OCR Interpretation


The tribune independent of Michigan. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1933-1935, September 07, 1935, Image 4

Image and text provided by Central Michigan University, Clark Historical Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96076588/1935-09-07/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE FOUR

PAGE FOUR
(Hit orib®^^^EpEraknt
9 Coam> I'&PWt Cos
Terms es subscription (Payable la airaaee)
MID WIST PUBLISH IIG COMP AlfT, DVC.
9144 St Antoine, at Columbia, Detroit MJeh.
Entered aa second class matter at the Post Office at
Detroit, Michigan, under the Act of March 3, 1879
Terms of Subscription (Payable In advance)
One year. 12.00—bU months. subscriptions 12.50 a year
PHONE CLIFFORD 9994
J. Edward McCall, Editor Aaron C. Toodle, General Manager
Editorial
THE LOCAL REHOUSING PROJECT
Detroit welcomes the beginning of wyrk on the local
rehousing project on tre East Sile, which will be inaugu
rated Monday, September 9, witr elaborate ceremonies
in which Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt wll participate as dis
tinguished guest speaker. Mrs. Roosevelt is keenly inter
ested in this and similar projects for social betterment,
and her visit to our city will lend impetus to te local work
program, which has been hanging fire for many months.
Local city officials and members of the Detroit Hous
ing Commission point out that the demolition of this, the
first area selected for rehousing in our communitp, marks
the beginning of a figrt against disease, crime, juvenile
delinquency, and other unsicial influences bred in the
slums. They further tell us that environmental diseases in
this and similar local areas, during the past three years,
have been from two to eight times the city average, and
that the crime in these “blighted" areas has been ten times
above the average, and juvenile delinquency even greater.
The slum problem in any city is a community prob
lem in which\jvery citizen should be personally interested
The tax-payers always pay the bill for crime, disease and
other unsocial influences resulting from slum environ
ments in metropolitan cities.
The protection of the whole community, as Mrs. Jose
phine Goman, of the Detroit Housing Commission declares,
demands the eradication of such breeding places of dis
ease and crime. Such areas shoull be mdernized by de
molishing time-worn buildings and fire traps and replac
ing them with up to date apartments and private dwellings
available at low cost rentals.
The Tribune-Independent welcomes the inouguration
of work on the rehousing project in thisarea so largely by
members of our group This project will not only provide
modern dwellings and ideal surroundings for hundreds of
families who have hitherto been forced by economic pres
sure to reside in cheap, overcrowded, poorly-ventilated
jiml inadequately heated houses, but will like-wise pro
additional hundreds, who for months have
forced to accept welfare aid.
All in all, we believe the rehousing program in De
troit when completed will prove a highly profitable is
vestment to the community. It will make these rehabilitat
ed areas in East and West Detroit more attractive and mod
ern. and at the same time will tend to reduce the percen
tage of ( rime and disease, which is usually so prevalent in
over congested districts.
-I
TRAFFIC SLAUGHTER
Troflic deatrs on the streets of Dttroit are increasing
at an alarming rate, nitwitrstanding tre intensive safety
campaign which the local traffic ifticials have been con
ducting.
So far this year, almost two hundred men. women,
and children have list their lives in traffic accidents on our
city streets, many of Hiese casualties having been occasion
ed bp reckless driving.
Last year, the total number of local traffic deaths to
taled 2 to. During the first eight minths of the present year
however, the slaughter on our streets and higrways has
averaged twenty-five deaths a month, and if this alarming
fatality rate continues through t he four remaining months
of the year, the deaths from automobile accidents in De
troit will approximate 30ft victims in 1935, an increase of
sixtay over the total for last ytar.
What is the cause.of this increase in traffic casualties?
There are many contributing causes, among whicr are
the speed mania drunken driving; failure to observp traf
fic signals at street intersections, railroad crossings; faulty
brakes, anl so forth.
Motorists can avert a large percentage of accidents
which occur from the fore mentiosed causes, but numerous
accidents are also occasiontd by carelessness and traffic
violations on the part of pedestrians, such as J-walking;
stepping into the street from between parked automobiles,
without first looking to see that hhe way is safe; asd by
taking undue risks in attempting to rus acrss the sereet
in front of radidly approaching automobiles.
Accidents from all these causes may be greatly re
duced. by the observance of greater caution and common
sense on the part of motorists and pedestrians alike.
We appeal to all citizens—motorists as well as ped
estrians—to co-operate to the fullest extent, in the traffic
safety campaign which Commissioner Pickert and the
safety officers of our city are so zealously conducting.
Drive a bit more carefully, especially on congested
thoroughfares and in residential districts and is the vicini
ty of public schools where the streets are frequented by
children. Walk carefully too, particularly if crossing at
street intersections, and refrain frdm J-walking. If we all
co-operate in this way, there will be fewer traffic deaths
and injuries in our city.
When our streets become so unsafe, that even police
officers arerun down and killed by speeding motorists, as
was the case a few days ago; and when even our police
commissioner ia forced to dodge speeding automobiles,
while etandisg in a safety zona, it.ls little winder that ir
dera fir mire vigorous enforcement of local traffic laws
hove been Issue!, in o determined e'f.Tt to rtduce the traf
fic slaughter on iur strata. )
IHITRIB
...EDITORIALS...
JNE INDEPENDENT
AS THE EAGLE SOARS
BY (JNCLE ABE
THE HABVEBT WILL COME
Anticipation, excepting omethlng is one of life’s sweet joys. The
worst life Is the hopelese life. The life that has no tomorrow, the
life that does not look for anything, the life that loiowb no buds or
flowers.
It’s great to set your object In the distance and toll with all
your might to reach it. Day by day you are inspired with the
thought that there is a tomorrow for you that you do have some
thing to hope for.
Somehow I feel if you never attain the Joy and strength derived
from trying it is really worth the effort omehow I feel all great
lving is fed on faith. When a little boy in the South, I used to mar
vel at the tiny acorn. "Big oaks from little acorns grow." The har
vest of the acorn is the mighty towering oak. What a hope, what
a harvest, what a beautiful thing In life.
A flower is beautifful, but the process by by which God makes
it is even more beautiful. 1 think of buds. Did you ever roally study
thes little marvels? Have you watched a bud run its course? At first
u tiny ball very tightly closed, then it opens’ its little bosom to the
sun and then begins to dress up—
Colors appear to beat the rainbow. White, red, pink and all
colors. Closed In a green shell one hardly understand how all this
beauty could result from touds. Through the way of the flowers,
God teaches us a beautiful lesson of expectancy. He teaches us to
look forward to things in life.
Buds fill us with hope. They promloe »o much and their har
vest nevr falls. If you are without hope your harvest will never
come. You mußt look for it, and keep on looking for it until it
comes. That is great living.
I like to think of people as human buds. Human buds with
divine seed inside. Seed that grow and grow and grow until s
great harvest comes. Seed of love and seed of kindness have been
growing human buds until we now have hosvltals, churches, wel
fare institution and a great civilization.
The great difference betwen flfower buds and human buds is
that flower buds are but a few days, but hum HU beings may be
buds all their lives. In Tact the older they grow they can give out.
All through life they can stay In the process of unfolding, of giving
out beauty and cher. But the greatest harvest will result from the
style of living that makes fife rich for others. This means unselfish
ness. the thing for which this old world seems to be starving.
Selfishness is today our crowning sin. It is so evident every
where we go and manifested in the smallest thiDgs. Our churches
are being rocked at the bottom from this sin.
The little buds com* to serve. They make the world more liva
ble, more hautiful and more cheerful. Flowers, beautiful flowers,
on our way help so much. Human flowers of love toward all men
will help even more.
We must know, however, that that the hods of our Ifves will
never open until they are kißsed by the sunshine of love and
truth and mercy. Our lives will blossom and grow beautiful when
rv, ‘ IwNtrSour to the ; Mrv io others.
When we share our crust of bread with theMiungry that s beaut
ful When we deny ourselves to support a good cause, that is beau
tiful: When we cease to ulk about other folks and think of them
In terms of love, that is beautiful: When we dare to he right at any
cost that is beautiful* To those who live such a life the harvest
is sure to come
It is Constant
Advertising
- -0-*
That Brings
M
Results!!
Telephone
CLifford
>924
Saturday, fikpt. 7, 1936
J ?HP 3 \ f ■ *v\
Fred A. Anderson, Proprietor Anderson's
Funeral Home wro is one of Detroit's public
spirited citizens and business leaders.
Say Novice Easily Can
Handle Novel Airplane
Boston. —Here’s another step In
the search for a foolproof airplane.
It’s a novel craft being built In
Boston university's department of
aeronautics with the collaboration
of Lieut. Arthur <>. B. Metcalf.
The new plane will be able tft
land In n little more than hnlf the
distance needed by an ordinary
plane, according to Lieutenant Met
calf.
It will be tlown ns easily by a
novice as a skilled pilot file* a
conventional plane. It Is expected
that a single afternoon will be
enough to teach a beginner to han
dle the new ship with perfect
safety.
"This new plane will entirely
eliminate the need for a higher de
veloped sense of ro-ordlnation and
flying "’lnstinct.’* says tbV“7Teuten > -
Mit. “This new development will
not detract from the efficiency or
»: c ’d of the plane.”
DREAM BOOM
__ • ■’ '-*3l
At all stationery stores and news
stands get the II: I 1 :: The Lucky
Star; The Combination; The Sue
rcss: The Emergency; The Golden
and INiliey .Inc Dream Book: Prof:
Konje’s are the fastest selling
Dream Books In the
world: Send 41HM for one or 91:20
for any 2 books: no C: O: D'sj
Agents write for rash liberal terms
G: PA If 1C IS r S7O ST: NICHOLAS
AVENUEs NEW YORK; N: Y:
Clifford 0274 Hours 9 to 7 Daily!
Sundays By Appointment
4^
DR. WM. H. LAWSON
Michigan’s First Colored Regitered
Optometrist And Optician
EYES EXAMINED GLASSES FITTED
Office 405 Gratiot 20 Years
At Brush 2nd Floor Experience
THE EDITOR ASKS THAT ALL
REPORTERS GET THEIR NEWS
1 IN EARLY
Public Spirited
t •

jiV j
; V' y' seßlm6P&hH|^^L
‘uV m xßißßßflr mßß■H§gi]wKiiHftßßHK KbflH AHr it
' > m WaMßfe ; jjffr 'fl
9> '^-^■j^JSjflSCM^'
Ebenezer M* E. Church, 541 Erskine St., which is located in
the east side area where Lie slum clearance project is being piuhl
ed. Rev. George Baber is the progressive pastor..
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE
2l4dt£fc' Aritt»iii«-9tnMt, Cm— gC+lambi* Clifford 2M4
A. R E CONFAB
CONVENES IN
DETROlT
(Continued fnnn I*age 1)
Ceneral officers attending are Dr.
R. R. Wright, Jr. president of Wil
berforoe ITnfversßy and editor of
the Christiun ecorder; Dr. J. G.
Robinson of the AE M. E. Review;
Dr. L. L, Berry, secretary of mis
sions ; Dr. John Hawkins and oth
ers.
The conference is guest of the
A. M. E. Mlnsterlal Alliance, of
Detroit of which Rev. J. Arminlus
Charleston is president; and Rev.
M: J: Hendrleth. secretary;
The conference will contiune
through Sunday. September 8: The
sessions are open to all:
ATTENTION, CLUBS!
Have group pictures end newspaper cuts made
of your clubs, and wo shall be glad to publish them
for you in these columns, free of charge. f
To Seek New Church Home
Houston Hammers
Bailey On
Lynching
Now York; - Inquiring ‘whether
there are any circu instances what
ever under which North Carolina
will take action against a lyncher"
Charles If. Houston; Special Coun
of .the N. A. A. (’. »».
forwarded to Senator Josiah W
Hailey; one of the lenders in the
fililnister against the Costlgan-
Wagner Bill; a report from North
Carolina of the refusal of officials
to ask for the return of a lyncher
who; troubled by hls conscience;
offered to return to stand trial
The report; which Is confirmed
in a news item in the High Point
<N. C.) ENTERPRISE of August
l!*th; tells of the receipt by Carte
ret county officers of a loiter from
IA. P. Taylor; now of <'ortez Plor
in which Taylor stated that he had
‘ "^^^bornWelcomes s^ou si:a=sS
T *VHi n rJ^ RS - SEP,A DETROIT
'<> THE I,RAM) RE-OPENING OF THE
CHOCOLATE BAR
LIVINGSTONE STREET
S«P*®mber 7th
,TH A SENSATIONAL new show
Featuring
KMBIR (Smear Rrowa) MfJ.lmi_R« S s.RCTIER u Olkm
Music By
>«?r? | DA Ya SON S CH °COLATEERS 1
, n a A . < , ,,,, ‘ r hMrKP Fwr Mp "watlon (all TErraee i-177
... A V **?J 1 2?^ CHerry 0317
WAITERS PROGRESSIVE
LEAGUE 1938 Brush Street
■ Efficient Waiter*
President Robt. S. Davidson
Secretary—W. T. Johnwn A
utinets Mgr,-t-J, C. Underwood . R
Distinguished
IS
«
I
I
MKS. FANNIE B. PECK
president of the National House
wives an 1 the local Detroit
League who will be a guest speak
er at Women's Council at Second
Baptist Church; to be held soon.
participated in a lynehng at Beau
fort (N.C.) thirty-five years ago.
Taylor asserted that he had be
come religious and was being
troubled by his conscience. He
volunteered to return for trial and
punishment if officers wanted him
According to the North Carolina
paper the officers ‘‘‘decided it was
useless to aeiept his offer.’
Th man lynched was Louis Pat
trick who was shot nnd hanged
for the alleged slaying of Elijah
Weeks; a merchant.
It is the Association’s intention
to offer no quarter to the filibus
ters against the Oostigan-Wagner
anti-lynching bill. It proposes w
wage a reltntless warfare of ex
posure upon those responsible for
sidetracking of the bill In the ses
sion of Congress which has Just
closed. ,
TI 7
SUPPORT YOUR HOME TOWN
PAPER IT TALKS WORKS—
FIGHTS FOR YOU.

xml | txt