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The daily monitor leader. [volume] (Mount Clemens, Mich.) 1942-19??, July 24, 1942, Image 7

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FRIDAY—JULY 24, 1942
Demand Laws to Curb Profiteering on War Contracts
Five Per Cent Taking
Advantage of Situation
Others Honest, but Report Suggests
Some Action to Limit Profits
BY ALEX H. SINGLETON
WASHINGTON, July 24— (A 3 )
—Laws to curb the profiteering
fringe of war contractors were
demanded today as the result of
s year-long investigation by the
House Naval committee.
In a summation of its in
quiry, the committee said that
95 per cent of contractors were
doing an honest job but “the
other five percent appear to be
taking advantage of the war
situation.”
For that group, the report sug
gested action to limit profits. It
added, how r ever, that “whether
this ideal should be achieved
through a direct limitation law,
excess profits taxes, or some
other means should be carefully
considered by the proper com
mitees of Congress. ’
The excessive profits of the
five percent group ranged as
high as 1.768.22 per cent on indi
vidual contracts. This was the
black spot in a report which
otherwise commended the Navy
for its “high degree of effi
ciency” and industry as a whole
for doing a “magnificent job.”
On the basis of its study of
39.405 naval contracts, with a
total value of $4,599,087,085, the
committee reported that profits
averaged 8.1 percent of cost, and
described that figure as “reason
able.” Largest profits in a spe
cific field showed up in engin
eering and architectural where a
survey of contracts of 66 firms
disclosed an average profit of
25.97 percent.
The committee said that many
of the contractors voluntarily
had reduced their profits when
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“the situation was called to their
attention.” It reported that it
had saved the government more
than $700,000 already “by sug
gesting and assisting in the vol
untary renegotiation of con
tracts,’’ and added that renegoti
ation ultimately would produce
savings amounting to “millions
of dollars.”
The committee made public
figures showing a 360 per cent
increase in ship construction
over a year ago, and develop
ment of an air arm which it
said would “provide the United
States with the strongest offen
sive force in naval history.”
It said naval vessels were be
ing launched far sooner than
was anticipated, and that the air
craft industry was “turning out
improved models of all types’ of
planes.
The committee said that 3,-
230 naval ships were building
as of June 30, 1942, as compared
with 697 a year ago.
Softball
Standings
BLUE DIVISION
Team W L Pet.
Bar 69 14 0 1.000
Sears* 11 3 .786
Spruce Inn 9 5 .643
Merchants 6 8 .429
Business Men ... 5 9 .357
Peschke • • 3 12 .200
Covered Wagon .2 13 .133
LAST NIGHT’S RESULT
Spruce Inn 9, C. W. 8.
RED DIVISION
Team W L Pet.
H & S 14 2 .875
Leander Case ... 10 6 .625
Eagles 8 6 .571
Hillcrest Studio . 8 6 .571
Nesbitts 5 9 .357
Owls Club 5 9 .357
Schwarzkoff .... 1 13 .071
LAST NIGHT S RESULT
Schwarzkoff 8, Nesbitt's 7.
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Team V L Pet.
A. & W 11 3 .786
Monitor-Leader .10 3 .786
L. & G . . 9 5 .643
•Kresgers . 5 9 .357
Gasow Boat 3 10 .231
Merchants 1 11 .154
FUMBLE LEAGUE
Team W L Pet.
Barney’s 5 2 .714
Optimists 3 2 .600
Rickard’s 1 5 .167
LAST NIGHT’S RESULT
Barney's 15. Rickard’s 4.
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Church & Church
INC.
Utica Romeo
new arrivals
Fashionable New 1942
WALLPAPERS
by
‘Fisher’ and ‘Style-Plus’
|p
Rotary Hears
Rev. Bentley
New Minister
Is Speaker
U T ICA Rev. Versile D.
Bentley, new’ pastor of Utica
Bcntly, new pastor of the Utica
Methodist church, was the guest
speaker at the Rotary club Tues
day evening. Rev. Bentley, a
Rotarian. was the recently elect
ed president of the Harbor
Beach club from which city he
came. He gave an interesting ac
count of the unusual and rare
experiences in his 18 years of
life as a minister.
Visitors at the meeting in
cluded Dr. Cahoe. of Highland
Park; G. D. Smith, of Mount
Clemens; Stuart Baker, of Bir
mingham.
Dr. L. R. Hirth, program
chairman for the coming year,
has announced the committees
as follows:
Classification and Member
ship: Sidney Odgers, chairman;
Leßoy Tyack.
Fellowship Committee:
George Epplcr, official host;
Bill Davis and Charles Moroske,
assistants.
Public Information: Henry
Gage, chairman; Charles Foster,
Matthew Rettmiller.
Community Service: Pr )•
grams, E. A. Schwarzkoff, Fath
er Edward DeKeyser, Dr. D. B.
Wiley, Carl Glady, E. W. Hahn,
Arthur Chapoton.
Youth service: Dr. A. F.
' r ws. Dr. Thos. Kerns.
International Service: Ray
Gilchrist, chairman; Howard
Cfissman, Victor Messmore,
Henry Scheper, John Andrus,
Ed. Havel, Percy Bunting. Wil
liam Kiekbusch, Omer Criss
man.
Aims and Objects: Clarence
H. Church, chairman; Dr. Lloyd
R. Hirth.
Ray Center
RAY CENTER—Lester Kirk
uri is getting along nicely from
his accident of four weeks ago,
and is very grateful for the
gifts, cards, books and calls
that he has received.
Mrs. Ida Milligan and Mr. and
Mrs. Floyd Kirkum visited
their sister, Mrs. William Bett
cher at New Baltimore Satur
day evening. Mrs. Bettcher has
been very ill the past week.
Lieut, and Mrs. Earl Watz and
eight weeks old son, Ward
Watz. of Little Rock, Ark., vis
ited relatives here last week.
Mrs. Watz was form er 1 y
Blanche Ward.
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Kirkum
entertained the Goodwin fam
ily of Detroit at a “chicken din
ner” Sunday in honor of Mrs.
Goodwin’s birthday.
Romould Bailor and Harold
Steinbrink visited relatives and
friends at New Baltimore on
Wednesday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. John Kossak
and son and Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Eettcher and daughter were
New Baltimore visitors on Sun
day.
Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Thomas
of Richmond called on Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Seafert Friday.
WASHINGTON—Mrs. Myrta
LaChance flew from Detroit to
Long Beach, Calif., via the
American Air Lines to visit her
nephew, Private Richard Gee,
who has completed 13 weeks of
training at Camp Roberts, Calif.,
and is now stationd at Los An
geles.
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Around the Town at Utica
UTICA—Work is being start
ed on the laying of sewers on
north Cass street from Ruby
street to the city limits
Mrs. Clyde Michael, of La
peer, accompanied by her son.
Walter Michael, of Utica, have
just returned from a three
weeks’ trip to San Diego, Calif ,
where they visited Frank Mich
ael. Frank enlisted in the Ma
rine Corps some months ago
and has been stationed at Linda
Vista, Calif. He is leaving for
an unknown port soon.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Blie
me’ster are leaving this week
on a two weeks’ vacation on
which they will visit Lewiston,
Mich., Mackinaw Island and
other points north.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Criss
rr.an and children are enjoying
a month's outing at a cottage
at Williams Lake. Miss Naomi
Gibbing was their guest over
Thursday.
Several events have been f. iv
en honoring Miss Helen Kidd,
who will become the bride of
Alger Chapoton Thursday, Aug.
6. On Friday evening Mrs
Frank Chapoton and Susan
Gage entertained at a miscel
laneous shower at the home of
Mrs. Chapoton and on Wednes
day evening Dorothy DeLee en
tertained at her home in Bir
mingham at a crystal shower.
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Remer
and Mr. and Mrs. A M. Koch
have been taking a few days
vacation visiting points in Ken
tucky and Tennessee.
Mr. and Mrs. Claude Louns
berry and Miss Roxanna Louns
berry visited Mrs. Lounsberry’s
brother, Frank LaDue, in Sagi
naw over the week-end.
Sidney Chapoton, of Utica, is
now in South Bend, Ind., w’here
he is working as mechanical en
gineer on a Studebaker con
struction job.
♦ In the librarians’ report given
at the meeting of the library
board at the Utica library Tues
day evening, it was revealed
thr.t circulation of books had
maintained a good average for
the past six months Naomi Gib
bing, librarian, submitted the
following: January 558, Feb
ruary 538, March 595, April
592, May 613, June 518.
Anew mystery story has been
added to the shelves “Chuckling
Fingers” by Mabel Seeley.
The surgical dressing unit of
the Utica Red Cross meet for a
pot-luck dinner on Thursday at
Trinity Parish hall. Mrs. Eari
Sipperley has called the meeting
choice home dressed
Beef and Pork
tt Lowest Possible Prices
• Home Mode Sausoge
• Hickory Smoked
Homs and Bacon
TENDER SMOKED HAMS
W* bay Livestock and Poultry
Utica Sanitary
Meat Market
Merkel and Neumaier
Main St.. Utica Phone 3851
MONITOR-LEADER
from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. but
workers may come at any time.
Fire of unknown origin des
\ oyed the Utica Heights Com
munity hall about 10 o’clock
Sunday night, with all the con
tents. The basement of the
building had been completed
and roofed over and all public
meetings w-ere held there, it
also being used as a voting cen
ter.
Included in the loss was dish
es. tables, benches, a piano,
radio and other furnishings. The
loss is partly covered by insur
ance.
Walter Flickinger of the
White Wing Poultry Farms is in
Grand Rapids this week attend
i a poultry congress.
Ow’ing to ill health. Jack
Lydia, who has conducted a bar
ber shop in the Schepcr build
ing on Cass street for the past
11 years, is selling the furnish
ings and will retire from busi
ness. He expects to visit in the
west.
GRUELLING MATCH
KALAMAZOO, Mich., July
24 i/P> Andy Paton of Ann
Arbor outlasted Bob Stowe of
Kalamazoo, 11-9, 7-9, 6-4, 6-3.
in a gruelling tennis match yes
terday to win the right to repre
sent Michigan in the National
Junior and Boys Championships
at Culver, Ind.
The match required three and
a half hours. Paton will repre
sent Michigan in the junior divi
sion along with Fred Kovaleski
of Hamtramck, who qualified
previously.
POOR PHILLIES
PHILADELPHIA. July 24—</P)
—A benefit wrestling show
drew 16,000 spectators into the
old Phillies ball park last night
and collected approximately
$25,000 for the Navy and Coast
Guard relief funds.
Six 'blocks away, in Shibe
Park, the Phils and St. Louis
Cardinals played a night game
before 3,881 customers.
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VjjC/ r y VSr c Irl rS \ 1 c„ -S
To all Telephone Users
T odiT th. telephone line, are crowded
with traffic as never before, and some calls
are certain to be delayed.
In the kind of war we ar4 fighting now,
telephone communication is a vital neces
sity. War call* mu*t go through. Every time
a military or war production call gets
stalled in a traffic jam, the speed of our
drive to Victory is slowed down.
The reserve capacity of our lines and
equipment, built up for emergencies, is
now fully used. And further substantial
enlargement of the telephone system to
take care of this wartime congestion is
impossible because materials are even more
urgently needed for tanks, planes and guns.
ong Dittance Call s
1. Make only the moat BMemry calif during the
buaineM day.
2. Avoid the ruth hours. When possible, call be
fore 9 A.M.; between noon and 2 P.M.; between
5 and 7 P.M. { or after 9 P.M.
S. Plan what you want to say, to that the eall will
he brief.
4. Whenever possible, give the number of the tele
phone you are calling.
I. Don't call Washington. D.C, unless you must.
Trunk lines to the nation's capital are already
overloaded with war messages.
Thoughtful use of telephone facilities in these days is a real contribution to the war
effort—one that every citizen can make. The Telephone Company will continue to
provide the best service possible under present conditions. But now, and for the due*
tion, WAR CALLS COME FIRST .
Michigan Bell Telephone Company
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.
New York . 63 2° 685 .. .
Boston .... 50 40 056 12
Cleveland . 52 42 .553 12
St. Louis ... 49 45 .521 15
Detroit 47 49 .490 18
Chicago ... 39 51* .433 23
Washington 36 "57 .387 274
Philadelphia 38 61 .384 28 4
•Games behind leader.
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 5. Detroit 3.
Cleveland 3. New York 2 (11
innings).
Boston 5, Chicago 4.
St. Louis 9, Philadelphia 6
FRIDAY’S GAMES
New York at Detroit.
Boston at St. Louis, twilight
(2).
Washington at Cleveland, twi
light (2).
Philadelphia al Chicago,
night.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Brooklyn . . 64 27 .703
St. Louis ~ 56 33 .629 7
New York . 48 43 .527 16
Cincinnati . 47 43 .522 16 4
Chicago ... 45 49 .479 20 4
Pittsburgh . 41 47 .466 21 4
Boston 38 57 .400 28
Philadelphia 25 65 .278 38 4
•Games behind leader.
THURSDAY S RESULTS
New York 6. Pittsburgh 4
Philadelphia 4, St. l.ouis 3.
Only games scheduled.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Chicago at Philadelphia,
night.
St. Louis at Boston.
Cincinnati at New York.
Pittsburgh at Brooklyn, twi
light.
Negroes constituted one-fifth
of the population of the United
States in 1790.
Harrison Township School Report
July 19. 1949
Meetn-g of the regular yearly session of Harrison Township School District No. 9
was inter hv President Mr. Lumby:
The of the previous year were read and approved as read.
The Treasurer’s report was read in detail and accepted as read.
Nomination of officers for the two expiring terms were open and Mr. Lumby
nominated by Mr. Stiles Mrs. Henschen was nominated by Mrs. Sawyer. There
being n > further nominees, the nominations were closed.'
Mr Lumby and Mrs Henschen being the only nominees for the two respec
tive offices open were declared unanimously elected to said offices.
Moved and supported that the school board salary remain the same for the
coming year Motion carried.
Moved and wpported that in the event of any additional tuition ta charged
against the children attending the M* Clemens High School from the rural dis
trict that >ime will he paid out the school board treasury, during the yeer
1942-1043 Carried.
Mr Sawver evp’amed to those who attended the meeting the progress being
made on the finishing of the 4th room and hall. Mr. Quackenbush narrated the
result' of acquiring additional ground surrounding the school. In case our school
'hnulri expand enough to require an addition. TTie school ground is being re
worked in preparation for landscaping
There being no further business to come before the annual meeting, it was
moved ’Mat we adjourn Submitted,
THEODORA HENSCHEN
Secretary.
\N M \l RETORT OF TREASURER OT M ItOOL DISTRICT NO. 8
HARRIbON TOWNSHIP
Receipts General Deb* Telat
Balance on hand General Fund June 30. 1941 % 1.043.90
Current 1941 Tax Receipts 6.302.17
Delinquent Tax Receipts 6 661 74
Primary money 2.243.23
Interest 704.86
Total General Fund Receipts $16.960 86
Balance on hand Debt Fund June 30. 1941 . $ 1.336 09
Current 1941 Tax Receipts 3.881 08
Delinquent Tax Receipts 3.177 18
Total Debt Fund Receipts $ 8.414.33
Grand Total of Receipts including balance or hand
June 99. 1991 . $23.374 99
Expenditures General Fend
General t mitrol
Salaries of Bourd $ 310 00
Supplies o( Board 14.73
Treasurer’s Bond . to.oo
Census Expense 31.2 j
Other Expense 51.00
Total General Control $ 624.00
Instruction
Teachers Salaries .... $ 4.614.05
Books, readers and desk copies 357.10
Miscellaneous Inst Expense £3.00
Total Instruction Expense $ 5.(.’36.15
Auxiliary and ( oordinate Activity's Expense
Transportation of Pupils $ 1432 82 . .
Other Aux. Expend 30.00
Total Auxiliary Expense 8 1.102 82
Operation of School Plant
Wages of Janitors $ 1.000 00
Fuel, janitor supplies, electricity, water 1.136.97 • •
Other expense 142.30
Total Operation Expense $ 2.279.47
Maintenance
Buildings A grounds $ 630.14
Miscellaneous 60 14
Total Maintenance Expense $ 690 29
Capital Outlay
New furniture $ 490 23
Total Capital Outlay Expense $ 490.23
Total General Fund Expenditures $10,239.91
Drbt Retirement Fund
Interest Paid on bonds 1,991.12
Interest certificates paid 2.049.99
Other disbursements 994.99
Total Debt Fund Expenditures 9 4.690J1
Grand Total of Expenditures 914.999J9
Balance on hand June 30. 1942 9 9.721.99 $ 1.793J9 910411.94
ROBERT SAWYER. Treasurer.
Harrison Township School District No. S
July ». M.-U
There is only one solution remaining—
more careful and more efficient use of prec
ent telephone facilities by all of us.
In the past, easy, unhampered telephone
service has been taken for granted, and
properly so. Now there is a war to win, and
each of us has a patriotic duty to see that
our use of the telephone does not interfere
with war calls. Though your own line may
never be used for war messages, every call
you make must pass through a central
office switchboard. Many switchboarda are
crowded with military or industrial calls.
You can help the cause of Victory by put
ting this list of reminders beside your tele
phone and making it your guides
Local Calle
1. Try to make your conversations short, and avoid
the rush hours.
2. Look up numbers in the telephone directory, so
that you won't have to call information.
3. Plan your conversations ahead, and hoop paper
and pencil handy,
4. Show your children how they can help the war
effort by keeping their calle brief.
5. If you share a party-line, be considerate of year
neighbors.
MOUNT CLEMENS, M4CR
7

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