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The Winslow mail. (Winslow, Ariz.) 1893-1926, April 09, 1926, Image 9

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060765/1926-04-09/ed-1/seq-9/

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FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 1926
NAVAJOS ARE FIRST
AMERICAN ARTISTS
American art and handicraft, as
a rule, are subject to changes dur
ing the centuries, in some cases
from generation to generation. The
exception that proves the rule is
the handicraft of the Navajo In
dians in the desert country of
northern New Mexico and Arizona.
There the methods of many cen
turies ago are still employed in the
manufacture of the beautiful Nav
ajo blankets, or what should more
properly be called Navajo prayer
rugs.
Religious customs and the ven
eration of the Indians for the leg
ends and habits of their ancesters
preclude any innovations in the
mode of manufacture. Indeed, it
would be difficult to conceive any
improvement, at least any which
could add to beauty, charm or ser
viceability. Moreover, no mechani
cal loom has ever been devised to
weave a Navajo rug.
The rugs are woven by the
sqi T.ws of the tribe. The looms
are primitive affairs, consisting of
WINSLOW FEED and SALES STABLES
Dealers in
HAT GRAIN WOOD and COAL
Phone 170-A CHAS. DAZE, Proprietor 115 Kinsley
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY
ABSTRACTS & TITLES
Navajo-Apache
Abstract and Title Co.
Twenty-four Hours Service
Abstract of Title, Certificates of
Title, Title Insurance
Holbrook Arizona
ATTORNEYS
Thorwald Larson
LAWYER
Practice in State and Federal
Courts
Holbrook Arizona
Sweeney & La Prade
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
General Practice in all Courts
Telephone 48 Winslow, Arizona
Sapp and McLaughlin
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Holbrook Arizona
Charles D. McCauley
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 10, Old Elks Building
PHONE 434
Phil. A. Sawyer
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Holbrook and Winslow
Winslow Office:
J2IJ4 Kinsley Ave. Phone 124
CAFES
Fritz’s Case
“Next to home, this is the best
place to eat”
106 West First Street
CHIROPRACTOR
R. VERNON PRICE
Chiropractor
Palmer Graduate
Suite No. 6 Elks Building
Phone 228
DENTISTS
E. C. Gilpin, D. D. S.
DENTIST
X-Ray Laboratory
Phone 183 Elks Bldg.
CLEANING & PRESSING
Winslow Cleaning
Works
J. R. FUTCH, Prop.
Guaranteed Cleaning by the
DeLaral Process
102 East First Street
FEED AND FUEL
Cresswell Transfer Co.
WOOD AND COAL
HAY GRAIN
PHONE 118
FURNITURE
Standard Furniture Co.
V. H. Driver M. L. Davis
New and Used Household
Furniture
110 W. First St. Phone 500
M. L. Davis
only two stout poles stretched be
tween two of the very infrequent
cottonwood trees along the arroyos
or dry rivers of the desert. The
wool is sheared from the backs of
the rugged mountain sheep as need
ed. White and black are natural
colors of the wool; crimson, brown
and orange are secured from dyes
distilled from cactus plants and
roots; yellow is mined from the
ochre deposits of the Painted Des
ert. These are the principal colors
used.
Months are consumed iu the mak
ing of a single rug. The weaver
has been trained from babyhood in
the craft and lore of her ancestors,
for skill and understanding of the
legends of the tribe contribute to
the making of the design. Every
detail is carried in the mind of the
weaver and is executed as the work
progresses. No alterations or cor
rections can be made after the work
is started. There is no pattern or
blue print to guide the weaver, who
sits patiently before her loom add
ing strand upon strand to the whole
until her product symbolically por
trays an idea or thought, with a
theme taken from the legends of
the earth, the nation, the future,
HOTELS
Hotel Navajo
114 West First Street
Phone 180
Steam heat, hot and cold water in
every room
Winslow Hotel
JAMES M. HICKEY, Prop.
Cor. 2nd and Williamson
“A Good Family Hotel”
Brandt Hotel
Mrs. A. C. Rennix
Hot and Cold Running Water
All Outside Rooms
Corner Kinsley Ave. and Second St.
Over Winslow Drug Phone 210
INDIAN CURIOS
R. M. Bruchman
Indian Trader
Indian Rugs, Pottery
and Curios
Winslow, Arizona
LUMBER
Olds Bros. Lumber Co.
Builders and Contractors
Phone 43
300 Kinsley Avenue
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION
Arturo L. Maxemin
VIOLIN TEACHER
Music Furnished for Alt Occasions
513 Kinsley Avenue
Winslow
INSTRUCTIONS ON
PIANO
(One Hour Lesson)
Stifdio $ .75'
Pupils Home „ SI.OO
DOROTHY HALE
215 East Elm Street
OSTEOPATH
Dr. Harriet I. Johnson
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
Treats Acute and Chronic Diseases
Diseases of Women a Specialty
Office 220 Kinsley Avenue
Telephone 67
PLUMBING & HEATING
Winslow Plumbing &
Heating Co.
W. T. BUTLER, Prop.
115 Kinsley Avenue
Office Phone 51 Home Phone 389
SHOE REPAIRING
City Electric Shoe Shop
F. MAZZA, Prop.
EXPERT SHOE REPAIRS
All Work Guaranteed
110 Kinsley Ave.
TAILOR
“BILI/^rHARA
“Gloverized Cleaner
Cleaning Pressing
WATCH REPAIRING
Winslow Jewelry Co.
“Let your watch troubles be ours”
Guaranteed Watch and Clock
Repair
110 Kinsley Ave.
Arizona
Arizona
Arizona
the past or the beginning of time.
To one accustomed to interpret the
symbols, the rug tells a complete
story. The colors in the predomin
ance contain a definite message.
The designs are symbolical of na
tural phenomena, for instance the
jagged line seen in so many rugs
relate to the lightning and gener
ally is incorporated in a story of
the often-prayed for rain.
It is generally believed that no
two Navajo rugs have ever been
woven alike. This is true, with the
exception that sometimes a weaver
will duplicate one of the sand paint
ings of the Navajos. Within the
last few days I saw on a collector’s
floor, three rugs, in complicated
border, field and figures exactly
like three rugs printed in colors
in the book of George Wharton
James, published twenty or more
years ago. These are very rare,
however, and find their way very
infrequently into the hands of
traders.
The weaver, usually, like the
author or composer, awaits an in
spiration. Both sides of a Navajo
rug are identical, however, for the
wool and warp are strands of long
fibre wool, and the strands are bat
tened down hard, one upon another,
with a heavy flat slab of wood.
Each thread, as inserted in place,
is put there to stay forever.
The supply of Navajo rugs is de
creasing noticeably each year. Th&
popularity of these rugs for inter
ior decorations, sun rooms and
porches in the homes of the people
of the east, is resulting in the
stocks of traders on the reserva
tions becoming rapidly depleted.
The movement of the younger In
dians to adopt the employment of
white people, with the result that
few weavers are being trained, is
also bringing close the time when
the Navajo will be classed with the
ancient Persian tapestries, prized
possessions of the collector, and a
thing of wonder.
o
SAFE CLOSED FOR 10
YEARS IS BLOWN BY
TOMBSTONE YEGGS
TOMBSTONE For the first
time in ten years a safe in Pa
quin’s pool hall in this city was
opened Tuesday morning when un
known parties filled it full of nitro
glycerin and blew the door off and
into the pool hall bar.
The safe, although located di
rectly underneath the cash register
which had been left open, had not
been used for more than ten years
and had been empty during the en
tire period.
Entrance into the building was
made through a rear door by cut
ting the screen and breaking thru
a beaver board which had been
used to replace the glass in the
door. Although members of the
local sheriff’s force investigated
the job and took some fingerprints,
no trace of the burglars has been
found. '
o
PROBATION OFFICER
OF COCONINO WINS
FLAFSTAFF—Superior Judge J.
E. Crawford found for the plain
tiff in the case of J. E. Jackson vs.
the board of supervisors of Coco
nino county for collection of salary
as truancy officer. The supervisors
endeavored to remove Jackson from
office by cutting off his salary, it
was charged.
o
STANDARD LUMBER MILL WILL
BE REBUILT SAiS MANAGER
John Zalaha, manager of the
Standard Lumber Company was a
visitor in Holbrook during the week
Whiie in town, Mr. ZalaUa stated
that plans were under way for the
rebuilding of the Standard lum
ber mills which were destroyed by
fire recently. He thought it would
require about ninety days for the
reconstruction of the mill, when his
company will resume operations at
Standard. —Holbrook Tribune.
—o-
EXPLOSION OF OIL RAZES TWO
HOUSES AT FLORENCE RANCH
FLORENCE—The explosion of a
cook stove in which coal oil had
been poured resulted in the razing
of two homes at the Tweedy ranch
15 miles southwest of Florence,
Wednesday night. Two families
were left almost destitute by the
tragedy.
—o
CHANGE OF VENUE TO BE
SOUGHT IN V. A. MASSIF CASE
DENVER—A change of venue
will be sought in a motion to be
filed in district court in Jefferson
county for Virgil A. Massie, charg
ed with the murder on February 1,
last, of his wife, Katherine Rosen
baum Massie, it was announced.
Attorneys for Massie will also
make an effort to have district at
torney Joel Stone removed as pros
ecutor of the case because of "un
due personal interest.”
He was arrested, with Mrs. Irene
Divelbess, wife of the sheriff of
Navajo county, Arizona, following
a month’s investigation into the
mysterious circumstances sur
rounding his wife’s death. She was
found in bed dead, with Massie
lying along side the body in a
stupor.
o—
WILLIAMS PROPOSES
PAYING OF AVENUE
WILLIAMS Williams proposes
paving of Bill W’illiams avenue
from the Arizona Bank corner
westward to the city limits at an
estimated cost of $26,000, $18,200 of
which will be furnished by the gov
ernment.
o—
ARIZONA LAMB CROP TO
REACH 35,000 JUNE 1
Arizona will furnish approxi
mately 25,000 early lambs by March
15 and about 10,000 early range
lambs by June 1, according to a
report, of the United States Divi
sion of Corps and Livestock esti
mates.
THE WINSLOW MAIL
Engineers For The San
Carlos Bam Approved
PHOENIX William Campbell
Langfitt of Flushing, New York, and
Lansing Hoskins Beach of Cincin
nati, Ohio, two internationally
known engineering experts on riv
er and harbor improvements, and
A. J. Wylie of Boise, Idaho, a fore
most irrigation engineer, have been
approved by the United State In
terior Department as consulting
engineers to pass on the plans and
specifications for the construction
of the Coolidge dam at San Car
los in the Gila River in the Flor
ence-Casa Grande valley.
o—
Plan Electric Line From
Douglas To Tombstone
DOUGLAS—PIans of the Arizona
Edison company indicate the early
construction of an electric service
line from Douglas to Tombstone. It
is to lead through Gleeson and oth
er towns and through an agricul
tural district that now is calling
for electric power for the pumping
of water for irrigation.
o
INDIAN SHOT, TWO
HELD IN MARICOPA
PHOENIX—Shot down in a la
bor camp at midnight last Satur
day night, Jesus Valenzuela, 35, an
Indian laborer employed at Litch
field, 20 miles west of here, is in
a local hospital with a probably
fatal bullet wound.
Santiago Victorano and Victor C.
Joaquin are held in the Maricopa
county jail in connection with the
shooting. John Morris, foreman of
the work camp, said the gun play
resulted from the importation of
bootleg whiskey.
I BAKES
BETTER j
H PAINTS* VARNISHES ft)
I
j! PAINT Your' I
)j KITCHEN FLOOR J
tV Brighten your kitchen floor A
II with LOWE BROTHERS M
'fl HARD DRYING FLOOR )
psi PAINT. It dries quickly A
f3to a tough enamel-like fin- V
H ish and stands the hard J
ilj scuffingandrepeatedclean- A
18 ing that kitchen floors get. V
fl HARD DRYING FLOOR )
PAINT is economical be I|
is cause it spreads far and is l
y very durable. I
jl * Good also for kitchen walls f{
’m and woodwork. \
jl Let us show you color cards ((
tl OLDS BROTHERS A
jl LUMBER COMPANY II
ft Winslow, Arizona I
FOR SALE
A real bargain for the next
thirty days only.
At 418 West Aspinwall
A REAL HOME
4 Rooms and sleeping porch,
all new and modern, and
with all improvements that
make a house a “home,” —
trees, flowers, etc.
ON THE MARKET FOR
THIRTY DAYS ONLY
Phone 153
Or Call 40S West Aspinwall
Herrington Promoted,
Now Manager of Three
Electric Light Plants
FLAGSTAFF—George T. Her
rington of this city at a recent con
ference of the officials of Day &
Zimmerman of Philadelphia and the
managers of the 40 city electric
light and power companies they
own was promoted from manager
of the Flagstaff Electric Light Co.,
Only a company such as
“Union Oil of Califor
- /
nia” can make a motor
fuel as good as—
Union Gasoline
Non-detonating
Union Gasoline provides, and always
has provided to Western motorists, the
non-detonating feature which supplies full
power to the pistons throughout their
entire stroke and eliminates all explosive
“knocking ” or < 6 pinging" on the hills or in
heavy pulling —a quality for which Eastern
motorists are now buying “special gaso
lines” and paying 3 cents per gallon in
excess of usual prices for them. Yet Union
costs no more than other high grade fuels.
Always use Aristo Motor Oil with non
detonatifig Union Gasoline because this »
combination minimizes carbon to the ex- fiT
tent that motors in good condition are
run for several years without it.
Union Oil Company .
of Arizona v
“TO SERVE YOU”
in iifii pi pi i i im?iin|ipjM n nr—rnunT - nr - i"n r —nr rmm
> 4
m
Os and for
the People
X===XOX=l
PUBLIC UTILITIES are instruments of and
for the people—for their comfort and con
venience, not merely money-making agen
cies for their owners. They are a vital
element in our home, business and social life.
In pleasure and play, sleeping or awake,
working and eating, in sickness and in health,
some important part is played by electric light
and electric power.
Town and city growth and expansion are
dependent upon the growth and expansion of
those organizations which provide us with these
wonderful but hardly thought-of services.
Hence it is natural that every individual is
taking a keener interest in Public Utilities and
according them something more than critical at
tention.
'' -i ■" ■■
Arizona Electric Power Co.
“At Your Service” i
to district manager for the corpora- ]
tion of the Flagstaff, Winslow and j
Holbrook plants, succeeding Claude j
Quebedeaux of Winslow, who had j
been district manager since the ■
merger last summer.
Mr. Quebedeaux, who was also j
at the Chicago conference, resigned I
there, asking that it become effec- j
tive'not later than May 1 and soon- j
er if possible. Mr. Quebedeaux and
his brother, Tom Quebedeaux, re- I
PAGE NINE
cently bought an ice manufactur
ing plant at Albuquerque and
Claude, who is manager, is anxious
to get there as soon as possible.
The general office for this dis
trict will be in Flagstaff, with Mr.
Herrington manager, and Captain
G. E. Dameswood auditor. Mr. Her
rington, while most of his time will
be spent here, will have to make
regular trips to Winslow and Hol
brook.

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