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Phoenix tribune. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1918-193?, December 21, 1918, Image 2

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the phoenix tribune
Arizona's Greatest Weekly
Phoenix, Arizona
Published Every Saturday by the Tribune Publishing Company
Address all Communications to the
PHOENIX TRIBUNE
P. O. Box 1052, Phoenix, Arizona
Entered as Second-Class Matter June 22, 1918, at the Postoffice at Phoenix,
Arizona, under Act of March 3, 1879
Business Office: 1302 East Jefferson Street
Managing Editor A. R. Smith
Subscription Rates —In Advance
One Year , - —82.00
Six Months r. 125
Three Months - - -65
Member National Negro Press Association
Advertising Rates on Application
All Matter for Publication MUST be in our Office by Wednesday evening,
as we go to press on Thursday
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, SAT RDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1818
NEGRO PROSPERITY AND PREPARATION FOR SELF-DEFENSE
(Baltimore Daily Herald)
In every part of the country unparalleled prosperity has blessed
the Negro during the past two or three years. Especially has he
reaped a harvest of prosperity in the South during the past year
and a half.
It is earnestly and fervently hoped that while money has appar
ently come in showers upon the race that its men and women will
not be dazzled by its suddenness and swept off their feet by the
appetite for pleasure and the desire for display. Now more than
any time during its history the thoughtful, sturdy and fyrward-look
ing race men and women should get in the lead and by precept and
example teach the masses the virtue and necessity of economy and
thrift. The easy money which is falling into the lap of every worker
and into the lap of some who do not work but merely pretend, will
not continue indefinitely.
We are not alarmists and do not wish to discourage or frighten
but it is our solemn duty to warn our people that periods of great
prosperity are inevitably and invariably followed by periods of great
business depression, during which thousands of fortunes are swept
away and hundreds of thousands are reduced to want and beggary.
Our duty is therefore to seize the day which is ours and lay by
a .store for the future to provide against the day of adversity and
want.
And while the tide of prosperity is running high and money is
being spent by thousands with a lavish hand, let the thoughtful
men of the race in the lynching zones, in those communities where
at times and for some reasons, also sometime without adequate rea
son, the color of a man’s skin is the sign of hsi death warrant* take
proper measures under the law for the defense of their own lives
and that of their wives and children.
p ft .r
STOP THE ‘NEXT WAR” NOW
President Wilson has stated in France that his chief reason for
being there is to put an end to the possibility of another great war.
In that he is right, and has the support of every patriotic American.
We are not hearing just now the voices out of Germany telling
of plans for the ‘‘next war.” The ‘‘next war” is for the time being
carefully shelved in Berlin.
* What a ‘‘next war” would be, we now have a fairly clear idea.
The submarine, developed and perfected, would range and rage in
every sea. The aircraft of today is nothing in comparison with what,
aerial monsters would be in a war twenty-five years from now. The
air monster of the future would carry hundreds of tons of higher
explosives than can lie carried by the ton today. The gun that drops
shells seventy-five miles away is in its infancy, and whereas Paris
might suffer little damage from one such gun. one hundred such
guns would lay it, or any other city subjected to bombardment, in
ruins.
A more powerful gas would be present in a ‘‘next war.” The
liquid flames this time might be launched from the air, instead of
from near distance on land. The ‘‘next war” would be a terrible,
scientific massacre and devastation.
But there is only one sure way to prevent a ‘‘next war,” and
that is for the great democracies of the world—democracies in fact
as well as in form—to unite in a league against war. This would
involve limitation of armies to national police forces, with prohibi
tion of draft service by any country in time of peace.—Exchange.
' "" ' "■»"
Harpers - USED GAR Department I
I have a number of good Used Cars, including
heavy and light Touring Cars and Roadsters. Will
sacrifice for cash or make very attractive terms.
A GOOD USED CAR IS A NICE XMAS PRESENT
PHOENIX MOTOR MART
Phone 3894 235 W. Wash.
—» ' ■■■■»———■ »
When You Get Ready
to furnish that extra room, come and see us.
Trade in your old furniture as part payment on real
up-to-date new furniture.
Ford’s New Annex
144 East Adams Street
*————- -
: | SOCIETY AND LOCAL NEWS j
Mrs. Shepperson Indisposed —Mrs.
A. G. Shepperson, 547 East Jefferson
street, is slightly indisposed this week.
She is being attended by a physician
- and expects to be able to go about her
, work as usual in a few days.
Florence Visitor—Mr. Wm. Mabry
of Florence, Ariz., was a visitor in the
city a few days last week.
Mrs. Baxter to San Diego —Mrs.
Sarah Baxter, 1034 East Jefferson
street, left this week for San Diego,
Cal., to he at the bedside of her son,
Lincoln, who was hurt in an accident
there recently. Lincoln Is enlisted In
the U. S. navy and is being cared for
at the base hospital in that city. He
suffered a broken arm and a dislo
, cated shoulder in an accident which
occurred recently.
Mrs. A. R. Smith Indisposed— Mrs.
A. R. Smith, wife of the managing edi
tor of the Phoenix Tribune, has been
confined to her bed the past week
, suffering with a slight illness. She
* is being attended by Dr. W. C. Hack
ett and hope is entertained for hdr
speedy recovery.
Distinguished Visitor Here—Rev. R.
A. Jackson, D. D., a prominent Baptist
: divine, is a visitor in this city. Dr.
r Jackson is a returned missionary from
Africa, where he spent sixteen years
among the natives of that country.
‘ He established over 64 missions dur
-1 ing his stay, and baptised 500 con
, verts in the Atlantic ocean. He
speaks the African language as well
as the natives and is able to interpret
- same. Dr. Jackson has consented to
1 preach for Rev. C. A. Gilmore at the
j Second Baptist church, corner Fifth
and Jefferson streets, on Sunday
1 night, Dec. 22. He will also be in at
-1 tendance at the Sunday school and
morning services and may make a few
remarks. Sunday afternoon at 3
o’clock he will deliver a lecture on his
* travels in Europe and Africa and will
t exhibit one of the African gods which
t he carries with him. He has traveled
extensively in foreign countries and
is. credited with having crossed the
■’ Atlantic six times. Dr. Jackson is not
1 a native of Africa, for he was born in
Holly Springs, Miss., and educated in
the same state He is a man of pleas
s ing personality, interesting converse
-1 tionalist. and an intellectual giant. All
; Phoenix is invited to come to the Sec
ond Baptist church, corner Fifth
street and Jefferson, and hear this
2 wonderful missionary in his talk Sun
s day morning to the Sunday school, in
his interesting lecture at 3 o'clock
and the soul-stirririg sermon which
he will deliver Sunday night. Hear
ye him!
Prescott Folk Will Visit—Mr. and
p Mrs. J. R. Robinson, on South Seventh
avenue, will have Mr. and Mrs. J. Sud
doth of Prescott as their guests dur
. ing the holidays.
r Annual Entertainment F. and A. M.
, —Owing to the epidemic of influenza
which prevented our annual entertain
ment being given on the usual date,
. we desire to announce the new date
i for the entertainment as December
. 26, and it will be held at Patrick’s
hall on West Washington street. All
sojourning Masons are cordially in
’ vited to come and enjoy themselves
j with us. All invitations to this enter
tainment have not been delivered, but
you will receive yours in due season.
1 Maricopa Lodge No. 16, F. &A. M.
i —Adv.
New Grocery Store Opens—Marvin
Smith has opened a completely new
and thoroughly equipped grovery es
tablishment at 331 East Washington
, street, on the site where his father,
A. G. Smith, first founded the Arizona
Grocery company, a number of years
ago. The policy of this new store
* will be to sell the very best merchan
[ dise at the lowest possible price. A
complete delivery system to all parts
of the city will be maintained. Busi
ness will be on a strictly cash basis. '
Mr. Smith invites your patronage and
will treat you right.
Strong Organization Launched—A
representative body of colored citizens
met last Monday night at Dorris Hall,
35 East Washington street, and organ
ized a society or league, the object
of which is to form a more perfect
union among the colored citizens of
the state of Arizona, provide for the
common defense of said people, pro
mote the general welfare and thus se
cure the blessings of equal rights, lib
erty and justice to ourselves and our
brothers. The name tentatively
agreed upon for this organization is
“Phoenix Protective League.” It will
be state-wide in its scope, having sub
ordinate leagues In every town and
hamlet in the state where ten or more
colored citizens reside. It contem
plates the protection, advancement
and general uplift of colored citizens
■ whersoever dispersed throughout the
state of Arizona. J. A. Green, a large
property owner, an old resident of the
state, a brilliant scholar, a deep think
er, a man of unusual executive ability
—calm, impartial, diplomatic and a
real leader, was chosen permanent
chairman of the League. Mrs. Jessie
James was elected vice-president; R.
D. Simpson, secretary; Mrs. I. F. Sil
vas, treasurer. R. s. Stearns was
elected sergeant-at-arms. Peace and
harmony prevailed throughout the
meeting and enthusiasm ran high.
The organization had the most aus
THE PHOENIX TRIBUNE—ALWAYS IMPROVING
picious beginning of anything ever be
fore attempted in the history of Phoe
nix If the unshaken faith in a great
leader, openly manifested at this meet
ing, and the enthusiastic endorsement
of him and the cause he represents,
count for anything, the League will
be a wonderful success. Next meet
ing will he the first Tuesday night in
January, 1919, Dorris Hall, 35 East
Washington street.
Horn e Again Mrs. Georgia A.
Owens, 619 East Jefferson street, who
has been performing domestic service
in a country home near here, returned
this week.
Notice, Christmas Shoppers!—ln
this issue of the Tribune you will find
a complete list of mercantile estab
lishments which offer timely sugges
tions and attractive prices to the Col
ored citizens. Remember, an adver
tisemeent in the Tribune is a personal
invitation to YOU. Go where you are
invited.
Mrs. J. B. Bell Indisposed —Mrs. J.
B. Bell, 1340 East Madison street, has
been very ill the past week. Dr. Hack
ett has been attending her and she is
reported convalescent.
A. C. Council Improving—Mr. A. C.
Council, who was hurt in an accident
a few weeks ago, is steadily improv
ing. Unless complications set in, he
will be out in a few days.
Pueb|o Visitors —Mr. Henry Taylor
of Pueblo, Colo., is a recent arrival in
Phoenix. He is staying at the resi
dence of Mr. and Mrs D. W. Young,
1232 East Madison street. Mr. Taylor
Is an acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs.
Wm. Shannon, who are also from Pu
eblo and winter residents of this city.
Sergeant Post Writes— Mrs. D. W.
Young received a letter from her son,
Sergt. John Post, who is in France.
He is doing fine and likes army life.
Sergt. Post visited in this city last
year and is very well known among
Phoenix folk.
Chandler Visitors—Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Gray of Chandler were visitors
in Phoenix this week. They motored
over in their new Dodge tourning car
and incidentally purchased a few
Christmas presents.
Mrs. Alexander Visiting Here—Dur
ing the past week Mrs. O. G. Howard
had as her guest Mrs. F. H Alexander
of Chicago.
Will Leave for California —Mrs. Mat
tie Lee and Mary, will leave*
Monday for Los Angeles, Cal., to make
thbir future horn*.
Mrs. Chas. Convalescing
Friends of Mr. ipd Mrs. Chas. Fish
will be pleased to learn that Mrs. Fish,
who has been confined the past three
weeks, is well on the road to recovery.
Burgess’ at Home— Rev. and Mrs.
W. Burgess, who recently returned
from California, have again occupied
their former home at 14 North Elev
enth street.
Buys Himself a Ford—Mr. Phil
Green, one of the most popular young
men in Phoenix, has seen fit to invest
several hundred dollars in a brand
new Ford touring car.
Red Cross Workers —Mrs. Lucy Lu
cas, chairman of the committee of col
ored women workers for the -Red
Cross and Xmas Roll Call, stated that
the committee is having no difficulty
enrolling members of our race. Those
associated with Mrs. Lucas in this
noble cause are: Mesdames E. L. Clay
ton, Jessie James, George W. Cald
well, R. S. Stearns.
HOW “PIN MONEY”
FIRST GOT NAME
(Exchange)
This expression originally came
from the allowance which a husband
gave his wife to purchase pins. A
one time pins were dreadfully expen
sive, the Book of Wonders explains
so that only wealthy people could af
ford them and they were saved so
■ carefully that in those days you could
not have looked along the pavement
and found a pin which you happened
to be in need of as you can and often
do today.
By a curious law the manufactur
ers of pins were only allowed to sell
them on Jan. 1 and 2 of each year
and so when those days came around
the women whose husbands could af
ford it secured pin money from them
and went out and got their pins.
Pins were known and used as long
ago as 1347 A. D. They were intro
duced into England in 1540. In 1824
an American named Might invented
a machine for making pins which en
abled them to be manufactured
cheaply. About 1,500 tons of iron and
brass are made into pins every year
in the United States. Which reminds
us of the old, often asked but never
satisfactorily answered question:
"Where do all the pins go?”
M-P Rebuilt Tires
Made in our own shop, eost just one-half the price
of a now tire and are
GUARANTEED FOR 2,500 MILES
Guaranteed Vulcanizing and Retreading
VAN’S TIRE HOUSE
“Where Both Sides of Your Dollar Count”
31 South First Ave. Phone 4692
-
The Bargain Counter
By Bert Brafey
Bargains in dress goods and bargains
in lace,
Bargains in garments of beauty and
grace.
Here are the offerings piled in a heap,
Bargains on bargains—remarkably
cheap!
Wait, let’s see whence these bargain
goods came
Ere we plunge into the bargaining
game!
Look at that exquisite waist—it was
made
Down in the slums by a wogttan ill
paid;
Glorious plume for a wonderful hat?—
Little child hands gave the beauty to
that!
Bargains in goods? Why they’re bar
gains in pain,
Bargains in bodies and bargains in
brain; ,
Bargains in manhood and woman
hood, too,
Bargains in childhood here offered
to you;
Bargains in hate and oppression and
greed,
Bargains in hearts that must suffer
and bleed,
Bargains from sweatshops and pesti
lent holes,
Bargains in labor and bargains in
souls,
Here on the counter together they lie,
Bargain sale! Bargain sale! Come
on and buy!
o
DICTATES OF FASHION
Veils are many and varied in de
sign and manner of being worn.
Soft pompons are a novel means of
fastening a dress at the side.
Long jet fringe has a graceful ef
fect on gowns of draped net.
Long, straight tunics are worn with
rather narrow straight skirts.
Long .straight, transparent sleeves
have close sleeves inside them.
Very smart dresses for the little girl
are made of contrasting materials.
One-piece robes are made which
have a distinct effect of being wrap
ped.
Some capes are cut to drape over
one shoulder like a Roman toga.
Junior Model
Midnight blue velvet is the cover
ing of a large picturesque model hat
which will be much affected by the
young girl this winter. It rolls up
, in the back and is garnished with a
large wired bow of midnight blue
satin. The bow may also be made of
navy blue lace, well wired, of course,
which gives a more dressy finish to
the hat.
Slipper Buckles
A pair of slipper buckles for black
satin slippers are made of small, cut
steel beads, simply fastened one next
the other in an oblong shape to form
a buckle.
*s**S**l**{**s*-s**s*4* , s* + +
♦ CLASSIFIED *
* ADVERTISEMENTS *

Hair Dressing and Hair Straighterting
It’s a crime to have short stubborn
hair. The Poro System will remedy
this defect. Men as well as women
may have their hair successfully
treated by this method. We use the
Poro System exclusively and guaran
tee results. Phone 4845 for appoint
ment.
Mrs. J. A. Wimberfey
217 North Eleventh St.
MUSIC TEACHERS
Mrs. Matthew A. White, 809 So. 4th
ave., has organized a music class and
will accept students for piano lessons.
Anyone desiring the services of a com
petent musical instructor may call at
above address. Terms reasonable.
FURNISHED ROOMS T
FOR RENT —Nice room for rent; no
sick. Gentleman preferred. Apply
1421 East Van Buren St. Phone
2079. %
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
Watch Phoenix Grow
3-room house, fine shade, $1,050 —
SSO Cash, sls a month.
5-room house, close in, $1,150 —$200
Cash, S2O a month.
7-rom house near High school, $2,100
—s3oo Cash, $25 a month.
M. H. SHELTON,
215 W. Washington.
Photography
DON’T FORGET THE ADDRESS—
Electric Studio, 37 W. Adams St. Ping
Pong Photos, 3 positions, 10c*doz. Post
Cards, 3 for 25c; 60c doz.
NEED MONEY?
Loans easy to get up to $l5O on your
furniture, piano, automobile, etc. Don’t
be. without money. Just phone us for
information. The rest is easy. Strict
ly confidential.
MUTUAL LOAN CO., 1500 Grand Ave.
Office hours 8 a. m. to 5 p m.
For Kmas
At This Store You
WiU Find
A full line of the celebrated Elmer’s Chocolates of
New Orleans in 50c to $2.00 packages.
Parisian Ivory
A beautiful assortment of pieces and sets
«
. Burnt Leather Goods
in a wide variety of articles that make delightful
gifts.
Christmas Cards and Stickers.
Christmas Tree Tinsel
and tree decorations: The only place in town where
you can get tinsel.
When You Are
Shopping
Don’t fail to drop by and get a big sack of nice Crisp
Butter Kist popcorn. Pure and sanitary. Never
touched by the hands. •
Mason's
Pharmacy
E. CARTER MASON, Proprietor
Phone 768 Corn. 2nd and Washington Sts.
For Our
Christmas
Patrons
JUST RECEIVED A FRESH STOCK OF BICYCLES, TIRES AND
SUNDRIES. WE HAVE AN ASSORTMENT THAT WILL PLEASE
EVERY BOY, GIRL, MAN OR WOMAN. OUR STOCK INCLUDES—
-1
PIERCE, EMBLEM,
RELIANCE, EXCELSIOR,
aruT
HARLEY DAVIDSON
BICYCLES
%
• DIAMOND, VITAUC, UNITED STATES and
P. M. S. TOUGH TREAD TIRES
OPEN UNTIL 9 O’CLOCK EACH EVENING
Give us a trial, satisfaction guaranteed
Phoenix Cycle
Company
H. C. CRANDALL, Prop.
108 East Adams St. Phone 1717
j 25 Per Cent Off on Heatersj
ij: General New and Second Hand Store.
FURNITURE, STOVES, GRANITEWARE, HARNESS, HARDWARE, |j
| SADDLES AND FIREARMS
At Most Reasonable Prices
ARIZONA SUPPLY CO. J
339-347 E. Washington St. Telephone 1476 '
Saturday, December 21, 1918

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