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Phoenix tribune. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1918-193?, March 27, 1920, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060881/1920-03-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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PAGE FOUR
EASTER SPECIALS
WHITE HOUSE MER. CO.
225 East Washington St.
Wo carry a complete line of Ladies’, Men’s and Children’s Ready-to-Wear
Furnishings. AVe can fit you from head to foot at the lowest prices in town.
Beautiful line in Silk Dresses and Meseline. Skirts and Waists at 25 per
cent discount off regular prices. Below we give a few of our —
EASTER SPECIALS
AVhite Fancy AAhaists $1.45 # AYash Skirts (dark) $1.75
AVhite Fancy AVaists $1.95 Fancy Plaids Percale $1.50
AVhite Fancy AVaists $2.25 Fancy Plaids Percale $1.75
Aliddies $1.50 White Skirts, extra fine $3.00
Middies $1.95 , AVhite and Striped Skirts—
Middies $2.50 Extra fine $5.45
In Our Shoe Department We Offer Special Discount of TEN PER CENT on AH SHOES
DON’T FORGET THE PLACE-NEXT TO THE BOSTON STORE
225 EAST WASHINGTON ST. PHOENIX, ARIZONA
f FLAGSTAFF t
(Bv Reginald Jackson)
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Davis entertained
with an anniversary party last week.
Cards and music furnished entertain-,
ment for the guests, after which a
delicious repast was served. The j
room was cleared and all began trip
ping the light fantastic until the wee j
sma’ hours. On departing all declared '
Mr. and Mrs. Davis delightful hosts.
The W. M. M. S. met last week with
Misses Carrie and Bessie Smith and
transacted such business as came be
fore the body. Dainty refreshments
were served by the hostess, after
which the meeting adjourned until
next week.
Mr. and Mrs. Judge Miller enter
tained last Tuesday evening with a
card party at their home. Many
guests were present and all had an
enjoyable time. Refreshments were
served and greatly enjoyed.
Mr. and Mrs. Garrison were hosts
to a party of friends at their home
last Sunday night. All report an en- :
joyable time.
Mrs. W. L. Horne entertained the'
11. W. C. last week. The usual l/usi- 1
ness was transacted, after which a )
delicious repast was served.
Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Garrison left
last week for Phoenix, where they
will spend several days visiting
friends.
(By Archie Lewis)
Mr. Joshua McKelvey returned to
Ray last week after spending several
months in Texas and Oklahoma visit
ing friends. He purchased the home
formerly owned by his brother, Wal
ter, and has moved into it.
Willus Wright of Superior passed
through Ray Monday en route to Hay
den to visit his mother and sister.
Mrs. C. H. Vann’s two weeks’ old
son is doing fine. He has been chris
tened Georg".
J. A. Lewis left last week for Casa
Grande on business.
W. P. Crump visited his family in
Phoenix last week. During his ab
sence Miss Elizabeth Crump conduct
ed the business and was the hous§
guest of Archie and Mrs. Lewis.
J. A. and Mrs. Lewis entertained a
few friends at dinner on Sunday even
ing, March 21, at their beautiful home
in Sunny Side. The table was deco
rated with pink and Cherokee roses
and quite a delicious dinner was
served. Covers were laid for Mr. and
Mrs. L. H. Harris, of Hercules Hill;
Miss Jerome Woodman, of Muskogee,
Okla.; Miss Elizabeth Crump, Mr.
Joshua McKelvey, Mr. and Mrs.
Archie Lewis. After dinner the after
noon was spent in conversation and
on departing the guests proclaimed
Mr. and Mrs. Harris charming hosts.
o
,>, ... ... ... ... ... ...
: winslow i
* •> •> .;. .>
(By Mrs. S. Wilhite)
The H. T. Needle and Art Club is
still progressing and much interest
is being manifested in it by the ladies
of this community. On last Thursday
the members were entertained by Mrs.
T. R. Simpson. A bouquet of roses
was presented Mrs. Wilhite, who had
been indisposed the past week.
Mr. and Mrs. McCool were dinner
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Yeager last
Sunday.
Mrs. Lyons of Gallup, N. M„ has
been in the city several days attend
ing her sister, Mrs. Wilhite.
Mr. McCool was on the sick list a
few days last week but has recovered.
o
THE WOMEN WILL VOTE
Equal suffrage is about to be real
ized. The long fight of women for the
right to vote on ail questions of gov
ernment has at last ripened into a
live reality.
Indications are already plainly ap
parent that there will follow in the
wake of the adoption of the Ninfe-
iteenth Amdndment to the national l
[ Constitution, new impositions of civic |
responsibility and radical departures |
[ from practices which have operated
to a denial oi the franchise to a con
|siderable portion of the national citi
zenry.
“Grandfather clause,” “permanent
poll,” and all of the political devices j
j used by the “white South” to mini- j
mize the voting strength of our Race I
will be cast automatically into the
of political misuse by
the unequivocal provisions of the suf
frage amendment. For not only will '
approximately three million Negro ■
women be added to the voting ele
ments of the nation, but the Negro
man will be strengthened in his posi
tion as a citizen of the national and j
state commonwealths.
But there also comes to us a grave j
realization of the increased response i
bilities that have come to us in the 1
meantime. The intelligent Negro j
women must take a more command
: ing place in the social orders of the '
j land. There can be no shirking or
pandering of the instinct for political
j gain in any direction.
o
NATIONAL" HEALTH WEEK - ”
I
I
The situation of national health
make a public question of deep con
| cern for all the elements of the peo- !
pie in our common land. Our race i
should have a sincere interest in this
matter. Lowest in the economic scale,
smallest in social significance and
weakest in physical power, it becomes
-imperative that we take advantage of
i any opportunity which will enable us
! to increase our store of general
knowledge and thereby add strength
and vision to the social efficiency of
our kind.
National Health Week will soon be
with us. Whatever of program shall i
be provided for that occasion must !
be eagerly scanned in an effort to
, provide every facility for the people j
at large to get a clear understanding
,of health as it aff.utls the enure na- :
tion.
I We are one-tenth of the nation. If
lone-tenth of 'he nation is in ignorance
of the laws that serve to maintain
health, it means Hiat the nation will
finally succumb to the ravages of pes
tilence and disease. Black or white !
has nothing to do with the matter
except where criminal intention aims
to keep any of the elements in igno
rance of the laws that provide the re
lations of improved social conditions.
This is why the more intelligent
members of the race should busy
themselves to the end that every in
dividual of the group shall be made
aware of the significance and import
ance of the coming Health Week.
Health Is our biggest asset. Without
it, we ilTust fade from the face of the
earth. With health we can survive
to take a worthy place among the
strong peoples of the earth. Remem
ber Health Week and Keep It Holy.
AN ADMIRABLE PROGRAM
(By Associated Negro Press)
Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 24.—-The
News of this city calls attention to
the recently organized Negro Board
of Arbitration in an editorial which
says in part: “All thoughtful, patri
atic, kindly white people will be
pleased at one of the undertakings in
augurated to lessen the tendency to
friction between the two races.” • The
editorial calls the organization of the
j board “an admirable program of pur
pose,” and says further, “the mass of
white people, too, will be pleased to
see that Negroes of character and
true spirit are willing to step forward
and to help in such a progressive,
constructive step."
. 0
MUSICIAN MAGAZINE
MEETING WITH SUCCESS
(By Associated Negro Press.)
New York, N. Y., March 24.—The
J Master Musician Magazine, being
. j owned and published by a Colored
. | firm known as The American Music
company of Philadelphia, Pa., is win
l ning great success in New York City,
where the circulation has soared far
• beyond the greatest expectation. It
> is the only periodical of its type qn
- the market. *
THE PHOENIX TRIBUNE—ALWAYS IMPROVING '
NOTED TENOR RECEIVES
ROUNDS OF APPLAUSE
(By Associated Negro Press)
New York, N. Y„ March 24. —Roland
Hayes, the noted tenor, scored an un
qualified triumph at his recital on the
night of the 11th of March. A large
and appreciative audience greeted and
applauded the singer. He sang selec
tions of African melodies as well as
groups of modern songs. Mr. Hayes
will leave shortly for Africa, where
he will study Negro music and its
origin. His trip will include recitals
in London and Paris.
o—
SOCIETY PROTECTS ANIMALS
(By Associated Negro Press)
Norfolk, Va., Mar. 24.—At the Book
er T. Washington high school a meet
ing of coloied school teachers and
others for the purpose of forming i I
permanent organization of the auxil- I
iary to the Norfolk Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was |
held on the night of March 10th. W.
T. Cloud gave a lecture on anti-cruel-1
ty work, illustrated with stereopticon
views, showing the need of more per
sons becoming interested in the care
and protection of dumb animals. This
lecture was free and business firms
employing colored drivers were asked
to let them off from work so that they
would have time to attend the meet- !
ing.
o
■ ei e "I
RHODE ISLAND WOMEN
TAKE PART IN POLITICS
(By Associated Negro Press.)
Providence, R. 1., March 24.—Mrs.
Lucinda R. Scott, one of the most
widely known Colored women in this
city, has been named president of the
Colored women's republican organi
zation with Mrs. L. Singleton as vice
president, Mrs. S. R. Suttles as secre
tary, Mrs. M. A. Handy, as assistant
secretary, Mrs. E. Armstrong, as
chaplain, and Mrs. Ida Tutt as one
of the directors.
o
QUALIFIED
She (romantically)—The man I
; marry must be willing to go through
fire for me.
He—Then I’m the man. The boss
has fired me for telephoning you so
often.
o
SENSE AND SOUND
How oft you find the boisterous hoys
Into oblivion sinking!
The brass band makes the biggest
noise,
But doesn't do the thinking.
o
SUFFICIENT REASON
Mrs. Scalds —And just think of what
a loving couple they were when they
got married. I wonder what caused
them to quarrel so.
Mrs. Gossiphe—l found out today.
She plays a better game of golf than
he does.
o
HIS CHANCE FOR A DIG
“John,” asked his wife, who was
writing to one of her married friends,
“which is proper to say, ‘I differ from
you’ or ‘I differ with you?'”
“Tell her you differ from her. She
lets her husband have a part of his
salary to buy cigars and such things.”
o
PERSONAL PETS
“Every man is entitled to his opin
ion.”
“Yes,” replied Senator Sorghum;
“the same as a man is entitled to a
composite breed of dog. It may be
nothing to be proud of, but it’s his if
he wants to hold on to it.”
o
GAY YOUNG AMERICA
“I don’t care for the young man.
■Suppose you are making a mistake in
marrying him?”
“Well, if I am, you’ll supply me with
a divorce fund, won’t you, dear old
popsy?”
CITY OF PURPLE DREAMS
JSM— r CHAPTER 111. v
» . »-
The first person besides the news
paper men to visit Fitfhugh was Es
ther Strom. He shook hands with her
through the iron grating of his cell.
“Welcome!” he cried gayly. “But
how’d you know?”
“I came ns soon as I saw this,” she 1
replied, taking a newspaper from un- i
der her cloak and holding it between j
the bars to him. His eye caught a 1
front-page headline:
“MADMAN RUNS AMUCK!”
Turning the page he found a group :
of snapshots of himself in diverse at
titudes.
"Here’s progressive journalism 1” he
laughed, slapping the paper with the
back of his hand. “These things were
taken less than two hours ago. Not
bad work, either,” He regarded them'
critically. He gloried In the uotoriety. !
She pressed closer to the bars, nud
there was a -troubled expression on j
her face. “We must get you out of
this some way; and you mustn’t treat j
It so much ns a joke, for it’s not. I’ve :
a friend who’s a lawyer. I’ll send him
to you. I’ll manage to pay him some- 1
how, some time.”
“But why?” he asked.* “Why bother j
about me at all? I’m nothing to you.” j
“I’ll send him right away,” she
promised. “Goodby.” She pressed his
hand and was gone.
Barely an hour after Esther’s de
parture the guard let Into the cell a
rotund, sleek-looking man who Intro
duced himself by printed card as
“Roger Merton, attorney and coun
selor-at-law, Ashland block, Chicago,
hours nine to five.” He sat down be
side his client on the foul bunk, and
behind his plump hand gave a genteel
little cough.
“My boy,” he said, “you have only
one defense. It’s insanity—don’t get
excited 1”
Fitzhugh laughed. “Do I look ex- i
cited?” he asked easily, and added,
“or insane?” ♦
“You’re not Insane. Nobody said
you were. But for a while you've got
to act Insane. It's your only hope,
“You’ve Got to Act Insane."
and I’m pretty sure you’re equal tc
the acting. If you plead crazy—and
act and talk and look crazy (It’ll be
easy for you)—it’s more than likely
you'll get off lightly. It’s your only
chance.' Absolutely the only one. I’m
not saying it’s a fat one or a soft one.
I only say It’s your only one. Good
day 1”
• ••••••
The case occupied little time. The
prisoner was adjudged insane and
committed to the Dunning insane asy
lum until declared cured. Two stal
wart officers, neither of whom was as
muscular as he, escorted him to the
street.
• ••••••
Upon Fitzhugh's arrival at Dun
’ nlng he was taken to the superintend
ent’s office, and there, questioned
about his family, gave the same ficti
tious replies that had satisfied the po
lice. Next he was examined by a
physician. It was the second time he
had enacted the part of a lunatic, and
his personation must have been done
I with some success, for Ids “disease”
! was diagnosed, and he was classified
and assigned to a ward. Afteg the
customary routine of hnthing and
donning the regulation garb he had
leisure to sit down and plan his
escape. This seemed so ridiculously
simple that he almost regretted there
need be nothing spedtnculnr about It,
that there was no necessity for over
powering a guard or breaking bars, or
for any other kind of heroics.
While entering the grounds he htd
kept his eyes open, with the result
that he had a rough mental picture of
Dunning’s topography, and after the
first night he was positive he would
be free before the dawn of another
day.
He lay awake until broad daylight,
hoping the next night would be a
cloudy one, listening to the unearthly
sounds that came at intervals from
the violent wards—and thinking, think
ing. He thought mostly of the future,
and the more he thought of it the
more wide awake he became. Sleep
was out of the question.
Before noon that day came Esther.
She had brought him a basket of ed
ibles, and as she placed it on a table
beside him he detected in her manner
a disquieting suggestion of constraint
But her first words were commonplace
enough.
“How are you?” sb^asked.
“Oh, about as well as 1 look, I sap*
pose.”
“I never saw yon looking better,"
she admiringly observed, ,
J'Xflfl tana* remember yoa^haSila’l
MEN’S
110 M THREE PIECE SUITS
TAILORED - TO - MEASURE
NO LESS THAN NO MORE THAN
$32.50 $42.50
FIT AND WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
“Give Your Pocketbook' a Chance” and Investigate These Clothes
PALACE TAILORING CO.
419 East Washington St. * OPEN EVENINGS
CONTRARY ACT
“I am not surprised to hear she is
an advanced spiritualist. She Is a
woman who always goes to an ex
treme.”
“Is she? I thought she went to a
medium.”
o
TRUE TO LIFE
Photographer—Try to look pleas
ant, please.
Wife of Victim —Don't ask him to
do that. This picture is for my moth
er, and Jdie wouldn’t recognize it.
NO MORE BLUE MONDAYS
Monday will be the happiest day of the week instead of the
dreariest if you send your clothes to the UTILITY LAUNDRY
We Specialize in
ROUGH DRY AND WEI WASH
Work Taken in Late as Friday Noon Can Be Delivered Back Saturday
UTILITY WET WASH LAUNDRY
715 Grand Ave. (FIVE POINTS) Phone 4245

rbbbbhhhhb
THE MATERIAL FOR THIS' CLIMATE IS THE
Hollow Building
Tile
Better than common brick as it has a “dead air space”
making it cooler in Summer and warmer in Winter.
- SEE ME ABOUT IT
Vernon L. Clark
%
145 W. MONROE PHOENIX, ARIZONA PHONE 646
MANY BLUSHES
■■ ■■ 0
“I enjoy these old-fashioned husking
bees."
“Red ears mean kisses, eh?”
“Yes, and kisses mean red ears.”
o
BACK AND FORTH
“How could you have walked so
many miles when you’ve been in alt
day.”
“What with the children playing in
the back yard anjl a family, moving in
across the street, I haven’t ha da min
ute’s rest.”
SATURDAY, MARCH 27, 1920.
IN OUR OWN HANDS
'Neath heavy costs why fret and
whine?
The common sense advice is:
To bring about a price decline
Decline to pay the prices.
o
NOTHING IN COMMON
“Mrs. Noekum and I passed a per
fectly stupid afternoon; no commun
ity of interest, and our conversation
fell flat.”
“I see; of course! You don’t know
her neighbors and she never heard of
yours.”—Judge.

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