
men hiding among the lco hummocks.
Fearing from their movements that
they were trying to kill him, he open
ed fire upon them aud killed one. The
other man escaped. They are suppos
ed to be from the American side.
BISMARK
MURDERED !
BY A BOY.
Big Piomedes Island, (Russian). Mar.
24. - Bistuark, the first white man who
has ever attempted to winter on tho
islands, was shot today by Sa-od-le-uk,
a thirteen year-old boy.
llismark had lived with his “wom
an’s” family all winter, but her widow
ed mother, We-a-kl-se-uk, had become
so disagreeable, that ho severed bis
domestic ties, and began to move into
another house. He had succeeded lu
moving about half of his goods, when
tho hoy, at the Instigation of his moth
er, surprised him by firing at him with
a rifle. His first shot took affect in
Bismurk’s arm, and tho second in his
leg, but the third, struck him in the
head, killing him instantly.
The woman and her son, are con
demned by the natives. They say 8a
ed-lo-uk has been a bad boy, and do
Hervos to bo killed.
llismark was a boat-stoarer from
the steam whaler, "Wm. Buyless”. He
landed here iu October with a small
outfit of flour, sugar, etc, and a still.
But his still was not a success. From
tho natives, he procured another, with
which ho has been successful In dis
tilling a crude alcohol from fermented
flour, sugar, and molasses. With this
*‘toug-ok,” and his “tnule goods”, he
hud succeeded In accumulating quite a
quantity of ivory, furs, and boota
Some think that the prospect of ih>s
sesHlng theno nicy have Influenced
the woman to p’ci his murder.
llismark was a kind ami generous
man, and well liked by the natives.
DRIFTED |
OUT TO SEA.
Na-tax-ite Ninety-six
Hours Without i
Food. j
.
Hia Own Story,
On January 25) th., Ne-tax-lte, a
young seal hunter was curried out to ;
sou by an easterly wind. Ah he was
known to have got Into the wnter j
while trvlng to get to tho shore lee, j
his people and relatives thought the j
elianers for his saving himself wore i
decidedly against him. Adrift on tho i
ice with wet clothing ami no food, they 1
knew that he would freeze to death !
in a few hours should tho wind swing i
to the north. Fortunately for him the J
oast wind held on, and the temperature |
was 18 above zero during the night I
During the next few days tho weather j
was thick and disagreeable, and the
wind off shore. Tho people thought
tho current would carry him north of
the Dlornedes Islands. At his home be
was mourned for, as one dead.
l ive weeks later, when he put in !
his appearance at tho mission, it seem
ed as though one hud returned from tho
dead. But seeing that a Diomedes
Eskimo accompanied him, tho manner
of his rescue was evident.
This Is his story as given to the Bul
let! n
“When I arose about daylight, Jan.
20 th, I found a gentle south east wiud
blowing. The drifting floes were
grinding against tho shore ice, so my
brother and I concluded to take a
chance on It with the other people
who were already going towards it.
Without a bite of breakfast, I throw
my rifle, seal spear, snow shoes, and
‘*ok-ha-nuk'\ — seal skin hunting
bag containing harness for dragging
seal, thong forswear, floating grapple
and gut wator-coat, - on my back, took
one hand-full of dried upplos (raw) for
lunch, and started. I wore short seal
water boots, door leg socks, und niits,
light suit of under wear, seal skin
pantaloons, two ar - te - gas, — one
fawn and the other muskrat, — and
a knit cap.
The shore-ice, was about thruo
miles wldo. Reaching tho edge of it,
wo had no trouble In getting on the
floating fields that wore drifting
northward at tiro rate of two miles per
hour.
Continued on page 3.
Affpr
Muk i uk tuk
With An Ax.
A Capo Espenberg naive by tho
name i f Muk-i-uk-tuk i> in t*<wn. Ho
has an ugly gash out over his riidit eye
and in tolling his tali* of woo to ovoiy
ono bo moots. Ho assort- that ono of
tho white men wintorii g near Esp*-u
berg i n tho stranded ba. go "Nome Ci
ty”, stole a fox from his trap. Mooting
this white it.an, whenciming to tho
Capo, lie demanded his fox skin. This
accusation so omuged tho white man,
that ho [lunched him iu the face with
an ax, cutting a gash above his eye.
He then drew hack the ax. t.nd was in
tho act of striking him in the face with
the edge of it, when Muk-i - uk - tuk
grabbed the handle with both hands
and twisted it oul of his grasp. He
seems to think that his life was in
great danger. “The man with an u\’
has not been heard from.
Battle with
Walrus.
In-ed-leet Island, (‘‘Small l)lom«*les”)
Nov. Cth., On Nov. 1st., a large
herd of walrus took refuge on tho ta
liind near the village. After they had
climb'd up the steep hill-sides, the
people got betweeu them and the sea
and began a battle which lusted two
days, and result**! iu tho slaughter of
almost the entire herd. Feanug the
report of guns-would stampede them,
ouly lancos were used. Am the herd
was composed principally of large hull
walrus, many of the struggles were
vory exciting, but resulted in no cas
ualties to the natives. A few walrus
which escaped to the sea were parmted
In skin bouts, and killed. No attempt
will bo made to dry the skins at this
season of tho year. They will be used
for food nlong with the meat. This
“big catch” at the close of naviga
tion, will insure the peoplo of both
islands against “starving times” dur
ing tho long winter months.
First Whale
Killed.
Tlio first whale of the season was
harpooned to-day, Muy, 11, by W'e-u
ho-na’s canoe. It ’is a calf. - about HO
feet long. The natives punctured it
with 4 Harpoons, to each of which
W’ero attached 0 soul pokes, when A1
uro-suk gave it the death-thrust with
his lance

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