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Phoenix tribune. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1918-193?, April 19, 1919, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
THE PHOENIX TRIBUNE
Arizona’s Greatest Weekly
Phoenix, Arizona
Published Every Saturday by the Tribune Publishing Company
Address all Communications to the
PHOENIX TRIBUNE
P. O. Box 1052, Phoenix, Arizona
Entered as Second-Class Matter June 22, 1918, at the Postoffice at Phoenix,
Arizona, under Act of March 3, 1879
Business Office: 1302 East Jefferson Street. Phone 1250
Managing Editor A. R. Smith
Subscription Rates—ln Advance
One Year _...52.00
Six Months I 1.25
Three Months .65
Member National Negro Press Association
Advertising Rates on Application
fill Matter for Publication MUST be in our Office by Wednesday evening,
as we go to press on Thursday
<stmgis6
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 1919
The weakest living creature, by concentrating on a single jj
| object, can accomplish something; whereas, the strongest, by 1
| dispersing his over many, may fail to accomplish anything.— €
I Marden.
mnfjf
WHAT PHOENIX NEEDS
No city in Arizona is experiencing a more rapid increase in its
Colored population than Phoenix. People from every section of the
country are flocking to Arizona and this city seems to be their main
objective. In view of this fact, the need of several Race enterprises
is apparent. What we need most is a first-class hotel for colored
people. The few rooming houses we have are crowded to capacity
and people are being turned away daily. No matter how much
money one has, it is next to impossible to secure first-class hotel
accommodations. We also need a high-class restaurant; a drug store
and soda fountain; a grocery store and meat market; a co-operative
mercantile establishment and other business enterprises.. We could
ably support an attorney; an undertaker and embalmer; another real
estate dealer and a few other .professional men. Somebody must
take the lead and others will follow. Who has initiative and back
bone enough to make a start? Come forward, please.
POLITICS MUST BE GREAT '
One of our readers remarked that the editorial column of the
Tribune was not quite up to the standard in regard to politics. He
, said that in reading the Colored newspapers from different sections
of the country, one is able to find, in the various editorials, what the
real sentiment of the Colored people was in matters pertaining to
politics. If the sole object of this reader is to find out what the Col
ored voters of Arizona are thinking about and the political direction
in which they are inclined, he will have to read some other paper
besides the Phoenix Tribune. Politics is too complicated for us and
we refuse to have anything to do with it. Our limited newspaper
experience will not permit us to dabble in politics. While we be
lieve politics is something great, we fail to see whereiu our editorial
column could be strengthened by it. We have seen a number of
Colored newspapers fade into insignificance by dabbling in polities
and we have not seen one prosper by it. The Tribune believes that
it can profit by the mistakes of other newspapers. If we are wrong,
please tell us the proper course to pursue. We are from Missouri.
WHAT IS BOLSHEVISM?
Bolshevism is disrespect for orderly government, trampling un
der brutal feet the sacredness of law. choking justice with bloody
hands and inflicting savage tyrnny upon the weak and defenseless.
|lt is strange that the people of this country are just beginning to real
ize that such a damnable virus is running through the veins of our
national life; and more strange is it that there is so little evidence
of a knowledge of how it came to be here and how it has emptied so
much of itself amongst us. Even now. there is considerable guess
ing about where to strike it. Bolshevism manifests itself in the un
just discrimination practiced in this country among'the people on
account of color or previous condition of servitude. The Jim Crow
system which is intended to humiliate a segment of this nation’s
truest and most loyal citizenship is based upon Bolshevism. It is
Bolshevism that mobs and lynches innocent citizens without judge or
jury and without a sense of the least regret.
What is a Bolshevist? In a splendi darticle by Mr. Arthur Guy
Empey in “Treat Em Rough” is found a definition that is adequate
and lull. It is this: “Any persons who spreads discontent, incites to
riot, waves the red flag, or condemns the principles of our constitu
tion, is a Bolshevist. ’ Now, if this nation is serious in its ranting
against this terrible poison, why not. take these Bolshevists to task?
Why not have the lawless element, the lynchers and murderers pay
the penalties for their bloody crimes against innocent humanity?
Ihe failure to do so is evidence that our nation is either grossly
ignorant or is a colossal hypocrite.—Exchange.
....
EASTER GREETINGS FROM
Nippon Noodle and
Chop Suey Restaurant
Short Orders American Style

i2i South Second Street Phone 4991
THE PHOENIX TRIBUNE—ALWAYS IMPROVING
MESA News and Advertising
....S. L. DANIELS, Representative
Mesa has been the scene of many
notable visitors the past week. Anton?
them were the officials of the Arizona
Baptist convention and attending del
egates to the Woman’s Home and
Foreign Missionary society. The con
vention met at the First Bapiist
church and the ladies held their ses
sion at the First Methodist church,
which was generously donated them
by the pastor, Dr. Reid, and the of
; fleers. Friday night, April 11, the
session was held at the Orpheum the
atre. A large crowd was present. An
illustrated lecture was delivered by
one of the field missionaries to the
Hopi Indians. The entire session was
well attended. Rev. J. B. Bell, field
missionary for the colored Baptists
in Arizona and New Mexico, was
among the attending missionaries at
this convention. The meeting was a
success in every way.
New arrivals in the city are Mrs.
j W. L. Ferguson and six children, Col
! orado, Texas; the children’s names
are Helen, Don, Evelyn, Vivian,
Leon Jr. and little Carl Ferguson.
The father and husband has been in
Mesa for some time and is now com
fortably settled with his family. They
reside on Morris street.
Mrs. W. J. Smith and family of
Phoenix motored to Mesa last Sunday
to meet Mrs. Smith’s mother and
other relatives. There was a happy
family reunion in Mesa last Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Lon Wilson have
moved to South Hobson street.
Mr. H. C. Scott, who has been on
the sick list, is now able to resume
his work at the H. D. Evans school
A number of important events are
scheduled for next week. Wal eh
these columns for full account of the
happenings.
Katie Genevieve Ferguson arrived in
Katie Genevive eFrguson arrived in
Mesa last week from Colorado, Texas.
THE AMERICAN NEGRO SOLDIER
The American Negro, fighting in
Europe, believed that in fighting the
Germans he was also fighting indi
rectly for his own privileges at home
in America. Although he had been
denied equality before the law and
other rights guaranteed by the Con
stitution, he, no doubt, hoped that
view of his willingness to fight tor
his country, these constitutional guar
antees might at last be awarded him.
The American Negro soldier returns,
looks for his reward and finds that:
According to the records of the Na
tional Association for the Advance
ment of Colorfed People, “In 20 months
since the United States entered into
the great war to make the World safe
for democracy, and when the Ameri
can people were dedicated to so high
a purpose, 103 Negroes had been
lynched.” And that it is on the in
crease that 24 more lynchings oc
curred in 1918 than in 1917. He fur
ther finds that: "Since President Wil
son appealed to the country against
lynching on July 26, asking the gov
ernors of the states, law officers and
men and women of every community
in the United States to keep Ameri
ca's name without stain or reproach,
and to co-operate actively and watch
ful to make an end of this disgraceful
evil, saying that lynching cannot live
THE SAFE WAY
to handle
REAL ESTATE DEALS
is through a
RESPONSIBLE TITLE COMPANY
PHOENIX TITLE & TRUST GO.
130 West Adams St.
The Story
of Arizona
—by—
WILL H. ROBINSON
An Interesting Narrative History of Our State
ILLUSTRATED—PRICE $2.-50
Should be in every library
THE BERRYHILL CO.
PUBLISHERS
For sale at all book stores
Mesa Ice Cream Parlor
No. 7 South MacDonald St.
ICE CREAM, CANDY, SOFT
DRINKS AND.QUICK LUNCH
Best Coffee in Town Come Get It
FOR BERRTS SERVICE CAR
Call Phone No. 6—Res. 22-5 R
Stand in front of Everybody’s
Drug Store
Mesa Arizona
Rooms 50c, 75c and $1
COMMERCIAL ROOMS
PHAN A TATE DEAS, Proprietress
10 Rooms 40 Cots
138 East Main Street
Mesa, Arizona |
PARLOR RESTAURANT
and Lunch Counter
Regular Meals and Short Orders
Your Patronage Solicited
130 West Main St. Phone 304
MESA, ARIZ.
I COMMENCING l
j EASTER SUNDAY j
| we will offer for a few days only a ?
j High Grade Special j
| Portrait
{at your price. Call and see our |
i samples. j
TENT STUDIO
f Next door to P. O. t
i Mesa Ariz. |
For Transfer Service
LIGHT HAULING AND MOVING
R. W. HORTON
Phone 44 M6sa, Ariz.
Buy a Gas Iron
Saves you a thousand steps.—Does
not heat the house
SAFE, ECONOMICAL, RELIABLE
Mesa Racket Store
“Always Something New”
where the community does not coun
tenance it, 19 Negroes have been
lynched in 10 states, nine of them
Southern and one a Western state.”
The Association also called the gov
ernor of Mississippi’s attention to the
fact that there were 62 lynchings since
January 1, 1918 (24 more than in 1917)
—seven of these being in Mississippi,
five of the victims were women.”
NOTE: A late telegram reminds
the governor of Louisiana’s increased
lynchings,—3 in 1916, 6 in 1917, 9 in
1918, and for the first six weeks of
1919 at rate of 25. At this dangerously
increasing pace, within 20 years the
whole population would be lynched—
each year.—Vigilante, New York.
[aster Candies
Chocolate Shop
Lortney's ,
Christopher's
Vz pound to 2 pound packages
Fresh by express weekly.
The Busy
Drug Store
C. P. DUNN, Mgr.
Motor Delivery Phone 660
I
Phone 1983 Opposite Postoffice
C. J. ARTHUR
Dealer in
CIGARS, STATIONERY
SOFT DRINKS, CONFECTIONERY
NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES '
Agency: Phoenix Steam Laundry
147 North First Avenue
Phoenix - - - Arizona
MUSICAL" /
MUSIC ///
\\Coyy
The Firm Established
That Made j n phoenix
Arizona \ M in
Musical
Heath
Studio
First Avenue and
Adams
Los Angeles Grocel’y
601 E. Washington St.
STAPLE AND FANCY GRO
CERIES AT REASONABLE
PRICES
GEO. HURST, Prop., Phone 1740
Phone 1528
JERRY DOYLE
Farm Tools
Store No. 1 Grand Avenue
Store No. 2 3d Ave. and Jefferson
Phoenix, Arizona
BEFORE YOU BUY A
BICYCLE
Let us show you the
IVER-JOHNSON
As good as the Best—Better than !
, , the Rest
KING BROTHERS
Phone 1365 110 East Adams St.
- !
Fish House
Fried Fish atall Hours |
REGULAR DINNER EVERY DAY |
Spe.cial Chicken Dinner on Sunday J
Old Fashion Home Cooking
Give Us a Trial
J. W. SNELL, Prop. 27 S. 2nd St.
—————' ;
BLANTON BARBERS' SUPPLY
We Resharpen Safety Blades, Grind
and Hone Razors
208 W. Washington, Phoenix, Ariz.
The Boston Restaurant
Serve Regular Meals and Short
Orders
Your Patronage Solicited
R. P. SHERMAN, Prop.
East Boston St.
Chandler Arizona I
Jf r im
, Hjp
to ii •(
C. W. CISNEY
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
from smallest repair Job
to
Largest Apartment, Business House, or Factory
Plant
All Kinds Mill Work
Office and Planing Mill
409 So. 3rd St. Phone 1309
I"* 1 "" 1 " 1— " ~ >
BOUGHT, SOLD and EXCHANGED
CLEANING—PRESSING—REPAIRING
Cleveland (§L Banks, Proprietors
41 South 2nd Street Phone 4155 Phoenix, Arizona
ICE CREAM SHERBETS CANDY
Special Prices for Church Socials, Picnics, Lawn Parties, etc.
j HOME OP CACTUS CANDY
t
Auto Mechanic
719 WEST WASHINGTON
General repairing and overhauling. Gasoline Engines a Specialty.
Give Vs a Trial
■■■ _ i ' i
ygSv The Bull’s Eye
Shooting Gallery
BULL’S EYE E. H. SARGENT
The Largest Shooting and Doll Baby Gallery in Arizona
THREE SHOTS OR THREE BALLS FOR FIVE CENTS
Canay, Cash and Gun Prizes Open Day and Night
Phones: Office 3089. Residence 8797
MORE AND BETTER DENTISTRY FOR LESS MONEY
36 E. Washington St., Goldberg Bldg. Phoenix, Ariozna.
A Friendly Bank —

Your success depends upon yourself, but you can make it more cer.
tain by having a banking connection that will be of real help to you
in your daily business and financial affairs. Our experience is at
your service.
Member of Federal Reserve System 17_ll *
capita* ,„d surplus Tl »e »*<«* Bank
$600,000.00 Phoenix, Arizona
The National Bank of Arizona
Established 1881
WE PAY 4% ON SAVINGS DEPOSITS
YOUR ACCOUNT SOLICITED
PHOENIX ARIZONA
Saturday, April 19, 1919

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