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Belding banner. (Belding, Mich.) 1889-1918, February 18, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96076641/1897-02-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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BELDINGr
BAWNER
EIGHTH YE All. NO. 39.
HELDING, MICH., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1897.
WHOLE NO. im
THE BKLDING BANNER!
Published Kvt-ry Thursday Afternoon
HY
COWDIN Sc 3LiA.FHA.M,
AT
lil'.LPINC, (IONIA I'D,) MK.'II.
Office In the People's Savings Hank block,
Malu strt'ct.
ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
STUKTI.Y IN ADVANCE.
THE DYING CONCRESS.
Advertising Kates upon application.
ulcnt advertising u advance.
Advertising bills collected inontlil.y. Trun-
Obltuary poetry will not be Inserted unless
paid lor. Curds of Thanks must be paid for.
Marriage and death notices fr t
Copy for i-hunge of advertisement must be re
ceived not inter than Tuesday noon In order to
Insure Insertion. J---
Kntered at the, l'ostofllce Melding, Mich., for
transmission through the mails as second class
matter.
PIIK1). If this paragraph Is marked you
will know that your subscription has ex
pired, and as our terms are strictly cash In ad
vance It will bo discontinued unless renewed.
COUNTY OFFICERS.
Circuit J udtfe Frank U. M. Davis
Probate J udgo C. L. Wilson
Sheriff V. L. Jordan
Clerk J. J. (ireen
Treasurer L. P. Spauldtntf
Prosecuting Attorney
Register of Deeds
County Surveyor
County Drain Commissioner.
Commissioner of Schools. . . .
Circuit Court Commis- )
sioners
It. Cnaddock
H. F. Strong
(I. O. lllguell
. . F. A. Palmer
Elmer It. Hale
. C. P. Locke
K. C. Spalding
CITY OFFICERS.
Mayor W. V. Hrlcker
Clerk C. K. Cowdin
Treasurer F. N. VanPelt
Marshal W. V Mitchell
City Attorney II, L. Vun Henschoten
Justices of the Peace K. It. Lapham,
W. J.Wilson.
Aldermen First w ard. ("has. Ilarroun, John W.
Moore: Second ward, K. W. Jersey, A. M.
Class; Third Ward, F.dwin Hunt, A. K. Locke.
Supervisors First ward, ('has. Kddv; Second
ward, J. T. Ang 11; Third ward, L. II. Stone.
CHURCHES.
MKTIIODIST KPISCOPAL CH UUCII-Ser-vices
at IU::)u. m. uud p. m. Sabbath School
at close of morning service. Prayer meeting on
Thursday evening. Kkv. O. J. Golden, Pastor.
CONV.KKGATIONTAL CIIUKCH-Services at
10:S)a. m. and 7:.' p. m. Sabbath School ai
11:45 a.m. Prayer meeting on Thursday eve
ning. Kev. It. V. Ciut.D, Pastor.
HAPTIST CIIUKCH-Services at 10:.H) a. m.
and 7 ..") p m. Sabbath school at close of mor
ning services. Prayer meeting on Thursday
evening. Kev. W. L. Mum; eh. Pastor.
FKF.F. METHODIST CHUKCH-Prayer and
praise service, eleven o'clock a. m. Preaching,
7:30 p. m. Prayer meeting Friday evening.
Kkv. a. (J. Hauti.e. Pastor.
H. L. VAN BENSCHOTEN.
ATTORNEY AT LAW.-Oftlce in Helding
Savings Hank lllock. Helding, Mich.
Kefekences uv Permission : Hon. Allen H.
Morse. Hi u. A. A. Kills, Thos. F. McGarry, Hon.
F. D.M.Davis.
LOCKE, MURPHY A LOCKE,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.-Do a general law
business. Practice in all Courts. Collec
ttons promptly attended to. Office: Spencer
Block, Helding. New silver Graff Block, Ionia.
E. F. BECKWITH, M. D.,
ACULIST AND Air KIST.-Special attention
J given to the tltting
phone 7. E. Main St.
ot spectacles.
loula, Mich.
Tele-
W. J. JUST,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, Ionia, Michigan.
General Law Business transacted.
ADAM WAGNER,
INSURANCE AND HEAL E ST A T K. O ttlce
Humphrey Hloek, two doors west of post-office.
. S. MORRIS,
(II TY PHYSICIAN AND HEALTH OFFI
J ('Kit.--Ortlce rear of W. I. Benedict Si t o's
drugstore. Hours : h to 11 a. in., 'i to 4 and 7 to
8 p.m. Residence opposite of M. K. church.
Telephone 11 rings.
J. E. FERGUSON,
PHYSICIAN AND SUKG HON OKEICE : At
Residence on West Main Street. Office
oours B to 10 a. m.. a to I and :.') to B p. m.
. OHLINGER,
1JHYSICIAN AND SUKGF.ON-Offlce at res
. ldence on Bridge street, ortlce hours 1 to
31 and 7 to H p. m.
J. F. PINKHAM, M. D. C. M.,
TH YSICIAN AND SIT KG KON-Office over
JL
Belding Savings Bank
Bridge and Congress Sts.
Residence corner
G. A. STANTON,
1 1HYSICIAN AND SUKGF.ON-OrriCE: Sec
ond floor, Meloche block.
to Hi a. m., 'J to 4 and 7 to s p. i
residence.
Office hours 8:30
Night call at
W. ANDREW DUTT, M. D.,
E
Offico-Beldlng Pharmacy.
a. m. I to 2 and 7 to 9 p. m
Hours-8 to 10
G. H. MILLARD,
1 KNTIsr.-OHlce over Holmes & Council's
J drutf store. Mam street, Belding, Mich. All
work guaranteed.
DR. G. F. SMITH,
T ENTIST. Office hours 8 to . 1:30. Leonard
XJ Block, over Page's hardware store, Bel
ding Mich.
h. p. Mcelroy,
tonsorial artist.
All work In my line artistically done,
lors under People's Savings Hank.
Par
Samuel Ansbnugh
TONSORIAL PARLORS.
Electric Baths. Agency Baxter Steam Laun
dry of Grand Rapid. Basement under Holmes
& Connell's. Give rue a call.
Gmnd Hapius Daily Democrat
It contains the ful. A.-ociated
patcl.es. Arrives in ".x-ldlng at 8 fto
Press dls
Delivered
by Herma Dellart at Kc a wcck toi-slz papers,
o week for seven days.
Housekeeper should try u small
brush, not too ntilT. for clear. fnir pota
toe and other roots, and save their
hands.
WM. F. SANDELL. Loan Broker. Short
time loans on any form of good security.
Long tune loans on high class real estate se- '
eurtty. Office at The Commercial Bank.
It Has Only Two Week in Which to Work
All Kiitdol Important regulation Goes
OvT to MoKlnley ITotr lion th Great
Watch Word of Ills AilinliiUtratlon -America
for Amerleau. American Inter
ests First.
Washington, 1). (,'., February 12.
(Special Correspondence. ) There are
left but LI) tlu h for the prcfcnl con
gress, If the houses meet and work
every day that is lelt. 1 lie whole mass
of appropriation bills, now in the .sen
ate committee, remain to U acted up
on. Should the senate improve every
hour available between now and March
4, it will have its hands full to get
these through. They take precedence
of everything else, but their considera
tion cannot fail to be attended by more
or less discussion, and any senator who
chooses may cause a loss of time which
might be fatal to some of them. If it
appeared that they were advancing so
rapidly us to afford' time for the con
sideration of any other measure, a sin
gle opponent of that measure could
wasty enough time to prevent its ap
pearance on the floor.
So far as the present congress is con
cerned therefore, the arbitration treaty
the Nicaragua canal bill, and all other
measures besiile the regular appropri
ation bills are as good as dead. The
immigration bill has lieen passed by
both houses, and is now in conference
ommittee to have the amendments
the house attached to it dealt with. It
is doubtful if even that measure can
be disposed of by the present cougress,
as the least opposition in the senate
could throw it over.
Many will complain because of tht
failure of their favorite measures, that
congress is so dilatory, that it wastes
too much time in discussion, and that
it does not spend enough hours every
day in session, nor days enough every
week. Uut there is really no serious
cause to grieve. The value of a ses
sion of congress to the country cannot
fairly be measured by the number of
bills it enacts into law. It depends
much upon the character of the bills.
Many sessions would have been much
more serviceable to the country than
they were, had they passed no bills at
all but the appropriations. Nor is
there any occasion to criticise the na
tional legislators for the time they
pend In apparently Idle debate. No
harm is doue by debate, even though it
be. unmarked bv extraordinary elo
quence, wisdom or Interest. Allien
harm is frequently done by the enact
ment of laws, if a measure be ol gen
uine importance to the country, and if
the people be resolved upon its enact
ment, the popular demand will be made
sufficiently manifest in course of time,
and soon enough for the general wel
fare, to force its passage.
Neither the arbitration treaty nor the
anal bill is a measure of extraor
dinary urgency. They can wait. The
next administration and the next con
gress will be quite competent to deal
with them. Had the canal bill passed
at an early day in the session, in what
a ridiculous position our government
would now find, itself in the light of
Minister Uodrigue's letter declaring
the contract upon which the bill was
based lonir atro abrogated. Had the
artjiiraiion treaty neen rail tied as
promptly as some of its friends de
manded, not only would the senate
have neglected its constitutional duty
and privilege to scrutinize such mat
ters, but wo should have found our
selves now bound to submit some of
the most vital questions that may arise
in our national affairs to the arbltra
tion of an European king, indifferent
to us and particularly, and with good
cause, sympathetic toward Great
Hritaln. The idea suggested Irom
some quarters that the Hritish govern
ment may not like it or care to accept
it as the senate may amend it, need
not frighten any one. They will take
it in any shape. As Olney and Salis
bury made it. It was unquestionably
much more valuable to them, but, as it
Is not and cannot be made of any value
whatever to us, they will not reject It,
however harmless it may be made.
One of the most peculiar features of
the present political situation is the
determined effort being made to per
suaue the Republican party, that no
matter what else it does, it must aban
don protection. It iJ contended that
adherence to that policy would be an
affront to gold Democrats who made
such a manful stand for honest money
during the recent campaign and as
sisted materially in bringing about the
election of the presidential candidates.
This journal has already dihcused
the attitude of gold Democrats, who
supK)rtcd Mr. McKinley, have given
no indication that they exfiect or ever
hoped that their supiort of the Ke
'publican candidate would induce his
party to abandon one of the cardinal
points of its creed
Nor will it. If one thing is clearly
understood, It is that the American
jM-oplo at the present time are clearly
protection. The experience of the
country since ISM with even the modi
fied free trade has been sufficient.
Under the most advantageous circum
stances the Democratic party was per
mitted to try Its experiment. It be
gan wniie me couuiry was enjoyiug
unprecedented prosperity. If there
was ever a chance to demonstrate the
lsmeficence of the so-called "tariff re
form" that was the time.
Hut instead of prosperity there was
immediate prostration of the material
Interests of the land. Business went
to pieces; mills and factories were
closed; the army of the unemployed
grew to alarming proportions; great
strikes broke out In various parts of
the country, and generally a disturbed
condition of affairs was brought aboutf
which bore heavily on rich and poor
alike..
The spirit of discontent grew and
crystallzed in political demands which
threatened the very perpetuity of the
republic. Under our form of govern
ment H)pular discontent is certain to
take ularming shapes, and we have
seen it conclusively demonstrated that
nothing ia so provocative of opular
discontent as governmental policies
which take work and bread from Amer
icans to give them to workmen in
other lands who are ready to work for
less than Americans receive.
The essence, the vital spirit of the
Republican policy of protection pro
poes to look Ilrst alter tne interest,
and welfare of the American workmen,
and then, if thero is anything left to
give it to the foreigner. Hut America
for Americans, and American interests
first.
These considerations effectually dis
pose of all thoughts of the abandon
ment of the American policy of protec
tion. It will not be abandoned, but on
the contrary, it will be strengthened
whenover additional strength is need
ed. tJIIAS. r I'IKKCF.
MORE AdOUT COUNTERFEITERS.
(rai and llauck's Examination. The
Twenty Dollar Itllls Were Good
Imitations.
There has been no new developments
in the counterfeiting cases since last
week except the examination of Simp
son Craig and Ferd Hauck. It is hint
ed however since the confession of
Peter VVitzel that the end is not yet
and that several more are to be pinch
ed by government detectives. The
confession and testimony of Witzel
was a great surprise to the defense and
came like a clap ol in under irom a
clear sky. Helow we give his evidence
in the Craig examination held in
Crand Hapids which is practically the
same as he gave before Albert Wil-
liaus the United States Commissioner,
in Ionia in Mr. llauck's case. The
latter was held to appear before the
grand jury and the ball was increased
to$l00. Mr. Hauck claims that he
will lie able to prove himself innocent
in his trial. That the twenty dollar
bills manufactured from the plates
were good imitations of the genuine is
proved by the fact that one of them
cut quite a figure circulating among
some of our business men about a year
ago, passing around as a sort of a joke
without suspicion of its genuineness,
but which was afterward withdrawn
from circulation:
Simpson Craig, the member of the
Kingston counterfeiting gang arrested
in Jackson, was held to the grand jury
by Commissioner McQuewan Wednes
day afternoon. The main witness
against Craig, and the one on which
the authorities will rely, was I'eter
Witzel, the railroad man who testified
in the morning against John Del'ree.
Witzel said he lirst met Craig in
Helding in 1895, when DePrce, Craig
and Ferd Hauck gathered in the lat
ter s saloon and in Craig s rooms just
back of the saloon and talked over
matters. Witness said he told Hauck
and Craig that DePreo was making
some plates to print $20 bills and they
said if the bills were good enough they
would put up some money to help com
plete the work. Craig and Hauck
were asked to go in because those who
knew aliout tho affair and were work
lag In the gang had run out of money.
About a week later DePree came to
Ionia and witness and he drove over to
Helding. This time DePree had one
of the engravings and a proof taken
from the engraved block or plate
Hauck and Craig looked them over
and decided they could handle money
printed Trom tho plate inter it was
completed. Thev both claimed to
know places In Chicago and other
large cities where they could sell
plenty of It. Afterward Hauck and
Craig both furnished money to aid in
the work of perfecting the plates and
buying a press.
United States District Attorney
Power and Mr. Hubbell, Craig's attor
ney, had a tilt over a conversation
which Mr. Hubbell had with the wit
ness Witzel Tuesday morning. Mr.
mi
Absolutely Puro.
Celebrated for Its Kreat leavening strength
and healthfulness. Assures the food against
alum and all forms of adulteration common to
the cheap brands.
KoVAL Ha kino powpek co., Mew Yora.
Power declared It was a dangerous
and firmly committed to the theorv, of thing to Interview a government wit
ness, and Mr. Hubbell explained that
he did not know Witzel was a witness
for the government at tho time he
talked with him.
Witzel Bwore Mr. Hubbell met him
at the depot In tho morning and
advised him to keep mum. Ho had
6een Craig examining a nearly finished
$20 bill during the Helding conference
and swore to his having expressed his
williugness to put up money to carry"
on the work, lie did not see tne
money paid over, but DePree had told
him it was. Witness had never seen
Craig in possession of counterfeit bills
except when examining the one at
Helding. Afterward Craig told wit
ness that tne Klngstons had played
him a dirty trick by leaving Ionia
without giving him any of tho coun
terfeits.
The attorneys for tho defense again
made an ineffectual effort to show that
Witzel had been offered clemency in
exchauge for his evidence, but with
tho same result as before. Then Dis
tiict Attorney Power turned tho tables
by quietly asking Witzel: "Were you
not approached this morning by some
of Mr. Craig's attorneys?"
4Ves, sir. Hy that gentleman
there," pointing to Mr. Hubbell.
'What did ho say to youV"
"Well, wo had a little conversation
and I told him I was going to tell the
whole truth. He advised mo not to."
TUie reply caused something of astir
in the room and Mr. Hubbell instantly
demanded: "Do you mean to say that
I told you not to tell the truth on this
stand?"
Witzel rather confusedly admitted
that he had not used these words, but
had advised him "to keep mum." Mr.
Hubbell claimed he did not know at
the time that Witzel was a witness for
the government and visited him foi
tho purpose of securing him for a client
if possible. The commissioner decided
that no offense had been committed
and the examination proceeded.
Craig declined to take the stand in
his own behalf. Mr. Hubbell moved
that he Ikj discharged on the ground
that his having had any part in the
manufacture and handling of the coun
terfeits was not proven. Commissioner
McQuewan declined to take that view
of the case and then Mr. Hubbell made
a plea to have the bail lowered to
$1,000 or 2,0b0, figures at which Craig
might secure temporary liberty.
The court held that Craig's offense
did not seem to be quite as serious as
that of DePree's. but nevertheless he
did not feel warranted in naming bail
less than 2.r-00. The attorney stated
that Craig's family was ill, but tho
$2,500 bail stood as originally ordered.
Craig was unablo yesterday to secure
tho necessary bondsmen and was taken
back to jail.
Jerry has been talking some more
as tho following from the Coldwater
Courier is evidence: Jerry Hoynton
was in town tho latter part of last
week on railroad business, and assured
the Courier the Central Michigan
would be built this year, from Grand
Haven to Sandusky, (). It will be seen
by this that the eastern terminal has
been changed from Fostoria, O., to
Sandusky. Hy this change not only
the system of all the trunk and branch
lines are connected that lead to tho coal
fields of Ohio and Pennsylvania, as
well as to the sea board, but also will
connect a line of lake boats from
Sandusky to Huffalo. Mr. Hoynton as
sures the Courier that the lioats from
Grand Haven to Milwaukee Is con
traded for and terminal and dockage
at both places is secured. Tho road
east from Coldwater strikes Napoleon
O., Howling Green, Fremont and then
Sandusky. If the lino is built, any
reasonable sum the county and city
might contribute would eomo back
directly or Indirectly t the contribu
tors lieforc the work of construction
on the line was finished. Tho Cham
ber of Commerce, of Milwaukee, had
sent a competent man over tho lino
from Grand Haven to Hattle Creek
with Mr. Hoynton, and definite action
will be taken as soon as he returns and
makes his report.
c n n rrnrrxnrrnrrnr nr rrrn rt tr. r r crcrrnrrrcrr
Spring is Coming !
SEE THE
GRAND LINE
OF DRESS
CAMBRICS
AND WASH
. GOODS AT
. J. Leonard's
What is it ?
Come and see Granose
Flakes. Something new
to eat. It is Fine.
5 Trv a Sack of
ttlllttlt.&.U.lKlltl.)tilti
to
to
to
to
ftoss Rose Flour.
Put up Expressly for us.
to
to
to
to
If you are not drinking
Chase k Sanborn's Tea and Coffee
You are Drinking Something
Inferior and not Superior.
Kobinson c Hudson.
Sheriffs Sale 6oods!
$1,000 worth of clean new shoes bought at Sheij
sale and will be closed out at
One-Half Their Value,
This is a great opportunity to buy your shoes
present and future use. There are no better make:
shoes, and we do not want to put a pair of them
our shelves but close them out at what they will bri
We bought them at a price so we can afford to do t
Come in and see these goods whether you wish to
now or not.
THE CITY SHOE ST0R
IS. K. SVnXCMi, lrpricUr.
"THE MIND HATH A THOUSA
' EYES,
The heart but one," but the ocu
no matter how expert, cannot r
cdy their defects. Fortunately
optics for outward observation
have their natural defects remec
by such an expert and skilled (
list as RICAHY. Your eyes wil
tested and glasses fitted so
failing eyesight will be restored
defects of vision cured.
The Commercial Jxiiic.
WE
UKCKI VK ComrmTcUl DepoItn Subject to Check.
ISSUK Certlttcnt' of Deposit payable on demand, upon whl
puv 4 per cent Interest.
ISSUK Certificates of Deoostt payable at fixed date upon
we pay special rates or lnierewt.
COM.llcT at any available point In the world.
SKLli Domestic Kxchanie and inxue through Illinois Trust
Savings Hank. Chicago, drafts available In any and all
pean countries. LOAN money at current rates.
HUY City Orders. WKITK Insurance In first class compi
INVITE you to become our customer.
Open Kvenlngs until nine o'clock.
C. E. HILLS, Cashh
O US FOR
H PRINTING
COWDIN & LAP1IAM

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