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The Winslow mail. (Winslow, Ariz.) 1893-1926, May 02, 1908, Image 4

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060765/1908-05-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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PUBLISHED SATURDAYS
SL'BSCKIPriON, Two Dollars pkk Ykak.
Enteied in the i’ostoffiee at Winslow as
second class matter.
LLOYD C. HENNING.
Editor and Proprietor,
All subscriptions payable in advance.
Eveiy subscriber’s paper will be stopped at
expiration of subscription.
Publication Office: Mail Building.
DAILY HELPS.
A pinch of salt improves cakes, can
dies and almost eve.ything that is
cooked.
Salt on the fimro s '-hm cleaning
meat, fowls and ' s'.i v.LI ;> event the
hands from slippim;.
Starch made with s a >y water pie
vents the irons from stiukln; and
•gives a better gloss to the linen.
If a teaspoonful of vine a" is added
to the water in which fish is to te
washed a most delicious flavor will
be imparted to it.
Cold baked potatoes, sliced thin,
then put in a baking dish with salt,
pepper, butter and milk, make a better
scallop than raw potatoes.
Food articles that are damp should
never be left in ordinary paper. Paper
is made of wood pulp, rags, glue,' lime,
and similar substances intermixed
with chemicals. When damp, it
should not be allowed to come in
contact with things that are to be
eaten.
The small stone crocks used by
many for holding butter should al
ways be well washed and freshened
before being refilled. The best way
to freshen them is. after washing, to
fill them with boiling ammonia or
borax water, allowing a teaspoonful
of ammonia to a quart of water. Let
the water remain all day and then
fill the crock with sweet milk and let
it stand over night.
TO COOK BRAISED STEAK.
Vegetables and Meat Used Together
For This Dish.
Have about two pounds of steak cut
very thick; melt one ounty of butter
or dripping in a small stewpan. then
put in a layer of mixed vegetables,
carrot, turnip, onions, etc., cleaned
and sliced, making a layer of about
three-quarters of an inch deep; lay
in a bunch of herbs, and on all this
arrange the meat, cover down the
pan and fry its contents for about 12
or 15 minutes, only shaking It occa
sionally to prevent this burning: now
pour in just enough stock or water to
reach to the bottom of the meat, cover
this with a piece of white paper brush
ed over with butter or dripping, then
cover down the pan, and let the meat
simmer very gently till it Is done,
basting the meat occasionally. The
time of cooking varies with the kind
and quality of the meat; for two
pounds of fillet or rump steak I*4 to
1% hours is about the time Serve
the meat on a hot dish surrounded by
the vegetables and gravy, which should
be thickened with corn flour.
Meet Universal Appreciation.
Talents of even the highest order
are criticised. But the simple little
home graces that make a woman
sweet and lovable are seldom —if ever
—subjected to adverse comment.—Chi
cago Record-Herald.
Newton Newkirk, the humorist of
the Boston Post, has given racy read
ing to the brethren in his “Recollec
tions of a Gold-Cure Graduate.”
There’s a laugh in every line of it
and it has many humorous illustra
tions. —Atlanta Constitution.
Attractive Bead Work.
Much is reproduced nowadays in
bead work imitative of that done a
century ago, when all such industries
were considered accomplishments,
and the individual tastes of the belles
of that day were shown in their hand
iwork. Bead purses, reticules, bags of
all descriptions and card cases were
then made in them, the fashion now
not only including these, but also belt
buckles, in which eithe" fruit or flower
is set with a filigree framing of cut
steel beads. Fans for all occasions
are shown, those with wrought ivory
sticks and pailletted gauze particular
ly attractive, and in some the sticks
are delicately inlaid with tracings of
steel. Such a fan is useful with any
evening costume, for there is no color
to conflict with the shade of the
frock, and the little spangles catch the
light in a fascinating way.
Immune,
Impecunious Bill —There’s one thing
chat isn’t worrying me.
Friend —What’s that?
Bill —The proposed tax on incomes.
—Detroit Free Press.
Disdain.
Stella —Does she look at him
through rose colored glasses?
Bella —No, auto goggles—N. Y. Sun.
“Jayhawkers of ’49”
The DEATH VALLEY MAGA
ZINE, which is publishing the
life of Death Valley Scotty, will
begin the story of the “Jayhaw
kers of ’49” in its May number.
The “Jayhawkers” discovered
and gave Death Valley its name.
The story will be written bv John
B. Colton, one of the survivors,
who is now 75 years of age. He
was the youngest member of the
party, being 16 years old at the
time.
April 5, 1849, the party, con
i sisting of 36 members, organized
;at Galesburg, Ills, under the
name of “Jayhawkers,” and
started to the gold fields of Cali
jfomia. They were on toot the
last 52 days of the trip, having
[ abanotied the wagons and butch-
I ered their oxen for food.
There are four survivors, one a
woman aged 94 years, who car
j ried a child upon her back and
kept in line while the strong men
fell dead or went insane upon the
i trail.
All of the story will be told for
the first time, the humorous as
well as the pathetic. Publishers
have sought it for 50 years, but
the survivors have now deemed
it fit and proper to give it to the
DEATH VALLEY MAGAZINE.
No pioneer or lover of American
history can aford to miss it.
The subscription price of the
magazine is $1 .a year. Every
issue contains stories and pic
tures ot the desert worth the
price.
The publishers are also giving
five shares of stock in the Death
Valley Quartz & Placer Mining
Company as a premium. The
stock is of the par value off 1 per
share
Rush your orders or write for
particulars.
DEATH VALLEY PUB. CO.,
Rhyolite, Nevada.
European Flan. Rates from 50c to $1 Per
Day Sample Room, Bar and Restaurant in
Connection
Navajo County Bank
Commenced Business July 21st, 1900.
DEPOSITS:
Dec. 23d, 1902
$93,628.33
Dec. 23d, 1904
$101,334.54
December 23d, 1905
$147,199.09
December 23d, 1906
$220,980.00
* f The Proof of Good Service is Constant Growth”
Resources Jan’y Ist, 1907, $260,000.00
| ~£(muzfxuii'Ct:r ct tfwrfut.
ThrduM llie slcv. made m
'Silk. deil/pi and youll
2||g|\ fiave amtforfmd satiAfac
wm lion all taz latte
Preston B. Keith Shoe Co., Makers, Brockton, Mass.
Sold o rv
By ureaves & Dye
Oyster Salad.
For oyster salad boil one quart of
oysters in their own liquor, skim
well, and drain. Add three table
spoonfuls of vinegar, one of oil, one of
lemon juice, and season to taste. Put
In the refrigerator for two hours. Use
the tenderest part of a head of cel
ery, cut into small pieces, of which
there should be about a pint. Have
your celery very cold and crisp, and
with it mix the oysters and a quarter
of a cupful of mayonnaise, garnish
with celery tips and slices of lemon.
Laces That Will Not Wash.
Laces that are embroidered with
silk and colors, tinsel or gold and sil
, ver should be spread out smoothly on
a clean piece of white cloth and
| cleaned carefully with a soft brush
dipped in spirits of wine.
If silk lace is much discolored it
should be soaked in hot milk for two
I or three hours before washing.
Honiton lace shomd not be ironed.
Put it under a weight on clean white
1 paper after being washed. Blotting
paper will give the best results.

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