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The daily monitor leader. [volume] (Mount Clemens, Mich.) 1942-19??, July 24, 1942, Image 12

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-FRIDAY —JULY 24,1942
12
Nazis Try to Salvage Ships Sunk off European Coast
Suspect Denies
Assault Charge
Nogro Hild on
SIO,OOO Bond
Willie “Fata” Clark, 24, col
ored, of 444 Clinton, Detroit,
was held in the county jail to
day in default of SIO,OOO bond
after he pleaded innocent yes
terday before Justice Frank E.
Jeannette to charges he crimi
nally attacked a 39-year-old
white woman.
Justice Jeannette set Tuesday
at 10 a. m. as the date for ex
amination.
Clark is charged with attack
ing the woman Sunday on a
lonely road behind Gowanie
Golf Club while her drunken
husband, also 39, staggered
nearby.
m
CAR STOLEN
Cecil Byington, 332 Cass,
yesterday reported the theft of
his car from in front of Cover
ed Wagon.
Normally, all humans have 4 12
pairs of ribs.
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Rambling Reporter
APPLICATION APPROVED
Because the ration board
approved his request for a
new tire and tube Thursday,
William Huff, of 19 Mile road,
Utica, today has only one of
the original tires on the 1924
Ford stake truck he drives to
market.
Until the board heeded his re
quest, Huff used two of the or
iginal tires, both 18 years old.
After one of the two developed a
fabric break, he made applica
tion for a new tire to replace it.
Kirk L. Michael, of Utica,
made this inspection report:
“Rear right tire in fair condi
tion—ls years old. Rear left
tire: break in fabric, six inches
long cannot be repaired.
Tube in rear left tire is por
ous and has many patches—lß
years old.”
Ration Board Administrator
Maxwell Case made this com
ment: “The thrift of the appli
cant should serve as an object
lesson to many car owners ask
ing for new rubber for those
less than one year old. The ra
ton board takes this opportunity
to commend Mr. Huff. His ap
plication was approved.”
HE HITCHED A RIDE
Ration Board member Har
old Engelman, of New Balti
more, was headed for a board
meeting when a front tire,
previously vulcanized, blew
out. When he opened his
trunk compartment door for
his spare, he found it flat.
Harold hitch-hiked back to
New Baltimore, borrowed a
friend’s car and reached the
EASY WAYS TO SAVE
when you cook on your
ELECTRIC RANGE
In these days when "waits nothing" is a household
rule, you can savt time, effort and electricity by using
your rango efficiently. Tho 5 suggestions listed below
are not new: Perhaps you already follow them. If not,
they will prove worthwhile.
(1) Use LOW heat whenever possible. You con
keep your cooking cast down by finishing most of your
surface cooking on low hoof after foods have reached
the steaming point. the steaming point is reached,
you cannot speed up the cooking operation one bit
by continued use of high heat. Reducing the heat will
reduce your cooking costs, as well as conserving vita
mins and minerals.
(2) Han more even meals. Preparing a complete
meal in the oven at one time is economical: The same
amount of electricity can cook meat, potatoes, vege
tables and a pudding in one operation. And by using
your clock control, you can forget the dinner until it is
ready to serve, ond devote your time to other things.
(3) Use little water in cooking. Vegetables are
for more delicious and healthful when "steam-cooked"
In only haff-a-cup of water. This conserves precious
minerols and food values —and you don't waste elec
tricity heating up a large quantity of water which is
poured down the sink after the cooking is finished.
(4) Make use of “stored” heat. When the cook
ing operation is almost finished, the heat may be
turned completely Off. The heat that remains in tho
unit con be used to complete the cooking operation.
Take advantage of this method and the extra saving
In the use of electricity
(5) Use tho thrift cooker often. If your range has
one, the thrift cooker is ideal for soups, stews, and for
less tender cuts of meat. Its long, slow cooking gives
excellent results, and its "deep well” construction ond
heavy insulation achieve economy of operation.
Srmd 1m frm k»*kUt — "Th* Cm* mU t’w •/ Mretrit Appitsmtn "
CM m mrtt* mj Burnt Cdmrm rffur.
THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY
meeting 40 minutes late. Harold
then sat at the meeting for three
hours, gave out approximately
100 tires but could not get one
for himself.
OLD CROWD INVITES
T. Trufant Shoemaker, long
secretary of the Old Crowd,
asks all members to notify
him whether or not they plan
to attend the annual reunion
on Thursday, Aug. 20. Mean
while, Tony Keils. George
Dankers, Frank Ullrich, Stan
Cady and other members of
the Old Crowd band already
are practising for the annual
parade.
RAMBLING REPORTER
Chief of Police Art Rosso may
ask the City Commission to turn
on street lights in the parks. It
seems the lovers and loveresses
make so much noise in the parks
that neighbors are complaining.
Just what effect light has as a
noise deterrent is problematical.
Harold “Bugs” Lindsey now
rates with Hester Posner
and Stuey DeMott as a poet.
“Bugs” mailed his most re
cent effort to Trudie Pratt,
just before she left for train
ing with the WAAC Inci
dentally, a second local wo
man, who works in Detroit,
almost made the grade as an
officer candidate.
There’s no foundation to the
rumor the city plans to clean up
the playground outside the USO
Club That sign containing
names of all men in service is
still in the “planning stage.”
—E. D. R.
5
Selfridge Field
Private Draws
$l4O Monthly
Probably one of the highest
paid privates in the Air Corps is
stationed at Selfridge Field.
Starting Nov. 1, 1942, Uncle Sam
will pay him $l4O a mon\h.
Most privates receive SSO a
month. But Pvt. Theodore Roy,
42, of this field will get $lO less
per month than the base pay of
the lowest grade commissioned
officer, a second lieutenant. And
there is a mighty good reason for
Pvt. Roy’s big pay; a wife and
six children.
Seventeen years ago Pvt. Roy
was a member of the 21st Infan
try division at Ft. Sam Houston.
Tex. Recently, he was restored
to duty in the Air Corps and as
signed to Selfridge Field. Now
that the government is making
provisions for soldier’s depend
ents, he is ready to carry on
where he left off 17 years ago.
The War Department pays a
wife SSO a month and $lO for
each child except the first for
whom sl2 is allowed. Twenty
two dollars of the SSO is con
tributed by the soldier. A sta
tionary engineer before re-en
tering the army, Pvt. worked in
a Mount Clemens greenhouse.
Inasmuch as the government will
not start making dependency
payments until November 1, wife
Ruth and six children will draw
on his savings for their present
support.
The family resides at 145 Bar
bara St., Mount Clemens. Mrs.
Roy is 35 years old and the
children are Eursule, 3; Thelma,
4; Norman, 5; Claudette, 8; Ni
cholas, 10, and Louis, 14. Pvt.
Roy reads and writes French,
was born in Newport, County of
Gaspe, Quebec, Canada. He has
resided 14 years in Mount Clem
ens.
Chief Justice
Denies Report
on Rubber Probe
SUGAR HILL, N. H., July 24
(#) Chief Justice Harlan F.
Stone said today that he did not
intend to accept the task of
making an independent inquiry
in the rubber situation to end
present controversies over the
problem.
Here for his summer vacation,
the Chief Justice, when told
stories had been published to
the effect that President Roose
velt had asked him to make
such an inquiry, said:
“I -haven’t accepted any such
responsibility and I do not in
tend to.”
The New York Times, in a
Washington dispatch, said that
President Roosevelt had been
counseled to nominate someone
in whom the public would have
full confidence to get to the
bottom of the situation, so that
an official policy could be based
on the findings.
The Chief Justice said he had
no further comment on the re
port.
New International
Bridge at Le Saul!
LANSING, July 24 (IP)
The state highway department
disclosed today it was going
forward with preliminary
studies of the feasibility of a
new international bridge across
the St. Mary’s river at Sault Ste.
Marie.
The department called for
bids to be opened here July 29
at 10 am. for foundation bor
ings and soundings at bridge
sites.
Auto Repairing
Expert mechanics at your
service on all types of
auto repairing.
BATH CITY GARAGE
26 PINE ST. PHONE IM
AUTO
LOANS
REFINANCING
We will make you a straight
cash loan on your automo
bile while you wait or
refinance your present con
tract.
Low Rates Courteoui
Service
Repair Bills—Private Sales
Financed
UNION
INVESTMENT CO.
—23rd Year—
-5 NORTH GRATIOT
MOUNT CLEMENS
Phone 2090
• hoVrs *
8 30 a. m. to 5:00 p. m.
SATURDAYS
8 30 a. m. to 4.00 p. m.
MONITOR-LEADER
Louis Lolhery
Passes Away
Romeo Mon Dies
in Hospital
ROMEO —Louis Lothery, 62,
died late Monday at a Pontiac
hospital.
The body was brought to the
Roth Home for Funerals where
funeral services will be held
Saturday afternoon at 2 p. m.
with burial in Romeo Cemetery.
Besides his wife, Bessie, he
leaves seven children, William,
Cecil, Louis, Jr., Marie, Mrs.
Mary Merriweather Mrs. Jessie
Merriweather and Mrs. Laura
Graves: seven brothers, William
and Henry, of Kentucky; Har
rison and John, of Ohio; Laur
en, Blair and Lee, of Romeo,
and a sister, Mrs. Marie Washen.
Shores Woman
is Dead at 54
Illness Fatal to
Mrs* Martha Kuschel
ST. CLAIR SHORES Mrs.
Martha Kuschel, 54, of 28029
Huges, died at noon Thursday ot
St. Joseph’s hospital following a
brief illness.
Mrs. Kuschel had been a resi
dent here for 12 years. She is
survived by two sons, William
and Charles Franz, and two
brothers, William Klavikofski,
of Roseville, and Anthony, of
Detroit.
Prayers will be read Monday
at 8:30 a. m. Monday at the Wel
kenbach Funeral Home, follow
ed at 9 by services at Sacred
Heart church, Roseville, with
burial in Sacred Heart Cemetery.
Selesmanship
in Reverse is
Mich.-BellTheme
Salesmanship in the reverse,
in an endeavor to save telephone
facilities to help the war effort,
is being practised by the Mich
igan Bell Telephono Company
today, according to R. F. Wins
low, manager for the company.
That is particularly true with
respect to the use of long dis
tance lines, he stated, inasmuch
as those circuits are congested
with military and war produc
tion calls. On all calls, both
local and long distance, tele-
phone users also are asked to be
brief. Inability of the company
to expand its system sufficiently
to care for the increasing busi
ness because of the scarcity of
materials more urgently needed
for war is given as the reason.
The lines to Washington are
more congested with calls than
any others in the country, the
telephone manager said, and
customers of the company are
being requested in newspaper
advertising and over the radio
not to call the Nation’s capital
at all unless the particular call
directly concerns the war effort.
Service users also are re
quested in the company’s adver
tising to restrict their long dis
tance calls to various other war
production localities into which
the lines are abnormally busy.
Those areas include all Pacific
coast points. Albany, N.Y.; At
lanta, Baltimore, Boston, Buf
falo, Columbus, O.; Dayton, In
dianapolis, Louisville, Minne
apolis, St. Paul. Muncie, Ind.;
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St.
Louis, Syracuse, and Warren, 0.,
in addition to Washington.
Sault Ste. Marie and Mt.
Clemens telephone users also
arc requested not to make any
but important local calls be
cause of congestion of the
switchboards.
LUMBER
3 YEARS TO PAY
NO MONEY DOWN
GARAGES
n> furnish labar and material* ar materials
only for . . . GARAGES. ALTERATIONS,
ADDITIONS. HRK K SIDING. PORCHES,
NEW ROOFS. RECREATION ROOMS . . .
FREE ESTIMATS. (hi «a flr»t.
Freth Car of
DOORS
Still Available—Genuine Temlock
INSULATION
FILMORE LUMBER CO.
24204 GRATIOT AT STEPHENS
Standardized Merchantmen
on Construction Program
' Germany Finds Itself Pinched for
Shipping Space After Long War
BY EDWIN SHANKE
LONDON, July 24 (IP)
Germany, pinched for shipping
space after almost three years
of war, has started a campaign
to salvage vessels sunk along
the European coast and is push
ing a program for construction
of standardized merchantmen
similar to the American “Lib
erty Ships”, British sources de
clared today.
The situation facing the Reich
is reflected in official British
reports that, of the 9,000,000
tons of merchant shipping with
which Germany and Italy start
ed the war, 5,250,000 tons had
been sent to the bottom prior
to last December.
How much tonnage the Axis
has lost since then is largely a
matter of speculation, but Al
lied communiques indicate that
it is considerable.
COMMERCE THROTTLED
While British and United
States navies have virtually
throttled Germany’s overseas
commerce, she is struggling tre
mendously to maintain vital
supply lines in European wa
ters particularly in the Bal
tic and the Mediterranean.
In the Baltic, German freight
ers are moving iron ore from
Lulea, Sweden, to North Ger
man ports and supplying Nazi
troops ir Russia and their Fin
nish allies.
With Soviet submarines on the
loose in the Baltic this is be
coming a hazardous job, and the
Germans are reported to have
resorted recently to convoying.
In the Mediterranean, Ger
many is largely dependent upon
Italian shipping space to keep
her armies in North Africa sup
plied, to maintain service to
Spain and unoccupied France
and bring oil in tankers from
Rumania. British warships and
RAF patrols have been taking
a heavy toll of shipping on these
routes.
MOVE ORE
In addition German ships con
stantly are shuttling along the
Norwegian and Netherlands
North Sea coasts and across the
Bay of Biscay, where they are
moving ore from northern Spain
to Bayonne and Bordeaux.
These ship movements are
subject to constant air attack
and the problem of unloading
vessels once they have safely
arrived in German ports is com
plicated by periodic bombings of
dock facilities at such import
ant centerir as Stettin, Luebeck,
Kiel, Hamburg and Bremen.
These bombing raids, coupled
with the Allied blockade, have
put an extra strain on Ger
many’s overloaded transporta
tion system, already taxed to
the limit.
SHIPPED BY TRAIN
Whereas before the war Ger
man tankers carried oil at low
cost through the Mediterranean
and up the Atlantic coast to
Hamburg and Bremen, most of
this fuel must be transported
now by train —and it takes 400
cars to move the equivalent of
one tanker cargo of oil ac-oss
Europe from Rumania. And the
cars have to go back empty.
Automatic
OIL HIATING CO.
SERVICE and
MAINTENANCE
on all types of
OIL BURNERS
48 CROCKER BLVD.
MOUNT CLEMENS
PHONE 1047-W
ImmSmT]
I IHCOWI I
Glased D. H. 24x24
FRAMES and % A 75
WINDOWS ...
BRIGHT STOCK €% A*
2x4—B't, each
K" x •”
SHIPLAP
Sq. Ft. .. Per M
20,000 Misc. Feet
PLYWOOD Qc
While it lasts, Per ft. O
The blockade also has forced
Germany to exert vast efforts
to attain a degree of self-suffi
ciency at great cost. For in
stance, British experts estimate,
Germany is obliged to keep 11,-
000.000 men employed in the
food industry alone men *he
Nazis can ill afford to spare
from their armed forces.
By contrast Britain, through
the aid afforded by overseas
supply convoys, has only 1,000 -
000 men tied up in agriculture
To help close the leaks in the
TVII7I7T TONITE AND SAT.
om Mil ft ML Mj Sat. Matinee Starts at 1:00
J in mm FJI The Screen's Strangest
A/ K - Cl/ UL L U Adventure Begins at Sundown
\
' rSfep
. WALTER RANGER’S
Great AdventurMMftf# of Today I
Hi*?* $23
- GENE TIERNEY
NICE tttlT ■ tniKUNMK * IAMT CHET * NSEPI CIUQI
KtHMII UMNO * tUI ESMMD * MMC UflOCt
mi SI CEOMC MINKU • I inn MTIMT PnMka
I
|
The Originator
of Low Prices in
Macomb County
lijMiiP
At S!4 Mile Road East Detroit Roseville 1000 • 1078
MOUNT CLEMENS, MICH,
blockade, the Allies have re
sorted to such steps as black
listing and preemption deals—
buying up strategic supplies
from neutrals whatever they
can. especially chrome, tungsten,
wool and rubber which might
reach the Axis.
Revenue Agents
Check Car Stamps
Agents for the Bureau of In
stopping automobiles on Ma
comb county highways today tcj
determine whether or not the
owners have purchased the $5
Federal use stamps.
Deputy Sheriff Steve Morris
accompanied the agents. Morris
was stopping the cars after
which the examination was
made.
QJs —
winter ZjoJ.au
Miss America 42
tUeacli
Girls of beauty and talent—
age 18 to 28. Mail or bring
this blank to park office
with picture.
Nome
Age
Addiejj
City
Phone
ROOFING \
PAINTS 1
HARDWARE /

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