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Charlevoix county herald. (East Jordan, Mich.) 189?-1953, August 26, 1921, Image 6

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THIS CHARLEVOIX COUNTY HERALD, (East Jordan, Midi.) FRIDAY, AUGUST 2G, 1921
By Elmo
Scott
Vatson
, Western Newspaper Union.
DANIEL BOONE. THE GREAT
KENTUCKIAN
Daniel Boone w.. ilie son of Quaker
parents who lived in Pennsylvania. Al
though the principal doctrine In the
Quaker creed Is that man must not
kill, Daniel departed from the faith of
his fathers early and he became one
f the greatest Indian fighters In
American history.
"When Boone was eighteen his par
ents moved to North Carolina and In
the Yadkin valley of that state, young
Boone became an expert woodsman
and hunter. Attracted by the tales of
a hunter who had crossed the Appa
lachians into the unknown Kentucky
country, Boone visited the Blue Crass
state several times until he finally de
cided to make that country his home.
In 1775 he etsabllshed Boonesborough,
the first outpost of civilization in the
"Dark and Bloody Ground," as Ken
tucky was called because it was a bat
tleground for many tribes of Indians.
Boone's adventures with the Indians
in his new home were Innumerable. In
1778 he was captured by the Shaw
nees, who admired the scout's courage
bo much that he was not put to death.
Instead Chief Black Fish adopted him,
giving him the name of Big Turtle
rather an Inappropriate title for a man
so active. Boone pretended to be well
pleased with his captivity and after
several months the watchfulness of
the savages relaxed. Then he made
his escupe.
Several years later this same band
of Shawnees came to Boonesborough
to kidnap their former captive. They
found Boone In a little shanty used
for drying tobacco.
"Now Boone, we got you," said the
Indians. "You no get away this time."
'.'Yes, you have me but I am glad to
go 'with you," replied the scout, "but I
want my friends to have some of this
tobacco."
lie gathered up a number of the
dryest leaves and, unseen by the In
dians, crushed them In his hands. Be
fore they could move, he threw the
powdered tobacco Into their eyes. As
the blinded savages rolled on the floor
howling and dicing at their eyes, the
former "Big Turtle" showed unex
pected speed and was far up the trail
to the fort before they could pursue
him.
In his later years Boone was cheat
ed out of the rich Kentucky lands he
had fought so hard to win and he mi
grated to Missouri, becoming a hunter
once more. He died there in 1820 at
the age of eighty-six. A quarter of a
century later Kentucky paid him be
lated honor by removing his body to
the capital of the state and today Dan
iel Boone sleeps In the land where he
won fame as a pioneer and scout.
Stories of
Great Scouts
By Elmo
Scott
Watson
, Western Newspaper Union.
SIMON KENTON, THE AMERI
CAN MAZEPPA
Second only to the name of Daniel
Boone whose life he once saved Is
written in the annals of Kentucky the
name of Simon Kenton. Kenton was
a Virginian who served as a scout In
Lord Dunmore's war shortly before
the outbreak of the Revolution and
who crossed over the mountains Into
the "Dark and Bloody Ground" of Ken
tucky In seurch of adventure. Ills ex
ploits there soon won for him the un
dying hatred of the Indians and no
less than eight times he was captured
by them and sentenced to death.
In 1778 Kenton with two compan
ions went north into Ohio to spy upon
a tribe at war with the whites. While
returning, they came upon a herd of
Indian horses. The Kentucklans re
solved to take some of the animals
along as trophies of the successful ex
pedition. The Indians quickly discov
ered the theft and overtook the scouts
Just before they crossed the Ohio
river.
One of the Kentucklans was killed,
another escaped but Kenton was taken
prisoner.
"You steal Injun hosa?" they taunt
ed him. "All right, we give you ride
on hlml"
So they tied the scout on a wild
young horse and set It free In the for
est, lie finally was taken from the
horse's back more dead than alive.
At the first village the Indians
reached, they condemned the scout to
Stories of
Great Scouts
MICKIE, THE PRINTER'S DEVIL
" ( loovvt gw& a look. at )
i uhat ocwed
mojell! ) aitA
run the" gantletl" When the signal was
given, Kenton sprang through the line
of warriors, armed with clubs and
hatchets, and reached the council
house, his goal, almost untouched.
Near Zanesfleld preparations were
made to burn him at the stake, but the
arrival of Simon Glrty, the "white
renegade," who recognized Kenton as
an old friend, saved him.
His freedom was short-lived. Three
weeks later the Indians again voted
to put him to death. Again he was
saved by a friend Chief Logan, the
noted orator of the.Cayugas. When
the Sandsky towns were reached, the
Indians held a council and once more
decreed the death penalty. Kenton
was tied to the stake. Just as the
torch was being applied, a British of
ficer appeared and demanded the sur
render of their prisoner to his com
mander at Detroit.
Kenton was kept captive In Detroit
until 1779, when through the aid of an
Indian trader's wife he escaped to
Kentucky where he died in 1830.
Stories of
Great Scouts
By Elmo
Scott
Watson
, Western Newspaper Union.
"JOHNNY APPLESEED." SCOUT
WHO PLANTED ORCHARDS
Not all of the great scouts were In
dian fighters. In contrast to the ca
reer of Lewis Wetzel, who was some
thing of a professional Indian killer,
is the life of John Chapman or
"Johnny Appleseed." Chapman never
killed an Indian In his life, but he
probably saved as many white men
from death at their hands as Wetzel
did.
Chapman first appeared on the Ohio
frontier in 1S06. He came floating
down the Ohio river In a canoe, tow
ing another, and both boats were load
ed with apple seeds from the cider
mills of Pennsylvania. Ills purpose
was to plant the seeds In the wilder
ness so that orchards would be started
for the settlers when they arrived
there to make their homes.
For the next 30 years he went every
where up and down the Ohio country,
planting seeds, going from one orchard
to another, pruning and caring for the
young trees. He was a welcome vis
itor In the Jog cabins of the settlers
for he always carried a Bible nnd
some books from which he would read
and preach to them before the blazing
fireplaces In the evening.
Johnny practiced his teachings of
humility and kindness. He never killed
anything for food. He carried a kit
of cooking utensils, Including a mush
pan, which he sometimes wore as a
hat. Usually he wore a broad-brimmed
black hat, but a coffee sack with arm
holes cut In it was his only coat.
White men called him "queer," for
he often went barefoot In winter as
well as In summer, but the Indians
said, "He has been touched by the
Great Spirit." He went everywhere
among them unharmed, for the fact
that Johnny never carried a gun con
vinced them that he was under the
special protection of the Ma'nito.
During the War of 1812 when the
British were overrunning the Ohio
country, Johnny Appleseed performed
his greatest service for his people. In
his wanderings among the tribes he
often learned of their plans for at
tacks on the settlements. Where no
other white man could have gone,
Johnny passed In safety and more
than once he carried warnings to the
settlers, giving them time to prepare
for defense before the red invaders
swept down upon them.
All this time Johnny Appleseed was
carrying out his cherished dream of
making Ohio bloom with fruit trees
and many of the finest orchards in
that state today owe their beginnings
to this strange man. In his later years
Johnny left the country which he had
helped beautify and went to live with
a relative In Fort Wayne, Ind. He
died in 1847.
FIND OIL FIELDS IN ALASKA
California Prospecting Party Reports
Important Discovery.
Nome, Alaska. Discovery of new
oil fields near Wainwrlght Inlet and
Point Barrow on the Arctic coast of
Alaska, which it is believed here may
rival In Imporance the MacKenzie
river fields of Northern Canada, was
reported August 21 by members of a
California prospecting party which
has been in the district since July 14.
This Isn't a Lost Art.
The art of coversation as it is now
generally practiced : Talking much and
sying little.
r
Vc. V ?fcTTV GOOD
.
SPECIAL RATES GRANTED LEGION
Railroads Reduce Fares fcr Conven
tion at Kansas City.
Kansas City, Mo. Four more rail
roads have announced a special rate
Df one cent a mile for members of the
American Legion and the Women's
Auxiliary who attend the legion's an
nual national convention at Kansas
City October 31 to November 2. The
additional lines granting the special
rate are Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, Wabash, Illinois Central and
Chicago & Great Western.
The roads which up to date have
offered tho special rate are, besides
those mentioned, the Frisco, Kansas
City Southern, Missouri Pacific and
the Rock Island.
EX-JUROR SEEKS PROTECTION
Home of Former Grand Jury Mem
ber Bombed Second Time.
Chicago. Ferdinand WTinkler, CC21
South Lincoln street, is beginning to
think that grand Jury service is ex
pensive. For the second time within
a month his bungalow was partly
wrecked by a bomb. "I was on the
federal grand Jury that indicted 'Big
Tim' Murphy," Winkler told the po
lice. "We also handled a few cases
of building indictments. That's the
only reason I know of why 1 should
be bombed. I'm going to lay the mat
ter before Judge Landis and ask him
for government protection.
DAREDEVIL AIR STUNTS
GALORE AT STATE FAIR
The world famous aviator, Al Wil
ion; the Jersey Rlngel Aerial Circus;
ind "The Rileys", balloonists and
parachute Jumpers, will join in fur
aishing crowds at the State Fair in
Detroit, Sept. 2 to 11, with thrills
that will hold them breathless.
The airplane stunts will include
looping the loop while standing up
right on top of the plane, walking on
wings of the plane while in flight,
changing from plane to plane in mid
air, racing with motor cars around the
mile track, picking up passenger from
motor car by airplane, parachute
lumps from airplanes and numerous
other death-defying acts that require
both consummate skill in the handling
of the air craft and intrepidity as well
as nerves of steel on the part of the
stunt artists.
Another spectacular airplane stunt
that is beautiful as well as thrilling
Is night flying with fireworks. This
will feature the evening programs at
the fair grounds.
Balloon ascensions, always of in
tense Interest, will be featured this
year by "The Rileys" special act, a
triple parachute Jump from a balloon
more than a mile up in the air. If you
like thrills, you'll get them in heap
ing measure at the state fair.
More fun at the State Fair In De
troit, Sept. 2-11, than jou ever taw
before.
I' p"
ARTHUR
PETERSON.
Escanaba man who is Michigan
State Fair Board member In charge
of tho exhibits of plants and flowers,
one of the most delightful features
of the many displays at the state fair
in Detroit, Sept. 2-11. Premium awards
are offered in his department to both
professionals and amateurs, attract
ing many beautiful exhibits.
The Midway at the state fan in
Detroit, Sept. 2-11, will be the fun
center of the universe.
Definition De Luxe.
A good citizen is one who would rath
er bend his will than break the law.
hy diaries Sughroe
Wmoi Nmpim Uraoa
NOO DAW OH. SURE t
M g
to a
v
A pipe's a pal packed with P A.!
Seven days out of every week you'll get real smoke
joy and real smoke contentment if you'll get close-up
to a jimmy pipe! Buy one and know that for yourself!
Packed with cool, delightful, fragrant Prince Albert, a
pipe's the greatest treat, the happiest and most appe
tizing smokeslant you ever had handed out!
(You can chum it with a pipe and you will once
you know that Prince Albert is free from bite and
parch! (Cut out by our exclusive patented process!)
Why every puff of P. A. makes you want two more;
every puff hits the bullseye harder and truer than the
last! You can't resist such delight!
And, you'll get the smokesurprise of your life when'
you roll up a cigarette with Prince Albert ! Such entic
ing flavor you never did know ! And, P. A. stays put be
cause it's crimp cut and it's a cinch to roll! You try it!
N3T THE ONLY GNE
There Are Other East Jordan People
Similarly Situated.
Can there be any stronger proot
offered than the evidence of East
Jordan residents? Alter you have
read the following, quietly answer
the question.
Erie Farmer, railroad engineer,
East Jordan, sayw: "Seven years
ago I had an awful lame back. I had
a eore feeling right across the small
of my back that stayed with me for
days. I had stitches In my back when
I wasn't able to move at all and my
back was always lame. When l
stooped over I could hardly get up
again. I surely was in a poor shape.
Mornings I felt so tired I hardly haa
enough strength to get up. DlacTi
specks came before me and were 0
thick at times I couldn't see. Through
the night I often had to get up and
the secretions were not only painfu?
but always filled with dark sediment.
I heard of Doan'a Kidney Pills and
got a few boxes at Gidley & Mac'r
Drug Store and they fixed me up in
good shape."
GOo, at all dealers. Foster-Milburn
Co., Mfrs., Buffalo, N. Y.
Weighing the Earth.
The naval observatory suys the
mass of the earth has been deter
mined by means of the Torsion bal
ance, an instrument for measuring
very minute forces. Ily means of this
instrument the attractive force of a
large metal bull is accurately meas
ured, and by comparing this force with
the earth's attraction the mass of the
earth may be ascertained.
Simple Solution.
"Sages tell us that the best way to
get the most out of life Is to fail In
love with a great problem or a beautiful
woman." "Why not choose the latter
and get both?" Amherst L'ord Jeff.
Had Enough of That Kind.
"As a skilled laborer," said Uncle
Eben, "I'm entitled to a helper, but
I'd rather go wlfout dan have any
mo' such successful crashooters as
de last one."
(nea.h.oox the
) VOU GOT to Hua J
V EASIEST
the national joy" smoke
Credit May Belong to Aztecs.
The question whether Uoer Macon
used a telescope and a microscope, re
vives the contention as to whether It
was not in Mie New World that both
these instruments were first invented.
For antiquarians who have studied ex
tant hieroglyphic codices of the Aztecs
say this race when overthrown by the
Spanish conquerors was more ad
vanced in astronomy and optics than
Europe of that day.
Jud Tunkins.
Jud Tunkins says the genuine op
timist is recognized by his cheerful
ness at work and not by the exuber
ance of h's recreation.
DRil MORE
If
Eat leas meat and take Salts for Back
ache or Bladder trouble
Neutralizes acids.
Una acid in meat excites the kidneys,
they boeome overworked; got Bluggiflh,
ache, and feel like lumps of lead. The
urino becomes cloudy; the bladder is irri
tated, and you may be obliged to seek re
lief two or three times during the night.
When tho kidneys clog you must help
them flush off the body's urinous waste
or you'll bo a real sick person shortly.
At first you feel a dull misery in the kid
ney region, you suffer from backache,
sick headache, dizziness, stomach gets
sour, tongue coated and you feci rheu
matic twinges when the weather is bad.
Eat less meat, drink lots of water;
also get from any pharmacist four ounces
of J ad Salts; take a tablespoonful
in a glass of water before breakfast
for a few days and your kidneys will
then act fine. This famous salts is made
from the acid of grapes and lemon juice,
combined with lithia, and has been used
for generations to clean clogged kidneys
and stimulate them to normal activity,
also to neutralize the acids in urino, so
it no longer is a source of irritation,
thus ending bladder weakness.
Jad Salts is inexpenaive, cannot in-
Jure; makes a delightful effervescent
ithia-water drink which everyone should
take now and then to keep the kidneys
clean and active. Druggists here say
they sell lots of Jad Salts to folks who
believe in overcoming kidney trouble
while it is only trouble.
mm
bother
What Would We Do Without the Eighteenth Amendment?
s
GOT A HOV
OF JOKES
i . . .
Js
Primes AlUrt Is
mold in toppy rod
bogs, tidy rod tins,
hand soma pound
and halt pound tin
humidors and in tho
pound crystal glass
humidor with
spongs molstsnsr
top
Copyrtf ht 1921
hy R. J. Reynold
Tobacco Co.
Wlaston-SaJtm,
IF Hi IS
GRAY, USE SAGE TEA
Here's Grandmother's Recipe to
Darken and Beautify
Faded Hair.
That beautiful, even shade of dark, i
glossy hair can only be had by brew-V
ing a mixture of Sage Tea and Sul-'
phur. Your hair Is your charm. It
makes or mars the face. When It
fades, turns gray or streaked, Just an
application or two of Sage and Sul
phur enhances its appearance a hun
dredfold. Don't bother to prepare the mix
ture; you can get this famous old
recipe improved by the addition of
other Ingredients at a small cost, all
ready for use. It is called Wyeth's
Sape and Sulphur Compound. This can
always be depended upon to bring
back the natural color and lustre of
your hair. o
Everybody uses "Wyeth's" Sage and
Sulphur Compound now because It
darkens so naturally and evenly that
nobody can tell It has been applied.
You simply dampen a sponge or soft
brush with it and draw this through
the hair, taking one small strand at a
time: by morning the gray hair has
disappeared, and after another appli
cation It becomes beautifully dark and
appears glossy and lustrous. This
ready-to-use preparation is a delight
ful toilet requisite for those who de
sire dark hair and a youthful appear
ance. It is not intended for the cure,
mitigation or prevention of disease.
He "Fell for It."
"Home," Hiys a contemiKjrary, "Is
the place for real courtship." It used
to be, in the days of horsehair sofas
built for two. We remember one be
side a window outside which a big
rosebush perfumed the air. The sweet- 1
ness of the girl, the beauty of the Y'
roses, and the balmy air of spring
were an irresistible combination. We
swallowed the hook. Chicago Journal
of Commerce.
Luxuries in Less Demand.
There's a vast difference between
eating to live and living to eat. Thia
Is being discovered by a great many
people. In a measure discovery ac
counts for lessening demand for lux
uries yet doesn't supply the funds for
necessities. One can't spend dollars
and have them too. Grit.
- U
n i

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