OCR Interpretation


Farmers' champion. (Elgin, Okla.) 1912-1922, December 26, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96087587/1912-12-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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Succetftor to Indiahoma Chimpioii
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Vol. 3
ELGIN, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, lS12r
i. -
Sl ' ' "W
Far
namDi
aV A
... i i i i . L.n .i.
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D. E. McAnaw
umber "V
Compan
Dealers in . .
All Kinds of
Building Material
Grain, Cotton, Coal.
Best Mexico Coal
$7 a Ton
The Bank That Accommodates
Bank of Elgin
Deposits Guaranteed
If you are not already our customer, open an
account without delay.
A. L. McPhersoN, Pres. 0. A. McPherson, V. P.
E. McPherson, Cashier.
Diirta I Jci Blacksmiths, Horseshoers,
mCe MSI and Wagon Maker'
Taken From Their Annual Year Book, and
Published For the Benefit of Our Farmer
HORSESHOEING.
Plain Shoeing, No. o to 4. per set .".... .$1.75
Plain Shoeing, Nos. 5, 6, 7, per set ;',. 2.00
Toed and calkud, Nos. 0-4, per set 2.00
Toed and calked, Nos. 6, 7, 8, per set . . . . 2.50
Bar Shoes, each, plain 1.00
Bar Shoes, Toed and calked, each 1.25
Toe weight Shoes, per pair 1.00
Side weights, per pair 1.00
Running plates, plain or toed, per set 3.00
Hand turned shoes, per set $3.00 to $5.00
Rubber pads, per pair, Nos. 1-4 ..... 1.50
Rubber pads, per pair, Nos. 5-7 2.00
Shoes on pads, same price per set as plain shoes.
Leather pads and packing, each : 25
Resetting shoes, per set. .'.... 1.00
Resetting shoes, extra for calking, per set 25
Shoeing vicious horses $3:00 to 5.00
PLOW WORK.
New plow shear, 12 in. ,i.. .$ 3.75
New plow shear, 14 in . . . 4.20
New plow shear, 16 in 445
New lister shear, 14-in '. . . . . 3.15
New cultivator shovels, 5-in., per set of 4 (old
backs) ..' 'xj'-' 3-'5
New cultivator shovels, 3-in., per set of 6-'.(old
backs) $... 3-'5
New subspiler, regular pattern : . . . 1.00
New subsoiler;, John Deere' No. 1 ':.... 1.00
New subsoilef, John Deere Nos. 1-3 .') 1.25
New double standing cutter $1-50
New clamp for cutter .. ...... . .65
New land sideplate with bolts. . .-. : . . .,. V. 1 i .50
. , J?low hanitlcj.'.'straight .' . ' . jp '..90 s-
PlJw liandicsbuit.. .."?'. fT.. . ;'. . :.'JS!mitA-"r.ao:sT
New plow beam, l-horse :".". J.l 3.00
New plow beam, 2-horsc 3.50
Road plow beam . 4-Oo
Grader plow beam 5-
Pointing plows, small point 75
Pointing plows, large point, where plow is badly
worn I -oo
Pointing listers 1 -oo
Pointing cultivator shovels, 4 large to a set 2.00
Pointing cultivator shovels, 6 small to a set 2.50
1 .00
'JaV- : H"M
$
J. P. KENNEMUR
. . . For the Very ...
Bargains in
GROCERIES
AND FURNITURE
1MI
First Door West of
Post office
See Kennemur
Fin Kitchen Cabinet Given Away
I Elg'n
Olila
oraa
Pointing road plow
Sharpening plows, 12-in
Sharpening plows, 14-in
Sharpening plows, 16-in
Sharpening lister
Sharpening subsoiler
Sharpening cultivator shovels, 4 large to a set.
Sharpening cultivator shovels, 6 small to a set
Sharpening standing cutter
Sharpening disc, 12 to 16-in., each
Sharpening disc, 18 to 20-in., each
Sharpening plow disc, each
Sharpening rolling cutter
Sharpening harrow teeth, each
Sharpening cotton sweeps, 6-in., each
Sharpening cotton sweeps, 8-in., each
Sharpening cotton sweeps, 10-in., each
Sharpening cotton sweeps, 12-in., each
Sharpening cotton sweeps, 14-in., each
Sharpening cotton sweeps, extra large, each...
Weld patch on plow mouldboard, each 1.00
Weld piece on plow bar behind frogs each 1.25
Weld stub on plow axle, each
Sharp road grader shears cut in two
Sharp- road grader shears, whole blade in 1 piece. .
Straightening plow beam 5 to
New plow round, each. .
Welding piece on plow laudside, each
Welding pie-e on plow landsidc, road plows. . . . .
Sharpening stalk cutter blades, per ft., straight. ..
Shaipening stalk cutter blades, per ft., twisted.. ..
WAGON WORK.
ftew bolster, front, each $
New bolster,' hind, each
Bolster stakes, each. '
New axle, front, each ; ;
New axle, hind, each L-
New axle, laYger than 3 extra, according to size.
New sand board
v ir ii.. 1 ; n
iSl
t
ur
o
30
35
.40
15
.50
.60
25
35
.40
1.00
50
.02
.10
15
.20
25
30
.50
1. 00
3-5
4.00
1. 00
.20
75
1.25-
I2l2
IS
2.50
3.00
75
5.00
4.50
'300
TO CONSERVE SOIL MOISTURE
Nebraska Experiment Station Can
drrts Some Very Interesting and
Valuable Trial.
The Nebraska experiment static
has conducted some vory valuable ex
periment to dotermlus methods to
conaorvu aotl moisture. While thee
experiments had In view a lew rata
fall than that of Illinois, for oxaatpl,
the results nre nevertholnsa rateable
and suggestive to farmers la ItUcols
fanner territory. Nearly every year
'crops In' Illinois, etc., suffer la Jul,
mid August from lack of soil moisture.
Tue Nebraska station has reached th
following conclusions from Its at-
perlmonta:
1. That land which Is under thor
ough onltlvatlon abiorba wattr atuca'
more freely than land not under oultl
vatlon or which Is covered with grass)
or for any reason has a bard aur
facc. a. That land under thorough culti
vation loses but little wator from be
low tho first foot by surface evapora
tion so long as tho mulch is kept la
good condition.
3. That a growing crop uses water
from the land In proportion to U
growth of dry matter 'la the crop.
4. That land uude:- summer tills
or thorough cultivation from May 1 ta
Scptoinoor t on tho substation farst
has a5iniulnto(l from 6.D to T inches
morwator In the flxet sis feet of soil
than similar land growing a crop. Tb
wator so stored bns boon equal ts
(mm A( in R(l nnr nnnt. nf the rainfall
for the same porlod. Tho roolstur
content on summer tilled land In
creases below the six-foot area and
Is apparent to a depth of at leasH If
feet.
5. Tl.at vr-if stored In the wlv'
soli to n dy In vdt least sui feet U
...iini.i.. mvn mnHfi.A nf ftm nrnni
and Uia'aturo of y. 'e to draw tar
from '.Ards, nnnounj. s.
. 't Buccessoa ' of water la tbs)
substWi'uco and live t-otectlon to tho-'crop-
ejion with ex aadtaat asoU
ture ihWes. JhwAH.whilt. It rsaay
favor tieroTmediie growth, ef'tM
plant, does not protect It agatsMt pro
longed drought. The proteotioa of tfes)
crop agalnat drought la In alaioet exact
proportion to the total available aotl
wator within the reach of the crop. .
7. That grass crop (alfalfa aai
brome grass) dry the subaott to such
an extent on tho substation (ana that
n.- .! .nn fnltnwttur araaa la wkal-
V.I U.M W."J. w..w .- B Bp- -
ly dependent on the aaaoa'a ralaaitt
for 1U moisture supply.
I. That a rainfall of troas a Quar
ter to a half-inch mar have a decided
ly beneficial effect anon a growla
crop and U of great assistance ta -curing
a good stand at aaadtac ttsa.
Such a rainfall has little or bo aSaeC
In tncraaslna- the water la tae lower
nil hniow the mulch and la
evaporated by the sua and wlad.
J
auttrv In Trace.
Poultry, roosting la treas, la aot at
empt from Insect aasalaa. Tala haa'
been proved by the axparlaac ot
many who make a business of ralstatt
poultry. An examination of the llxaba
of trees where th young flocks roost
at night, before the birds hare a
yarded and houaed for th wiatar,"
will show countless numbers of mite
resting under the loos bark. Chlek
ens generally seek th nam roostla
place night after night, and carry In
sect with them. Th txa baeeasasj
Infested and th vermin lasreaa 1
numbers with wonderful rapidity:!
Anally sapping th vitality of ta.
blrda. Thn farmer woaor wbjj
food does not fattea, .Wha Mrda
are old nough to "climb trM tkar
should be placed la coops that aaav
b easily disinfected and kept la a
healthy condition, if th bat taaaeta
results are expected, luck Is th ad
vice of the poultryBM at ta liiaaa
sota University Farm.
Invention of th talad. v
Delicate cookery haa long been
known to flourish beat ia tboa laada
where roast beef la hard to get It
waa starvation that lav'entad th aal
ad, for example. Soaaakody had to
eat grass or go hungry, so he put vine
gar and oil. pepper and salt oh lt,
and lo! It made dry aread sees Ilk
a dinner. I do not douot that w shall
blesu tho meat trust for a varied
llotary ere we get through with It or
it with us, whichever way th thing,
comes out. Eugea Wead, la Hasp
ton's Usgaxln.
. .
And H a). , '
The devil can clt. Bariptara farasst
f
luonunuea on pue qj
V h
' purpot.--ehkr'
.j. .
tl
. I
V
'1

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