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The Daily Astorian. [volume] (Astoria, Or.) 1876-1883, February 27, 1879, Image 2

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ASTOKIA. OREGON:
O. C. IREL.AXI Ertitor.
THURSDAY Fkukuary 27. 1879
Coming EtchIs Casting Shadows
Before.
The arrival at Astoria of the
steamships Oregon, and Great
Republic from San Francisco, on
the same day, each laden with
merchandise and long list of pass
engers, suggests that cheap fares,
and frequent failures of crops in
California, induces the farmer there
to seek a new and cheap home in
eastern Oregon and "Washington
territory. At the least there ap
pears to be no prospect of any
dimunition in the tide of emigra
tion, of the past two years. Their
influence is already sensibly felt,
and it will be largely augumented
the ceming season.
The character of a large class of
these immigrants, and the pur
poses for which they come
can be arrived at, by examining
the business transacted in the
United States land office, in the
country east of the mountains.
We find that the number of appli
cants in that country, for premp
tion, homestead and timber culture
enterics were double in 1877 over
any preceding year. The increase
in 1878 was considerable those
two years stand as follews: In
187? number of applicants 2,438.
In 1878, 4370. The total number in
eastern Washington territory were
-5396 applicants, claims 754,960
acres, in 1877 and 1878, 4,026 ap
plicants, claims 566,S80 acres, be
ing within 1371 applicants over
all previous years. The total in
eastern Washington territory, Ore
gon and Lewiston United States
land district were 10569 applicants
claiming 1,446,720 acres.
Many of these immigrants
having exhausted their rights
to the Public lands have ap
plied to the Northern Pa
cific railroad company, and have
settled on and are improving, the
lands on the odd numbered sec
tions, expecting to purchase the
.same, when that company earn the
lands. We are informed that the
applicants for these lands, number
not less than 3,080, embracing
almost 500.000 acres. These ap
plicants are agriculturists, for
we understand the railroad com
pany refuse to accept any filing
for lands, unless accompanied by
evidences -of occupation, or im
provement. Parties engaged in
extensive sheep and cattle busi
ness, are generally nomadic in
their habits and are not content
with small tracts of land, but go
beyond the United States survey
ors operating.
From this data one can form
some idea, of the future import
ance of that country, especially
when we add the conceded fact
that, should this tide of immi
.gration continue to flow into that
country for the next twenty years,
the supply of cheap homes that
can be furnished them by Uncle
Sam and the Northern Pacific
company, will not be exhausted.
The grand old Columbia river is
the natural channel, from its source,
so far as steamboats can swim, to
its mouth, to convey the products
of that immense wheat field, ex
tending on each side of that river,
:so far as narrow guage railways
;with down grades, qan penetrate.
$31 schemes to divert the wheat
from following this natural chan
nel, to the proper shipping point,
will ultimately be a failure as
rwill be fully demonstrated within
a very few years. The Northern
Pacific railroad company know
(ifchig, rand they do not propose to be
dragged into any schemes to com
bat the natural and inevitable laws
of trade. They have an independ
ent field to develop, equal if not
superior in extent and product
iveness, and the same arbitrary
laws that drives the wheat of the
Columbia river basin down this
noble river to Astoria, will force
the wheat of the country lying
north; over the Cascade Moun
tains for shipment via the waters
of Puget sound. TheNorthen Pa
cific railroad company must open
an outlet to that country, or those
rich and extensive plains must re
main untilled, and be but sparsely
populated. Taking a broad and
comprehensive view of this great
question, it seems to us that the
relations which that company
bear toward this north-west,
instead of beinu antagonistic to
any interest on the Columbia
river, is really a co-worker
in this grand purpose that
we have all had in view from the
bemnninir to share in the trade
between Asia, and the cities of the
eastern part of our own continent.
If the Northern Pacific railroad
company will give us a through
line bv rail to the Great lakes and
connection to eastern roads, God
speed her, and the Oregon people
will always be on hand to utilize
this advantage. We have every
thing to gain by it, and nothing to
lose. The railroad company can no
more turn the natural trade
from Astoria, than they can turn
the waters of the Columbia river
intoPuiret-sound. Passengers and
exchange commodities may be
sent to, and brought from the east,
with cheapness and dispatch, all
of our surplus cereals, as well as
those of our neighbor, will find a
readier market this way. But the
Chinook salmon from the Columbia
river, and the halibut from Puget
sound, will ride in the same train,
in peace together with the fine
flavored fruits, of the Walla Walla
and the Wallamet valleys, into
eastern markets.
Trade With China.
The true inwardness of the re
cent action of the Connecticut
house of representatives, in de
nouncing the Chinese bill, is re
vealed by the New York Sun.
Connecticisjt's trade in clocks is
imperilled. Quite a number of
boxes of clocks were shipped to
China during the last year, and the
manufacturers have doubtless
looked upon the four hundred
millions of Chinese -as good for
one clock each. Colonel Sellers
made one similar calculation in
regard to selling his eye-water in
India, but they were never real
ized. The sanguine Colonel
thought that the more eye-water
the natives had, the more they
would want. This certainly would
not hold good with the Connecticut
clocks.
There is a good deal of -rose-tinted
speculation in regard to the
Chinese trade. American exports
to that country are between $3,
000,060 and $4,000,000 a year.
They sell us goods to the amount
of about 12,000,OOQ, and take the
balance in coin. This is what trade
with China amounts to at present.
Precisely how much of this three
af four millions of exports is Con
necticut clocks we have no means
of knowing. If the eastern pa
pers were authority, one would
suppose that us "Pacific slopers"
live by selling wheat to China. In
point of fact, China sends us five
dollars of products for one dollar's
worth it bu3Ts of us, and balances
are settled in coin.
But were the trade with China
ten times as large as it is, and a
hundred times more profitable, it
. would be no compensation far the
loss of the Pacific slope to the
American Union. We regard the
continued influx of these people as
a "menace to the perpetuity of the
republic, so lar, at least, as this
coast is concerned. We have seen
that white labor shrinks from con
tact with Chinese labor, precisely
as white labor shrank from slave
labor in the slave-holding states.
The condition of the laborer de
termines in a great measure the
respectability of labor. The curse
of the old slave states was, that
white men would not hold the
kinds of labor respectable which
slaves performed. For similar rea
sons, white men everywhere will
shrink from contract with a class
of laborers whose conditions in life
lower the character of their occu-
pation.
The laborer is resr)ected in
America because his compensation
enables him to live decently, to
rear and educate a family, and to
accumulate property. If we in
troduce a class of laborers who do
not preserve these conditions, labor
will be departed in proportion as
the laborer departs from them.
This is one reason why the Asiatic
and Caucasian cannot dwell to
gether. The laboring classes of
the latter have established condi
tions which the former does not
strive to maintain. If the Asiatic
cannot be kept away, the Caucasian
will keep himself away.
The strip of territory lying west
of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade
ranges is practically nearer to China
than New England. An ocean
which affords the cheapest known
mode of transit lies between the
Pacific coast and China. There is
no land travel. Chinamen come
from Hongkong for about the
same money the American citizen
pays to go to Walla Waila. A
rich and intelligently directed
company is engaged in the busi
ness of transporting Chinese labor
ers to this coast and farming them
out untiL their passage money is
repaid. There is no other limit to
the number of Chinese who mny
come, than the demand for their
labor. As they crowd in, the
whites will retire. The result
would be a Chinese colony on the
Pacific eoast of America. We
hope the president will sign the
bill.
Compliment to the Oregonian.
Falling: into line with the bah
ance of the press of this state, the
Harrisburg Nucleus speaks in
complimentary terms of the phat
boys bier sheet, thus:
The Standard to-da., in its local
department and commercial mar
ket reports, is a better paper than
the Oregonian. There is no doubt
about this fact. The Standard
gives no doctored market reports.
Noltner is entitled to the patronage
of the people and is winning popu
larity through the whole state.
He is winning this popularity by
giving the people a good paper
and treating the "interior press"
with courtesy and respect. This
course will win. But a man like
Scott, possessed of just crack-brained
imbecility enough to snub and
try to put down the "interior press,"
because it won't -fall down and
worship him, has waked alion, whose
savage growl will penetrate
every crany and nook of this broad
state, and from its lairy ambush
pounce down upon him and rend
him limb from limb. This monop
oly organ musto. It has dug its
own grave, wove its own shroud,
fashioned its own coffin; the best
and most consistent course for
Scott to take now is to go as a
missionary to China and take his
organ with him, and establish a
little Oligarchy of his own, where
the intelligence of the people is at
so low an ebb that they fawn and
lick the hand that rules them with
with a rod of iron.
The Burlingame treaty appears in
the laws of congress of 1859-CO. It
I was adojpted June 18, 185S.
-But two locks of George
"Washington's
hair are known to
be in existence. One is owned
and kept in a golden urn by the
Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, and
the other has just been presented
to Lodge No. 4, A. F. and A. M.,
of Richmond, which is the lodge in
which Washington was initiated.
The Chronicle recounting the
losses by the late ferry boat disas
ter, at San Francisco, says:
The only person among the res
cued passengers landed who was
not apparently unqualifiedly grate
ful for the deliverance, was
a middle-aged gentleman who
had lost a portmanteau, which he
left lying in the saloon while he
went in search of a life-preserver.
When interrogated as to the nature
of the contents, he stated that they
comprised 600 manuscript pages,
embodying an exhaustive exposi
tion of the Chinese situation,
which he had been six months col
lecting. This was indeed a calam
itv to the loser.
ILEI.
At Westport, February 12th, Emma
Martina, youngest child of Levi B. and
Margaret A. Gosa, aged 1 year and 3
days.
NETv ADVERTISEMENTS.
Special Auction Sale
OX
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27th,
I am instructed to sell at the residence of the
late George Duncan, Esq.. near the
O. S. N, Co.'s Dock,
One Handsome Parlor Set;
Black Walnut French Inlaid Mar
ble Top Bed-room Sets;
Dinins-room Furniture:
One China Bessert Service. Eigh
teen Pieces:
One Black Walnut, French Inlaid,
JIat-rnck. with Mirror, and Mar
ble Top Base. Very Handsome ;
Brussels and Tapestry Carpets. Stair Carpets.
Hall Oil CloMi, Chairs, liockers. What-nots.
Lounges, Mirrors. White Blankets and
Bed-spreads, Spring Mattrasses, Engrav
ings, Paintings, etc., etc.
ALSO :
One First-Class Hnllett & Dsnxs
BOSTON.
SQUARE GRAND PIANO,
COST $000 OO.
Will be sold, without reserve, to the highest
bidder. Side to commence at half past 10
A. m. E. C. HOLDEN.
Terms, Cash. Auctioneer?
MRS. J. KELLY,
Lately of Portland, has set up'a
Millinery and Fancy Goods
STORE IN ASTORIA.
All kinds of
Itace, Fringe, Velvets, and Dress
Trimmings.
All kinds of
EMBROIDERY TUCKINGS.
A nice assortment of
Woolen and Cotton Canvases and
Zephyrs, Silks, Ruchings,
and Corsets.
A large variety of
DKESS BUTTONS,
Of the latest style.
Also of
NECKTIES AND BOWS.
Come one and all, and examine mystock of
goods. Next door to the Astoriax Oflico.
S NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. TIIAT
Wols, Fargo & Co.'s Express
for San Francisco
Will hcareafter
Close Every Saturday Evening,
AT 7 O'CLOCK.
d"tf A. VAN DUSEN. Acent.
QHAS. A. MAY,
DEALER IX"
Foreign and Domestic Fruits,
Nuts, Candies, Yankee Notions, Toys.
Finest brands of
CIGARS AN TOBACCO.
Chenamus street, - Astoria.
JUST DECEIVED BY
AT THE
L. STORE!
I.
X.
Cmier Main and Concomlv streets.
GKUCfiRIES. FLOUR. FEED. WOODEN
. ware, Coal Oils. Tobaccos, and Gents Fur
nishing Goods, which will be sold at lowest
rates.
Charles Heilbokn,
MANUFACTURER OF
ss na Dgjtfwjjj
FURNITUREand BEDDING-
ALSO IMPORTER OK
CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, WALL
PAPER, SHADES, etc.
r,5AJ1 kinds of repairing promptly at
tended to and .furniture made to order.
--2 A 111! Itlin rt ninn.i .t.il.i;..ro nml
I imi.i,T1I;lH,:c' window cornices, etc.
1 f1,ul,.stock and lowest prices, comer of
J btfuemoeuiu and Slain sttcct. Astoria.
AUCTION SALES.
C. HOLDEN,
Notary Public for the State of Oregon.
Kcal Estate Ascnt and Conveyancer.
Agent for the FOREMEN'S FUND INSUR
ANCE COMPANY of San Francisco.
COMMISSION AGENT and AUCTIONEER.
Kcnts anil Actronnt Collected, ana re
turns promptly made.
Regular sales day.
SATURDAYS at I'. M.
t' 1artii,es having real estate, ltinn
!;Vr0rny other txoods to dfcposo of either
at auction or private sale should notify mr
vAlfas conV'nient betbr the day of sale.
tin orase chaiBed on Roods sou' at Auc-lM-
E. C. HOLb JN.
Alt. f lAltAAf
ECU
MISCELLANEOUS.
J. H. D. GRAY,
Wholesale and retail dealer in.
OTSTERS, hy the SACK.
Hay, Oats, Straw, Wood, Etc.
General storage and Wharfage on reason
able terms.
ASTORIA GANOY FACTORY
VXD
OYSTER SAtOO?.
HAVING EX LA K(S ED MY STOKE
nave now on hand tho largest and he-t
Srtn,icnt , ,U,!l"fc im French eandies in
town, also, all kinds of
CAKES, CKACKEKS ANT) BISCUITS,
All of which T offer for sale at the lowest
cash price, wholesale and retail at
SCHMEER'S CONFECTIONERY.
Opposite the bell tower.
Retail candy from 25 to 73 cents per pound.
.., - . . .. 0
hay oysters served in every style- g)
rresn Kasrprn ;imi 5 mniu-oto,cL vj
TfTILLlAlf Tl'nv
W
BOOT BLACX,
OCCIDENT SHAVING SALOON.
Astoria. Orkgo
Q2I1TJI MAYXES,
CRYSTAL SALOON,
On the Roadway, - - Astoria, Oregon.
S5?"-The very best quality of wines, iquors
and cigars at wholesale or retal.
Q T. JKEII,
CALEDONIA SALOON,
Corner of Front and A streets.
PORTLAND ... - OHECO-X
ffSLate butcher in the Central Market.
Astoria Liquor Store,
AUG. DANIELSON, Proprietor.
Water st. Roadway, - Astoria, Oregon.
Importer and dealer in
WINES, LIQUORS
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CIGARS.
Sole agent for the celebrated
STONEWALL WHISKEY.
Branch of MARX & JORGENSEN, Portland,
GERMANIA BEER HALL
A2CD
BOTTLE BEER DEPOT.
Chkxajius Street. Astoxt
The public are invited to cull and leave
their orders. Splendid Lnger 5 cents a glaaa.
Free- Lunch every night.
WM. BOCK & Co.. Proprietors.
GEORGE ROSS'
i Billiard Room.
The only Rilliard Room in the city wheie
no liquors are sold.
NEW TABLE JUST PUT UP. GEORliiS
has a cosv place and keeps on hand ttio
Lest brand o"f Cigars. Also, soda, eanujr.
nuts. etc. Opposite AUona Chop House.
95-tf GEO. ROSS. Propnetv-r.
THE ASTORIA BREWERY
DEPOT,
RUDOLPH BARTH & MICHAEL MEYER,
PROPRIETORS.
Corner of Ohiey and "Water street,
ASTORIA, OKEGON.
Best quality of LAGEIl BEER 5 cts. per glass
Choice Wines, Liquors, and Cigars always
on hand. .
B"Tiie patronage of the public is respect
fully solicited. Orders for Lnger or Bottled
Beer in any quantity promptly filled.
juj'-The nest lunch the season will afford
furnished day and nicht FREE.
Fishermen's Heeling.
PURSUANT TO A RESOLUTION passed
at a meeting of Columbia river fisher
men, held in this city on Monday evening
last, a meeting will be held in Astoria on
TUESDAY, MARCH 4th,
AT LIBERTY HALL,
To make arrangements to oppose the license
law pjussed at the last legislature, and all
fishermen on the river are cordially invited
to be present. By order of the meeting.
F J. G. ROliESON,
B. A. SEABORG.
Committee
Astoria, Oregon, Feb. 12, 1879. d&wtd
A RARE GHAiGL
I
WILL SELL ANY OR ALL OF THE
following uV.scnueil property, xa. :
IGO Acres, Ser. 2',', T. 8, X, orK. 9 YieiV.
.southeast quarter.
Also, in Olncys Astoria
lots J, 2, 3, anil 4, ill It Jock 19;
Lots :, 4, 5, and G, in ISIock IGO;
Lots 2 and 3, in Clnck 120; nnd Lot 8,
in ISIock IS2;
North hair or Klock 8,-2 1-2 acre.
D JIVTD TNGALLS.
Astoria, Oregon, Dec 1SJ8. 8o-Gm

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