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The daily morning Astorian. [volume] (Astoria, Oregon) 1883-1899, March 08, 1889, Image 2

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ASTOKIA. OREGON:
FRIDAY-
.MARCH S. 1SSJ.
THE AMERICAN AUTOCRAT.
The liouso of representatives of the
Fifty-first congress has lGi Repub
lican members, and 1G1 Democratic
members, a Republican majority of
three. Upon organization it will
elect a Republican speaker.
The speaker is a good deal more
than the presiding officer of the house
of representatives. The constitution
did not specify that he should be in
vested with any more power than he
would possess as the presiding officer
of that body. Neitherdid that instru
ment, framed by the fathers, limit the
prerogatives of the speaker. It sim
ply said that the house of representa
tives should choose its speaker and left
his power to be defined by the repre
sentatives themselves. The constitu
tion is quite as indefinite as to the
power of the vice president, who is
the presiding officer of the senate. It
simply states that he shall be presi
dent of the senate, but shall "have no
vote unless they be equally divided."
It does not confine his prerogatives to
this simple duty, neither doe3 it say
that he shall possess more. In case
of both the speaker and president of
the senate the constitution i3 brief
and indefinite and seems to leave both
officers to time and fate.
There is a striking difference be
tween the prerogatives which both
these officers possess now. The
speaker has grown in power steadily
since the first oongress met until to
day he seems to bo second in author
ity to the president himself. The
president of the senate, on the other
hand, has not added anything to the
authority with which he was meagerly
invested by the constitution at the
beginning. He has not, it is true,
lost any power, because ho could
hardly do that and be of any conse
quence at alL The radical difference
in the way in which the two officers
are elected is a sufficient explanation
of the expanding and increasing pow
er of the one and the undeveloped
prerogative of the other. The speak
er is chosen by the members in the
majority in the house. He is a favor
ite of tho party in power in that body.
Ho is to an extent their idoL He is
in sympathy with the policy of the
majority there, and it is natural that
his admiring followers should seek
always to invest him with as much
power as possible to carry out their
party policy. The more power he
possesses tho simpler it is for tho
party to express its purposo in legis
lation. Tho president of the senate,
however, is not chosen by tho mem
bers of that body. He is placed there
by another power entirely. He may
not be of the party in tho majority in
the senate. lie may desire to antag
onize what the ruling party there
seeks to accomplish. Ho may bo op
posed to everything that is favored by
the controlling party there. It will
thus be seen that tho speaker is al
ways the friend and champion of tho
majority and is always chosen by tho
ruling party in the house because of
his ability and popularity; while tho
presiding officer of the senate is thrust
into a body which may be opposed to
him politically and unfriendly to him
personally.
Tho constitution set these two offi
cers sido by side in power and influ
ence at the beginning. The speaker,
however, immediately forged ahead.
Tho house passed a rule that the
speaker should appoint the coaiinit-
tees of that body. Tho senators con
ceded no such authority to the presid
ing officer, but retained to themselves
the appointment of their committees.
This made tho position of theso two
officers very different. Tho speaker
at once became the molder and fash
ioner of legislation. The president df
the senate remained simply a presid
ing officer, with no participation in
shaping tho form of measures except
when the senators were equally di
vided. This difference is well illus
trated in tho extraordinary power
which Carlisle wielded at the last
congress. Ha wa3 elected for his
third term; a presidential election was
approaching; tho south had climbed
into the saddle for tho first time since
the war and had the reins of govern
ment in its hands. Carlisle desired
certain measures vigorously pressed,
and other measures effectually sup
pressed. It was a singular fact that
the measure which ho desired most to
urge was one. to which really a ma
jority of the houso was opposed, while
the measure which ho desired to de
feat was one which a large majority
favored. Carlisle wanted to stifle the
Blair educational bill, and he desired
to promote a free trade measure. At
the time of his election, there was a
large majority in the house in favor of
tho Blair bill, while at the time of his
election there was a majority in the
house against a free trade bilL This
state of facts would have been devel
ODedhadthe two mpncmrixi Iiu ..(
- - .Vw VWVUfJUtll
upon their passage without 'interfer
ence by the president of the United
States. But Mr. Carlisle by the use
of tho power which tho speaker has
gradually acquired, composed the
committee on ways and means of such
members as would bring in as soon as
possible a bill which went as far in
the direction of free trade as the rev
enues of tho country would allow and
he constituted the committee on edu
cation and labor in such a way that tho
Blair educational bill, which appro
priates 876,000,000 for tho advancing
of common school learning in the
country, when it came from the senate
wasjiever heard of again.
What a striking contrast to this ex
traordinary power wa3 the meager in
fluence which vice president Hen
dricks exerted when he became the
presiding officer of the senate. He
did not name a single member of any
committee in the senate. He could
not render tho least aid to any meas
ure before tho senate. He was con
fronted with a hostile majority. Tho
committees to which were referred the
bills which were introduced in the
senate over which he presided were
unfriendly to every policy which he
favored. Ho could neither help free
trade nor repress education. His en
tiro official duty consisted in main
taining order and dispatching busi
ness according to ihe rules adopted
by the senators. He was impotent to
express hi3 opinions or thoso of his
party upon any measure which came
before the senate.
The speaker of tho house has as
sumed another power which gives him
influence among the members, and
adds much dignity to the office. He
has betaken to himself the right to
recognize one member rather than an-
other as he chooses, without regard to
the time when they address him. It
is a common rulo of parliamentary
practice that "the person whom tho
chairman first hears addressing him
shall be recognized. This simple and
just law does not obtain in the house
of representatives. One member may
rise in his place and clamor vigor
ously for recognition, and may be ut
terly ignored, while another who has
addressed the speaker after the first,
may bo recognized. There was a very
striking instance of this at the last
session of congress. Carlisle had
agreed to recognize Mr. Cox, of New
York, for a certain purposo. "When
tho time came, however, for Mr. Cox
to address the chair and call up his
measure, he was occupied with an
other matter. He was sitting at his
desk engaged in writing, and half a
dozen members were on their feet
clamoring to be recognized by tho
speaker, bawling out in vigorous
voice to attract tho speaker's atten
tion. Mr. Carlisle,, however, quietly
ignored those who were on their feet
claiming recognition, and said: "The
gentleman from New York, Mr. Cox,
has the floor." Mr. Cox's attention
was called to the fact and ho there
upon got up anoT presented his meas
ure. The explanation of this singular
proceeding is simple. Tho speaker
desired to recognize Mr. Cox so that
tho bill which ho brought up might
bo considered at that time, and ho
would not recognize anyone else, al
though Mn Cox had not addressed
tho chair, whilo half a dozen others
had. Such a proceeding would not
be permitted in the senate at all.
The presiding officer of that body is
held strictly to the simple parlia
mentary rule that the first senator
whom tho presiding officer hears ad
dressing him shall bo recognized.
Mr. Carlisle, however, in exercising
this authority, did nothing irore than
has been tho custom of preceding
speakers. Tho office which he held
has gradually acquired this authority
which he exercises. There are n few
questions, however, to which a mem
ber may rise at any time, and tho
speaker must recognize him. A
member may inako a point of order
at any time. Ho may rise to a ques
tion of personal privilege at any time,
but he usually announces before he
succeeds in getting recogniti&n what
his purpose is in each case.
There are other ways in which the
speaker can exercise a power which
the presiding officer of the senate does
not possess. The speaker is some
times relied upon to give a shade to
his decision which is friendly or un
friendly, as he desires, it to be, to a
measure which is being considered.
This, perhaps, is a transgression and
a fault It certainly never has been
conceded to a speaker that he may
distort a rule in favor of his party. It
certainly would never be tolerated in
the senate for the presiding officer
there to diverge from the plain inter
pretation of parliamentary law. There
have been instances, however, in the
house, where the speaker has assisted
one measure or thrown an obstaclo in
the way; of another by discovering a
hidden meaning in the" rule or giving
to it' an interpretation which was
hardlyynstifiable by'the language. It
must not, however, be considered that
the speaker has acquired any right to
juggle the rules. Although it has
been done, it has been done at the ex
pense of the dignity and character of
the man in the chair. It is not often
that an appeal is taken from a decis
ion of the speaker, but it is seldom
that he strains a point to favor his
friends that his dereliction is not
thoroughly known and exposed.
Ihe speaker has many little wavs
of advancing the fortunes of his friends
and holding in check his enemies
which the presiding officer of the sen
ate does not possess. After a century
of existence the speakership has
grown to be a great and powerful of
fice, only second to that of president
of the United States, while tho vice-
presidency has made no advance what
ever in authority and influence.
The speaker of the house is to-day
the American autocrat.
LOSS OF THE 'TORT OORDO.V
Tom Townsexd, W. T., March 6.
Chief offioe Smith, of the British bark
Port Gordon, arrived from Quinanlt
reservation at 12 o'clock to-night on the
tne Sea Lion with twelvn of thn row
He reports that the vessel was lost at 5
o'clock in the morning of February 27,
and that she careened on her port side.
The sea was breaking over the vessel and
a terrible gale was raging from the south
east and compelled the crew to lash
themselves in the riging to prevent being
washed overboard. The sea prevented
the men from lowering boats a3 each was
smasnea wnen launched.
Two seamen attempted to swim ashore.
with lines. The vessel grounded one
hundred fathoms from shore, and both
were drowned."
The officers and crew remained in the
rigging all forenoon, waiting for the sea
to subside.
Tho after house was torn away, and
made into rafts, on which four seamen
sot ashore. The vessel had a rone se
cured to shore, and began trying to get
men ashore. The steward and cook ac
cidentally fell out of the basket, and
were washed ashore and died shortly af
terwards. By night-time everybody excepting
Captain Gibbg, who remained on the
wreck for thirty-six hours, had got
ashore. No clothing or provisions were
saved. An Indian village near by sup-
plieu tne men witn lood.
On tho .second day the captain swam
ashoro, and sent word to Cape Flattery
for assistance. The first officer and nine
men commenced tho journey to Cape
Flattery, and signalled the tug Sea Lion,
and arrived here. The captain boat
swain and four men started for Gray's
narbor overland.
The vessel, on etrikintr tho sand beach.
filled with water, and the cargo shifted
to port, the sea striking fore and aft, and
sweeping every movable object from the
decks. The bark commenced going to
pieces on the first night. The cargo
principally railroad iron, brick and ce
ment caused tne vessel to settle, and tne
woodwork, rigging, etc., were strewn on
the beach.
The four dead members of the crew
were buried nsxt day by Indian". The
aeaa men are it. uaiientme, cook; Liakey,
steward; Gassey and Campbell, seamen,
all natiyes of Scotland.
The vessel and cargo are a total Ios3.
She was 133 days from Great Britain,
was loaded with railroad material for
the Ballingham railroad, near Viotoria,
was owned in Scotland, and fully in
dued. Coffee and cake, ten cents, at tho
Central Restaurant.
Ludlow's Ladies' 53.00 Fine Shoes;
also Flexible Hand turned French Kids,
at I J. Goodman's.
NEW TO-DAY.
. P. OLSON.
New Store Just Opened", Near
l.elnonw eber's Cannery.
Clothing; Men and Ladies
UNDERWEAR:
Cigars, Tobacco, Stationery, and Notion'.
Clirnp ns the ChcnpeM.
The Luiiine.
FAST TIME BETWEEN
Portland and Astoria !
LEAVE PORTLAND.
Daily, Except Saturday, at 7 A. si.
LEAVE ASTORIA,
Oraj's Dock,
Daily, Except Sunday, at 8 r. si.
jjpEgs
A Pleasing Sense of Health
and Strength Renewed, and
of Ease and Comfort
Follows tho use of Syrup of Figs, as it
acta gently on tho
Kidneys, Liver Bowels
Effectually Cleansing tho System when
Uostivo or Unions, Dispelling
Colds, Headaches and Fevers
and permanently curing
TTA-RTTTTAT. CONSTIPATION
without weakening or irritating tho or
gans on which it acts.
For Sale In COoand S1.00 Bottles by
all Xc.itllng Drucglatg.
tUXCTACTCRED OSir IT TBI
OAHTOENIA PIG SIBUP 00.
Six Feaxcisco, Cal,
Lonsvnir, Kt., Nnr Tore. N. Y. i
STAYER
NEW MARKET BLOCK,
POE.TL5.2TD, OREGON,
Carry the largest and most complete stock of the very
best and latest improved
arm, Dairy, and
ENGINES, BOILERS
Wagons, Buggies, Carriages, Carts, Harness,
And Machinery and Vehicles of Every Description.
We Guarantee our Goods the Best, and OUR PRICES THE LOWEST,
Quality Considered.
EJT'Call and see u3 or send for oar Handsomely Illustrated Catalogue, mailed
FREE on application.
Please mention this paper.
A FULL
Agents for the Celebrated
Lyon & Healy
Report of tho Condition
OF THE
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF ASTORIA,
At Astoria, in the State of Orrsm. at ihe
close of uinm-vi, I'eb uarj Colli, i&o.
liE-iOUKCK.1-.
Loan and dUc'ounU 127, VII IS
Overdrafts secured and uusecun.il. 1,139 .
U. S. Bonds tu ei-ure circuLitlmu. 12 Mi
Other stocksbonds t nd mortgages 24 319 79
Due from approved reserve agents 30,039 59
Due from other Xat'on.il lt.iuks 1,U5 7s
Due from State B.mksand bankers 21 4rto 5S
Keal estate . .. 700
Current expenses and taxes pai 173 74
l'reiHiunx paid . 2,Tuo
Checks and other c isli Items jg C2
Bills of other Banks 919
Mckels and cents 82 51
Specie 26.7J)
Legal tender notes l.wstt
ltede mptlou fund ith U. s. Treas
urer (3 per cent. of circulation) 532 50
Total
..2J4,515 85
LIABILITIES.
Capital stock paid In ....
Surplus fund .
Undivided prollts .
National bank notes out
standing .
Individual deposits sub
ject to check ......$111,192 08
Demand certificates of
S 50,000
7,500
4,2X22
9,350
deposit . 33.519 51
5182,741 59
Due to other National
banks.... . .
Due to Mate banks and
bankers ..... .
2G3C0
389 44
Total $234,515 85
State of Oregon, l
County of CUtsop. f 5S-
I. S. S. Gordon, cashier of the above named
bank, ao solemnly swear that tho above
statement Is true to the best of my knowl
edge and belief.
S. S. GORDON, Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st
day of March, 1889.
f. L. PARKER,
Notary I"ubllc
Correct Attest :
W. M. LADD. )
CIIAS. K LADD, Directors.
JACOB KAilM, J
Notice to Bidders.
SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED UN
tll March lSth 12 M.,by the Astorla& South
Coast hallway, for tblrtv thousand hewed
or sawed cross ties. 'Bids will be received
for the whole or any portion of the ties.
The company reserves the riaht to reject
any or all bids.
Specifications can bo obtained at the office
of the undersigned, to whom all bids should
be addressed.
HENRY B. THIELSEN,
Chief Eng'r and Supt. A. & S. C. Ky.
Astoria, Or.
JLnd Variety 6-ootis.
Pi B si n a TeSIIIIIIJh
lANOSiSpii
and fTSrrwl
0RGANS.&dh
1KB hi if pn
lAff HI If 1 II
ilia fl I h we Ur
Mill Machinery,
AND SAW MILLS,
STOCK OF
BEAUTIFUL IN
Tone Finish,
AND
Reasonable in Price.
Every instrument war
ranted for five years.
INSURANCE.
CAPITAL STOCK, $500,000
COLUMBIA
FIRE Ai IHE
INSURANCE CO.
mi'.'JJUvV" - Ice-l'r.!ent
JOHXA.CIIIl.il.. . he ei entry
No. 160 btfcocd St.. PurtUi.d, Or.
I. W. Case, Agent, Astoria, Or.
Ship and Commission Agency
FIRE INSURANCE
IX FIKST CLASS COMPANIES
Iteprescntlng 813,000,000
PHCENIX,
Hartford, Conn.
HOME,
New York,
AGENCY PACIFIC EXPRESS CO
.C. P. UPSHUR,
Main Street "Wharf - Astoria. OreKon.
Robb & Parker,
AGENCY OK
Fire and Marine Insurance,
With an Aggregate Capital of
$10,000,000.
IMPERIAL, of London.
CALIFORNIA, of California.
OAKLAND HOME, of Oakland.
i.iuz, oi London.
FIREMAN'S FUND, of California
Agents also for
TRAVELLERS', of Hartf ord-
TiMrot,, ia ', .v L1fe and Accident
rickets sold for the ALLAN Line of
Steamships, from Old Countto Astorii
.. KtBBrARKER.
At old office of J. o. Bozorth.
$67,000,000 Capital
n7 V, Kr" it. ",?oou & u looe. Mortn Br tlsh
Hrtf I55ant,1Ienot J11?011 an Edinburgh.
vrlSH11?1-0' Watertown. New
B, VAX iUSEjr, Agent.
Hank
the Latest Novelties,
ft
HJ1 II IB I111 ' I I I jii ! i . . . . . ...! juuiiii
! cihi. OF.I.O V. PARKER
-buy your
Groceries Provisions
-OF
Their largely Increasing trade enables
t lieni to sail at the very Tow est margin
of profit while giving you goods
that are of nrst class quality.
Goods Delivered All Over the City.
The Highest Prlco raid fur Junk.
WHOLESALE AND
Foard & Stokes
JnL w AXaUsxr.
Groceries, Provisions and Mill Feed.
Crockery, Glass Plated Ware.
0
The Largest and finest assortment of
Fresh. Fruits and "Cegetables.
Received fresh
For Sale.
Ten acres good land, improved, orchard,
house and barn and outbuilding, well sup
plied ; two wells water, within one mile of
Knappa, known as the Mitchell place.
For particulars apply to
WAHD LENT.
Knappa. Oregon.
HAVE N
BARBOUR'S
liisli Flax Threads
as
njKlWtt flJiDNFUXMILLS.USBURN.IRElW)a
rflpCV - H fl USE FOUNDED.- "S.;- -
SjhwrtJvtl ""raj
ritVTiimlf r
ir jT Ti
GRAND PRIX PARIS 1878,
AM)
GRAND CROSS OF THE LEGION D'HONNEUR.
They received the
ONLY GOLD MEDAL
For FLAX THREADS at tho
London Fisheries Exhibition 1883.
And have been awarded HIGHER PRIZES at the various
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITIONS,
man tne gooua 01 any uiuer
IN THE WORLD.
Quality Can .always be Depended on.
Euerieicefl MfflSfUse i Other.
HENRY DOYLE & CO.v
5 1 7 and 51 9 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO.
AGENTS FOR PACIFIC COAST.
W00DBERRY SEINE TWINE, ROPE and NET
TING Constantly on Hand.
TRAPS furnished to order at
Ba t HB
miiuiiui v
'B S5
CAUL A. HANSON
arker & Hanson
SUCCESSORS TO
C. L. PARKER,
DEALERS IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
New Goods Arriving Every Steamer
Tins WEEK.
WHITE GOODS
OVER 30 PATTERNS.
The Old Stand - Astoria Oregon.
RETAIL DEALER IN
every Steamer.
Net Floats
IX LOTS TO SUIT AND OF THE
BEST QUALITY,
At WILSON & FISHER'S
Sftt!Tyj
tNNA787j.
SEINES, POUNDS and
Lowest Factory Prices.
Store
o EQUAL !
Q
?SaNfe&?S

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