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The Winslow mail. (Winslow, Ariz.) 1893-1926, December 27, 1926, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060765/1926-12-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
The Winslow Mail
GIRAGI BROTHERS, Owners and Publishers
Entered as second-class matter at the postoffice of Winslow, Arizona,
under act of Congress, March 1. 1879
Jfficial Paper of Winslow and the Arizona Live Stock Sanitary Board
Any erroneous reflection upon the standing, character or reputation of
any person, firm or corporation, which may appear in the columns of
THE MAIL, will be gladly corrected upon its being brought to the
attention of the management.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Payable in Advance
Three Months , SI.OO
Six Months .*. $1.75
One Year . $3.00
No Subscription accepted for less than three months
HARD TO KEEP FROM BOOSTING
“Boosterism” has been the target in recent years for
so many wisecracks from those admittedly sophisticated and
learned to the point of boredom that the small-town citizen
with a pride in his native city almost fears to sing its praises.
But in Winslow’s case, how can a home-town booster
keep silent?
The homely philosophy that a city cannot stand still,
that it must either go forward or backward, finds Winslow
and its boosters in a position to assert without fear that
this city is not in the backward class.
Not alone for the new buildings which have gone up in
the past few months, nor for the improvements in older es
tablishments is this claim justified. A surer sign of Wins
low’s progress, its prosperity, and its economic importance
in Northern Arizona is the avidity with which firms are
seeking for a location here.
These firms have passed the stage of an ordinarily suc
cessful business; they have expanded and prospered, and
they are constantly on the lookout for paying locations in
prospering cities.
A part of their energy and income is used in furnish
ing a department that keeps in constant touch with the re
tail market, and whenever this department locates a logical
site for a new store, it is a sure thing that they have made
an exhaustive study of the conditions surrounding that pros
pective location before they attempt to enter it. The city
and its citizens must be properous, progressive and alert,
and the city’s future must be bright.
With all the moving, the new building and expansion,
not one Winslow business house has been left standing idle
for more than a few days; usually only long enough, in fact,
for the new tenant to “clean house” or to make improve
ments.
With one exception, these locations have been filled by
business firms that have operated here for some time, and
in every case, tfye ones who got leases on the building were
only an hour or so ahead of an outside leaser.
In the past few days it has been reported,, and authen
tically, that at least three nationally known firms are on the
lookout for business locations in Winslow'.
Winslow’s financial strength has been sapped for years
by mail-order leeches that sell cheap goods at cheap
prices, that offer no opportunity for exchange, for making
good on mis-statements, without miles of red tape and weeks
of argument.
New business should be welcomed. It means Winslow
money in circulation in Winslow.
LIFE IS AN EXPERIMENT
Living is an experiment. We don’t have to go back
more than a hundred years in our own history to prove
this. There always will be new ways, new ideas, new val
ues, new attitudes. Some will be gpod for most of us; some
only for groups and individuals here and there. There is
no end; we shall change always, everywhere, each one of
us. And to demand finality and uniformity is to acknowl
edge failure and futility. Our ancestors used vastly differ
ent tools in their work, different ways of travel, had a dif
ferent and less detailed knowledge, and a different view of
life. With out new science and our new machines, and our
new knowledge of the nature of the world, some also a new,
expectation of life, new values, new ideals and new plans.
All values are human, dependent on the nature of man
and his age-old inherited make-up. As he finds life, so he
makes his values, and as he changes, so they will change.
The greatest moral obligation is to he true to one’s self and
qne’s neighbor. Self respect is the basis of respect for oth
ers. He who takes the right to think for himself, must yield
that same right to others. That is what has made civiliza
tion what it is and will make it what it will be in the years
to come. Life is an experiment. ...
.o
“MOON FARMING”
After thorough investigation the Department of Ag
riculture declares that planting, sowing, reaping, breeding,
butchering or other farm activities during any phase of
the moon, is pure moonshine. The custom has been trac
ed back to the age of mysticism and superstitution, but it
has absolutely no support from any scientific point of view'.
The department concludes that the only good it ever did
was through the systematizing of farm work, fixing a time
for ill activities, and the force it imparted to that very nec
essary injunction, “Do it now.”
o
The Chilean note agreeing to consider the compromise
plan for ending the Tacna-Arica dispute with Peru by ced
ing the territory in question to Bolivia, as a hopeful step
tou r ard the acceptance of its proposal. Bolivia has already
announced its willingness to accept the provinces in ques
tion. Attention now turns to the answer which Peru will
make.
o
OVER MORTGAGED INCOMES
In a copyrighted article Senator James Couzens, of
Michigan, long identified with the automobile industry,
blames a thoughtless public for the wild orgie of installment
sales, and points out the tremenduous additional costs and
danger to the buyer. He also severely criticizes the pro
moters of this plan because every $lO spent by the purchaser
on the installment basis reduces the purchasing power 10 per
cent; as a minimum. The profits of the discount companies
and all organizations expenses are maintained by the in
stallment buyer. J. H. Trigoe, executive manager of the
National Association of Credit Men, substantiates this state
ment, and asserts that over-mortgaged incomes will result in j
diminishing consumption.
THAT JAP WAR SCARE
The Japanese war scare of 1921, which the Navy De
partment refused to discuss in the Fall-Doheny trial, was
thoroughly illuminated by Mr. Doheny who was not under
official control. Official records show that at this time
the naval power of Japan w r as as 3to the United States 5,
andvit is an axiom of naval warfare that an inferior naval
powder cannot cross even a narrow' sea to attack a superior
force. It takes heaps of coal and oil to move a battleship
or transport at least 4000 miles—the distance from Yokoha-
The Delivery Departmet Gets Ambitious Again
I ..
ma to San Francisco. And, even if it were possible, would
they have been allowed to go their way unmolested by the
American navy? Since we are to take for granted that
we would not have gone undefended, that two years after
demobilization, with our war organization in a position to
resume activity in short order, with millons of men who had
borne arms ready to come to the country’s defense—are w'e
to believe that Japan, infinitely weaker and poorer than the
United States, was blind to these facts and would have at
tacked us regardless?
Mr. Doheny says naval officers were very much alarmed,
but it is the general opinion that they were disgracefully mis
informed by Japanese jingoes who used the incident to furth
er certain oil-storage plans.
The people of this country have been well fed on “bunk”
from many sources, including the “yellow peril” Communism,
Mexico, the Philippines, Central America and the World
Court. There’s so much of it that patient citizens are not
only losing interest in elections but losing faith in their
affairs. The “bunk” business has been overplayed. Abra
ham Lincoln had something to say about “fooling the people”
that should not be forgotten.
A BILLION CHRISTMAS CARDS
Somebody has estimated that sopsthmg like a billion
I greeting cards changed hands during the past two weeks.
Every kind of card went through the mail, from the simp
lest little printed affair at two or three cents to hand-painted
or individually designed cards and etchings and copies of
famous paintings, selling as high as SSO.
Once in a while someone is moved to ask what it’s all
about. Certainly it helps to make the postman’s life harder
one month every year. It is also an unpleasant but inescap
able fact that a good many recipients of these cards glance
at the names of the senders, feel pleased a moment and then
throw the cards into the nearest waste-baskt.
Hoewver, the greeting card industry has become a big
one and the popular demand for its product shows no weak
ening. If it really adds to true Christmas joy and good-will
then it is probably worth the $16,000,000 at which it is now
estimated.
BANK OFFICERS WARN
|... The habit :pf writing checks in pencil is $ very danger
j roiis officiate, and is not
j only causing the banks considerable trouble in verifying tlie
! signatures but exposes the drawee to possible forgery, as
I well as the raising of checks.
Pencil writing blurs and smears very easily, and can us
j ually be erased without detection, and inasmuch as the pract
i ice is becoming so common in this section the banks feel
! that the matter should be called to the public’s attention.
It is not uncommon for the banks to refuse payment be
cause of obscure signatures and figures written in pencil,
but even though they are taking every precaution to protect
their depositors the drawee is subjecting himself to possible
loss when he does not write checks plainly, and with pen and
ink. .
o
Winslow’s community Christmas tree was a big success
and many a little tot was made happy by a visit from Old
Santa himself. The success of the tree only goes to show
what a community can do with co-operation and a little
work. Let’s start now to make next year’s tree even a
little better. The joy that it brings to the little ones’ hearts
is enough to pay back on the investment a hundred-fold.
o
It is difficult to conceal anything. Even the telephone
girl sometimes gets your number.
o
Americanism: Taking big profits from the many in
order to become philanthropists to the few.
o
In the old days a young fellow got a thrill drinking
from his first Christmas moustache cup.
o
Ultimate proof that a man and his wife have lived to
gether may be the best grounds for divorce.
o
When Columbus reached the American shore he kissed
I the dry land. If he could only see it now!
o
England is alarmed over a series of shocking air dis
asters. They have had 91 this year. The air minister
says that 82 per cent of the crashes occurred in planes built
before 1917, but the number of accidents is smaller than
ever before.
In Italy a tax on bachelors has been declared by Premier
Mussolini, who has probably noticed too many black shirts
o
with buttons missing. Anyway, matrimonial bureaus are
flourishing.
THE WINSLOW M HI.
With Other
Editors
J
WHEN ADVERTISING (01 NTS
(Arizona Gazette)
Advertising the Pacific coast
is doing, far overshadows Ari
zona with her more desirable cli- |
mate and uncomparable scenery in
the minds of eastern people when
they are seeking a place to escape
the rigors of winter.
The railroads that reach them,
it is true, give Arizona much pub
licity in their guides. That helps,
but the average person coming west
for the first time depends mostly
upon the advertising that has at
tracted their attention or the re
ports that are given them by |
friends who have been west.
Ninety-nine and one half per;
cent of the tourists and winter |
visitors who have come west here-;
tofore have gone to the Pacific ;
coast. All they know of Arizona |
is what they have seen of our des- {
erts as they have been whirled!
through the state. That does not
give Arizona much of a reference.
Today thousands of the winter
tourists come through the west in
their cars. They pick out a des
tination point as do those who trav
el by train. The big majority of
these auto tourists pay little at
tention to the country they traver
se, if they have been sold on a
promise land before they start. |
There is only one way for Arizo-1
na to divert a large part of the ‘
westward travel. That way is to j
advertise in the travelers’ home
communities, reaching them before
they plan their destination. The |
hnly ,{\yhy. Gjat Ar izona- caji po»- }
sibiy carry or) ;t‘consistent -
vertising campaign of this kind
that will be effective, is for tin; j
state to do it as a whole. An |
advertising fund should be appro-;
priated in the coming legislature:
for the coming two years that will!
be big enough to effectively ad- j
vertise the climate, the scenery, \
the agricultural and industrial ad- j
vantage that are ours.
This advertising campaign should j
he directed by the chambers of j
commerce of the 14 counties so as ;
to insure that all sections of the j
state will receive their share of it j
and that the advertising will be
of a kind that will meet the de- j
velopments needed in each sec- |
tion.
There is only one way to secure j
the passage of such an appropria- ■
tion and that is for every county j
in the state to get their legislators !
to pledge themselves to support !
such a measure NOW. Send
them to the capitol next month
with instructions that one of the
biggest things they can do at thie
time, to add the tax rolls of the
state and the general prosperity :
is to provide for the advertising
of Arizona. The surest way tci ,
reduce the tax rate in Arizona ia
to increase the tax roll. The
surest, way to increase the tax roll j
is to colonize our lands, develop |
our resources. The fastest and
surest way to do that is through
the medium of national advertising j
campaigns.
o
BETRAYED ( ONF IDEATE
(Miami Silver Belt)
The operator of u service sta
tion at Apache Junction lost a 1
valuable pet monkey as a result
of a tourist feeding the simian
chewing gum. The owner stated
that the monkey would refuse to
eat chewing gum which it found
lying within the length of its chain j
but that when the morsel was hand- i
ed it by a man, the animal readily
accepted and swallowed the gum.
' Death followed, as the internal
1 ! digestive apparatus of monkeys
j does not: seem to be capable of
disposing of chewing gum.
Thus was the monkeys confi
: denoo betrayed by man. The ani-
I nml thought that the chewing gum
which it would ordinarily reject,
was all right for it when present
| ed at the hands of the superior
animal man.
Always man has caused the
j downfall of the lower animals by
first gaining their confidence, and
then betraying it.
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS
NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE TOR DELIN.
QPEXT TAXES
i
In The Superior Court of The State
of Arizona, in ami for the
County of Navajo
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior
U. S. Land Office at Phoenix,
Arizona, November 27, 1926.
, NOTICE is hereby given that
Rufus C. Creswell, of Winslow,
! Arizona, who, on September 7,
i 1921, made original stock raising
l homestead entry, No. 050325, for
the SE 1-4, SE 1-4 NE 1-4, Lot 1,
Section 4, Township 19 N„ Range
16 E., G. & S. R. Meridian, has
j filed notice of intention to make
| Three Year Proof, to establish
claim to the land above described,
; before L. C. Henning, Clerk of the
Superior Court, at Holbrook, Ari
zona, on the 11th day of January,
1927.
j Claimant names as witnesses:
I Norman Bennett, H. R. Pitts,
Pat Hughes, George C. Creswell,
all of Winslow, Arizona.
HENRY A. MORGAN,
Register.
First pub 12-3-26; last pub 12-31-26
IN THE SUPERIOR ("OURT OF
THE STATE OF ARIZONA, IN
AND FOR THE COUNTY
OF NAVAJO
CHESTER V. SMITH AND CORA
' IM. SMITH, husband and wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs
! Frank Hicks, deceased, Cather
ine Hicks, sometimes known as
j Catherine K. Hicks, deceased, Rev
erend Thomas M. Connolly, some
: times known as Thos. M. Connolly,
Vnna May Schaar, Anna May Scharr,
Diana Malich, Diana Malick, Anna
May Bennett, nee Schaar, E. Y. Ma
lich, R. C. Kaufman, Mary Lynn
| Kaufman, wife, John Doe, Richard
Roe and the Doe Roe Company ,a
corporation and the Unknown
Heirs of each or any of the said
Defendants,
Defendants.
ACTION BROUGHT IN THE SU
; PERIOR COURT OF THE STATE
! OF ARIZONA, IN AND FOR THE
j COUNTY OF NAVAJO, AND THE
i COMPLAINT FILED IN THE OF
i FICE OF THE CLERK OF SAID
j SUPERIOR COURT TO QUIET
! THE TITLE TO Lots 1,2, 21 and
i 22 in Block 17 of the Hicks Addi
tion to the Townsite of Winslow,
Navajo County, Arizona, as shown
by the plat thereof filed in the of
fice of County Recorder of Na
vajo Countj\ Arizona.
IN THE NAME OF THE STATE
OF ARIZONA, to,
Frank Hicks,, deceased, Cather
ine Hicks, sometimes known as
Catherine K. Hicks, deceased, Rev
erend Thomas M. Connolly, sorae
i times known as Tlios. M. Connolly,
j Anna May Schaar, Anna May
| Scharr, Diana Malich, Diana Ma
lick, Anna May Bennett, nee
Schaar, E. Y. Malich, A. C. Kauf
man, Mary Lynn Kaufman, wife
John Doe, Richard Roe and the
Doe Roe Company.,
i ahd ihe ; Heirs oflefedir or
! any of the said Defendants,
Defendants.
Greeting:
I You are hereby summoned and
required to appear in an action
! brought against you by the above
; named plaintiffs in the , Superior
| Court of the State of Arizona, in
and for the County of Navajo, and
answer the complaint therein filed
; with the Clerk of said Court at
Holbrook, Arizona, in said County,
within twenty days after the ser
-1 vice on you of this summons if
j served in this said County, or in
all other eases within thirty days
thereafter, the time above mention
! ed being exclusive of the day of
service or judgment by default will
| be taken against you.
Given under my hand and seal
of the Superior Court of the State
of Arizona, in and for the County
j of Navajo this 6th day of Decem-
New Brands Applied For December 9,1926
Location of Brand
C left hip. H left thigh.
C left hip. H left thigh.
C left ribs. H left thigh.
C-left hip. H left thigh.
C left liip. H left thigh.
C left ribs. II left thigh.
Fire brand—right jaw goats.
— .
Nannies—reverse for bucks.
C right shoulder.
\ Brand Earmark
jy-gxs>
Q^Gx3>
<£/CXd
XHICX2)
zbo

KFD:OQ
LEGAtL ADVERTISEMENTS
ber. 1926.
LLOYD C. HENNING,
Clerk.
By ROBERTA W. TANDY.
(COURT SEAL) Deputy Clerk.
Decl3-20-27Jan3
notice of sale of real
ESTATE AS PROVIDED IN PARA.
GRAPHS 4986 and 4987 CIVIL
CODE 1913 ARIZONA
In pursuance to Paragraphs
4936 and 4937 of the 1913 Civil
Code of the State of Arizona, pub
lic notice is hereby given that at
any time after the 26th day of
j November, 1926, the Board of Sup
j ervisors of the County of Navajo
j State of Arizona, will sell at pri-
I vate sale for a sum that, will be
I acceptable to them, the following
described real estate, to-wit:
Lots 18 19 Block 207 Kid.
Addition to the town of Wins,
low, Navajo County, Arizona.
The above described property,
Which formerly belonged to Jose
Morales and Damasio llallejos, was
sold at. Sheriff’s sale on the 12th
day of Sept. 1925, and was later
transfered to the State of Arizona
by Sheriff’s deed. The .total taxes,
interest, penalties and costa ag
ainst this property up to and in
cluding the year 1922 is $90.50.
Dated this 23rd day of November,
. A. D. 1926.
WALLACE ELLSWORTH
Clerk of the Board of Stipends- 1
ors Navajo County, State of Ari
, zona. Nov 26 Jan 14.’
<SA/Wve/WWS»WWWSA^|
! FOR RENT—Two room furnished
apartments, lights and water free.
Aspinwall Apartments, 209 West
Aspinwall. ts
o
Mrs. Stanley Baldwin, wife of
the British Prime Minister, con
fessed that her greatest ambition
is someday to mark all her house
hold linen with an appropriate
“B.”
New Brands Applied For November 24, 1926
HRAND KAKM VIUv LOCATION OF IHtANI> NAMK OF ACCI.U ANT POSTOFFICK
I G r^s Airs. Virgil Joy,
O s h i e f£ thigh Young, Arizona.
M NC right ribs Lewis C. White,
\y ' II right thigh Wickenhurg, Arizona.
N// C left I<ibs w. S. Cobb.
/ left thigh Mt. Trumbull, Arizona.
left hip Geo. Lee Aston,
left thigh Hereford, Arizona.
Ch> left Ui P Geo. E - Roach,
/]/ H left thigh Ft. Thomas, Arizona.
v a Y / Ny" C left ribs W. W. IVhite,
V V\ H left thigh Redington, Arizona.
i C left hip Robert L. Sabin,
Ip H left thigh Cascabel, Arizona.
I I Ewes, reverse Campbell-Frands Co.
I I XLJ'nZx’’ for aethers Flagstaff, Arizona.
C left shldr Ray K. Clffff,
—j- to hip Safford, Arizona.
New Brands Applied For December 2,1926
brand EARMARK LOCATION OF BRAND NAMK OF APPLICANT POHTOPFICK
, —■ - 1 ——■ " u '' 1 “ 1 l,r 11 mr r “
C right ribs Lewis C. White,
\y H right thigh Wickenhurg
fNPA (fYT) c left ribs ora Denton '
UnA H left thigh Roosevelt
Swnn C right thigh Scott & Walton,
to shoulder Tetnf, i
n H right thigh Scott & Walton, v
j . v to shoulder Tem^e
5K <T'y7N c ieft ribs Edd De B<)rde '
lx H left thigh Sunset
—s C right hip Dorothy E. Shahan,
Phoenix
{V| V. G right ribs/ Martin Enos
pTJ H right thigh Phoenix
TT~ _____ C left sdr to hip ” Mrs. Margaret Keahey,
QtOT Hit shr to thigh Bisbee
C left hip Juno Armenta, Trustee,
H left thigh Tombstone
“17“ Little Jim,
H left thigh ?upai
D w—s C left ribs Mrs. Tennie Mills,
Y/ ©O H left thigh Wagoner
. C right ribs Donald J. Wagoner,
NVOO H right thigh.
1 i~* Fire brand 1 nose H. &J. T. Atkin,
j~| CJKD Tar brand top sds L S^. o l^_ Gr «® k
__ Ewes —Reverse for 11. &J. T. Atkin,
Wethers Short Creek
■T“ __ Fire brand r nose Rugder Atkin
JA CIXZ) Tar brand top sdrs Short Creek
Ewes Rugder Atkin
Short Creek
Wethers Rugder Atkin
Short Creek
Name of Applicant
I '
Benino Garcia.
Jose Villa.
Edwin D. Raines.
Taylor M. Woodward.
Clarence L. Satterfield.
Mrs. J. T. Hungerford.
Medd & Schill.

Medd & Schill.
R. P. Davie.
MONDAY, DEC] :MEi.:P f:7,1926
‘Bill’ Mahoney Will
Take New Job /ith
Headquarter. Here
PRESOOTT, Dec. 25.- -W. P.
(Bill) Mahoney, will go out. Os of
fice as sheriff of "Mohave county
on January ] after holding the post
with distinction for the la«t 12
years and retiring of >is own voli
tion.
Mahoney was in Prescott re
cently and while here he announ
ced that when his term ctf office
expired he at once wouid take up
the work of Divisional Special
Agent, of the Santa Fe railroad,
with jurisdiction from Albuquer
que to Seligman, a position which
will bring him to Prescott with
frequency. His headquarters will
be in Winslow.
"My new work will have re
sponsibilities fully as important lo
the public as those of sheriff, and
I shall do all I can to ‘mek*
good”” he said. "I am glad
will be so that I still can be a cit
izen of Arizona, for 1 love my
state and hope circumstances will
permit me to continue to Jive with
in its borders. The people of the
state have been goad to mo,,.and
especially do I appreciate the gen
erous faith those in coun
ty have reposed in me.”
WOMAN LEAPS TO DEATH
' | NEW YORK, Dec.'2s (AP) ■
Withdrawing from a party of
friends with whom she had been
dining in an apartment in west
55th street, Mrs. Pauline Hargett.
28, of Steubenville, Ohio, tonight
opened a window and leaped elev
esn stories to her death. Police
found in the apartment a physi
cian’s prescription blank', on the
back ot which was written "Good
bye, Connie."
Post oiile« Address
Sells.
Tubac.
Patagonia.
Wolf Hole.
Elgin.
Winslow.
Skull Valley.
Skull Valley.
Peoria. t

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