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The news=record. [volume] (Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon) 1907-1910, April 13, 1910, Wednesday Edition, Image 1

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THE NEWS
AIL THE OFFICIAL
NEWS OF WALLOWA
COUNTY IN THE N-R
ALL THE NEWS WHILE
11 IS NEW8 TWICE-A-WEEK
NEWS RECORD
ELEVENTH YEAR. NO. 100.
ENTERPRISE, WALLOWA COUNTY, OREGON, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 1910.
CITY OFFICIAL PAPER
TwiceaWeek
RECORD
FOR 8ALE.
Thos. Siegmund left on sale at, Ri
leyi & Riley's the Wonder Washer.
S ed Grain. Clean beardless barley
and oats. In the ' warehouse at Jo
seph. Address Jay Lewis, -Lostine,
Oregon. . 97r2
Seed Potatoes. Finest early vari
ety ever in, valley. 60 cents' per
cwt. at my ranch, 6. miles, southwest
of enterprise. Leave orders at R.
S. & Z. S. T. Daggett. 97b2
MONEY TO LOAN
Slate Funds loaned, 6 per cent. John
P. Rusk. Attx State Land E'd. Joseph
Farm loans at 7 Mi percent. Call' or
write First Bank of Joseph. . 68bt
WANTED.
Lumber. Anyone having lumber of
any grade in any amount for sale,
or who has timber he Intends to Baw
soon, and wishes to contract the lum
ber, call on or address W. F. Rankin
at Haney planer in Enterprise, Agent
for W. R. Klvette. 26b4
Housekeeper .wanted to keep house
for man with two children. Cali on
or write Ted Johnson, Enterprise,
Oregon. ' 97bln
: "Tost.
Black fielder's mtt, between Carter's
and .town. Please leave at this office.
New 8uits Filed.
April 8 W. L. Lay vs. G. H. Rus
sell. ',
April 11 Edna R. Shirk vs. H. K.
Shirk.
Marriage Licenses.
April 8. O. J. Wolfe, 29," farmer,
Wallowa; Jessie Wolfe, 21, Wallowa.
April 9. Steve D. Houok, 23, con
tractor; Joseph; Ethel H. Sheets, 18,
Joseph. j
BID3 WANTED.
Bids will be received for the con
struction of a two story and base
ment store building by the undersign
ed up to 1 o'clock p. m., Thursday,
April 21. Plans and specifications'
can be seeni at the store of the v
oersigneff in. Enierpn&ev or at office
l UO UVUILWL, . A, X41UOU, til rfw
seph. Bond of 30 per cent of cost
of building will be required of the
successful bidder. Right is reserved
to reject any and all bids.
'9b3 FRED B. ASHLEY.
AUCTION 8ALE OF, JERSEYS.
Sale of high-grade Jerseys at En
terprise, Saturday, April 16, begin
ning at 10:30 a. m. and continuing
all the afternoon.. Stock represent
ing both the Ladd and Looney herds
of Jerseys and from the beat dairy
herds of the Willamette Valley.
Don't overlook this opportunity to
improve your dairy herd from' the
best milking strains on the market.
We have 85 head of high grade eows,
calves and 2-year-olds; forty cow
now giving milk. We bought these
cows near Salem, the place where
more attention! is given to dairying
and .where the best breeding of Jer
seys is developed higher than tni any
other section of the state. Some of
these cows have records of 2 pounds
of butter fat per day. .Terms, cash
or bankable note at 6 months -time.
A. E. Tuilley and N. D. Varner, own
ers. H. . B. Davidhlear and T. Q.
Johnson, auctioneers.
Use Enterprise Flour, and patron
ize ,home industry. At' $5.00 per
barrel. It costs you leas and there
is none better. Every sack guar
anteed satisfactory or money back,
THE MARKETS
Portland. -.
Wheat Track prices Club, 96c;
Muestem, $1.01; red Russian, 95c.
Barley Feed and brewing, $27.
Oats No. 1 white, $29 per ton.
Hay Timothy, Willamette Valley,
$18020 per ton; Eastern Oregon,
$23; alfalfa, $17; clover, $16.
Butter Extra, 33c; fancy, 2830c;
ranch, 2022c.
i Eggs Ranch, candled, 2022c.
Hops 1909 crop, IB 18c; olds,
nominal. ',
Wooi Eastern Oregon, 1417c per
found. s
Mohair 26c.
' Seattle.
Wheat Bluestem, 98c;. club,
91 94c; red Russian, 91c .
0ts $2728 per ton. f
Barley $24 per ton.
Hay Timothy, $20023 per ton; al
falfa, $18 per ton.
Butter Washington Creamery, 35c;
ranch, 28c. , . .
Eggs Selected local, 26 27c.
Potatoes $12915 per ton.
PRESIDENT TAFT I
PLEADS FOR UNITY
NO DESIRE TO- READ INSUR
GENTS QUT OF PARTY.
URGES CONGRESS TO ACT
Must Redeem Party Pledges and
Party Members Must Be Known
By Their Deeds.
; WASHINGTON. D. C President
Taft was the first speaker on a long
list that addressed the dinner of the
League of Republican Clubs of the
District of Columbia Saturday night
Instead of delivering the keynote
speech, he pleaded in the national
legislature to rally behind Taft poli
cies . and redeem the platform
pledges of the party.
"Tonight," he slid, "we are wad
ing jobody out of the party. We
want all of them in the ranks - and
they have the opportunity to establish
their claim, to. Republicanism by that
Which they shall do in both houses
of congress by helping to enact the
legislation .. which is now before
them."
"The time has come," said Presi
dent Taft, "for doing and voting and
passing the measures which have
been placed before this congress.
It is time for doing things, and after
congress has adjourned the Repub
lican party will have formed Its lines
of attack. Then will it be furnished
with the weapons with which we are
going into the next contest
"Those," he continued, "In the
Senate and the House who stand tor
the legislation we seek in order to
redeem the pledges of the party have
the right to stand with the party as
Republicans. . . ,
. ''t they don't we won't quarrel
with them. They have a' right to
their Opinions. But, we desire their
aid as Republicans, and I don't wish
to assume that they are not as sin
cere as I hope I am myself in Re
publicanism. "The Republicanparty is not rigid
In its demands. .It is so broad and
liberal that it permits differences of
opinion." V
WICKERSHAM DEFENDS TAFT.
Defies Insurgents Says Time for
Vacillation Past.
. CHICAGO. Attorney-General Wlck
ersham read the insurgents out of the
Republican party in a speech before
the Hamilton Club at its Appomatox
day banquet
Every Republican might choose, the
Attorney-General dec'.ared, whether
or , not he was , wl'h the Republican
party and the President.
Time for Treason Patt
. "He that hath no stomach for the
fight, let-him depart,' quoted Mr.
Wickersham in a shout which em
phasized the sentiment. ."The time
f running 'with the hares and the
bounds ia over. Treason has ever
consisted in giving aid and comfort
to the enemy. If anyone wishes to
Join the Democratic party, let him do
so; but let him not claim to be a Re
nuhllcnn nnd work In. and out of sea
son to defeat Republican measures
and to subvert the Influence of the
.iepubiican President"
"Presidert Taft is doing exactly
what the Republican party and plat
form promised before his election,
and the new tariff laws fulfill the
pledges made in that particular," he
aid. , ' -
MAY REMOVE CARDINAL
ROME, April 12. Apparently the
only serious result of the unfortunate
failure of Pope Plus and Mr. Roose
velt to have the Interview both would
have enjoyed is ' the weapon .thus
placed in the hands of the opponents
of Cardinal Merry del Val, chief ad
viser of .tie Pontiff Jn secular cori
cerns. It is predicted that Cardinal
del Val s tenure of office will not be
prolonged indefinitely.
Town WIW Ovir Roosevelt
PORTO MAUR1ZIO, Italy, April 11.
The population of this pretty old
Italian town, nestling amid groves of
orange and olive trees, give Mr. and
Mrs. Roosevelt a ' truly remarkable
welcome' when they arrived from Ge
noa to spend several days visiting
Mrs. Roosevelt's sister. Miss Carew,'
who has a home here.
LORD KITCHENER
r- 1"
General Lord Kitchener, Britain's
great .soldier,, who Is visiting this.'
country, en route from India to Eng
land. Lord Kitchener will visit West
Point to study the organization andfl
administration of the famous military
ficademy. .
SETTLERS WARNED OF SUIT
SPOKANE, April 13. Sec'y.' of In
terior Balllnger has notified the local
land office' at Spokane to warn alt
settler on the Spokane Indian reseri
vatlon that the Northern Pacific
Railway intends . to bring suit to se
cure title to the odd-numbered sect
tions on that reservation. Warning
is to be given settlers locating on the"
odd sections and they are to be made
fully aware they are likely to be in
volved in a lawsuit with the railroad
company. .
Secretary Balllnger in a recent de
cision held the railway company was
not entitled to the odd sections on
the Spokane reservations, contending
the reservation was' established
about a month before the line of the
railroad was definitely located in that
vicinity. It Is from this decision the
railroad will appeal to the courts. ."
English Test Required.
VANCOUVER, Wash., April 12.
When soldiers are recruited for the
United States army In future they
will be required to pass tests in read
ing; writing and speaking -English, ac
cording to an order Just Issued by
ihe Secretary of War. Applicants
who, do not meet the tests will be
rejected.
. . ;
120,000 Socialists Meet.
BERLIN, April 10. At least 120,000
Socialists and radicals took part to
day in the most impressive demon
stration ever held In Berlin in favor
of suffrafe reform In Prussia.
8an Diego Feels Quake.
SAN DIEGO, Cal., April 10. At
11:57 P. M. a slight earthquake was
felt here. The shock was of about
ten seconds' duration.
SECOND TRIAL8 ORDERED.
Idaho Men's Cases Set for June 7,
Land Frauds Charged.
. BOISE. Although acquitted last
February at the conclusion of a sen
sational trial in the Federal court be
fore Judge Frank S. Dietrich on the
charge of conspiracy to defraud the
government of 15,000 acres of timber
along the Clearwater River in Nez
Perce County, William F. Kettenbach,
ex-president of the Lewiston National
Bank; , George H. Hester, ex-cashier
of that institution, and William
Dwyer, a timber cruiser, will be tried
on the same charge in the United
States Court here June 7.
March Is Record Month.
WASHINGTON. Total excavation
of the Panama Canal for the month
of March was 3,067,497 cubic yards
place measurement, against 2,602,995
yards in February.
BAKER CITY. One of the moat
difficult engineering feats of mining
in eastern Oregon has Just been com
pleted and water Is now ready to be
turned Into the penstock of the Gold
Coin mine, near Durkee, and the work
begun of washing away a mountain
of rich gravel.
Schmltx Pays Up Dues.
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., April 12.
Ex-Mayor Schmltx, who Is out on ball
pending an appeal on conviction for
graft extortion, has bees restored to
membership In the Musicians' Union,
having paid a considerable arrearage
of dues. It is posslb'.e the ex-mayor
will again take np his piofesslon as
a musician. ! '
A
T-ninfaiTu -ill -1111111 - Jill
TO
DEATH BY LETTER
MRS.
HENRY SCHULZ
FOUND.
BODY IS
LIES NEAR HOME OF SISTER
Charles J. Wezler, Her Son-ln-Law,
Thought to Be the Woman's
Assassin.
TACOMA, Wash., April 11. An un
known assassin, shortly before noon
Monday, April 4, waylaid Mrs. Henry
Schulz. A TROnmn unman onH eliM
i. her to death with a 9a raiikn
- " wu V. . . kll.l 1 c
volver, on the unfrequented Artondale
road, Gig Harbor. While her frail
body lay quivering, the fiend silenced
his victim with a club. Mrs. Schulz
had been decoyed to her death by a
fake letter that told of the serious
illness of her sister, Mrs. F. Habericht
of Gig Harbor. '
Until Sunday afternoon, when Sher
iff's officers and bloodhounds found
the partially decomposed body of Mrs.
Schulz where the assassin had drag
ged It, her fate was not known.
Strong circumstantial evidence Im
plicates Chas. J. Wezler, the dead
woman's son-in-law.
Willie Burrell, the 15-year-old boy
who delivered the message, says the
description of the man wno hired him
tallies exactly with the description
of Charles J. Wezler, as given to
Sheriff Morris, except that the man
wore silver-bowed spectacles.
Bold Leap Gains Liberty.
BOISE. Weeks of patient toll re
sulted in a daring Jail delivery at the
Idaho State Penitentiary, when
Thomas Harris, one of the most no
torious prisoners in the Institution,
'and John Cunnlnarham. ht nnllmntn.
(removed hundreds of brick from the
ventilator leading from their cell, and
cutting a hole through the roof.
While- Harris immediately made a
dangerous leap of 25 feet to the
ground and over the prison wall,
Cunningham - hesitated and was
promptly brought to a halt by the
shots of the guards.
Harris has so far not been cap
tured. He was surrounded by a posse
south of this city, but managed to
evade his pursuers.
MORE BATTLESHIPS FOR U.S.
WASHINGTON. By a decisive
vote of 162 to 110, 14 being present
and not voting, the House authorized
the .construction of two battleships to
cost $6,000,000 each. Thirty-three
Democrats voted for two battleships
and 24 Republicans against
This action was taken Just prior to
the passage of the naval appropriation
bill, carrying $128,037,602. m
Smugglers Move North to Operate.
LOS ANGELES, April 12. Driver
from Los Angeles by the Federal
sleuths aided by the local authorities,
the band of opium and Chinese smug
glers that has been operating along
the Pacific Coast and the Mexican
border has transferred Its scene of
operations to the northern ports In
Washington and Oregon, according to
Deputy United States Marshal Dur
lin. 8pokane Trains Collide.
SPOKANE. A misunderstanding of
block signals resulted In a head-on
oolllslon of passenger trains Nos. 2
and 3 on the Spokane, Portland &
SeatUe Railroad a mile west of Spo
kane Saturday night About 30 per
sons were Injured, and It Is expected
that several will die.
Antl-Polndtxter Plan Is Matured.
SFATTLR. The election' of , five
Supreme Court Judges In November
will be made the basis of an attempt
to force Representative Miles Poln
dexter. Insurgent candidate for the
Senate, to a declaration of principles,
through the medium of a convention
platform.
Woman Expoeea Steal.
INDIANAPOLIS, April 11. A sten-
! ographer, Mrs. Jeanette Stein, In the
office of the Eclipse Coal Company,
was responsible for the discovery of
a ' $17,000 coal graft In which the
CI ay pool and the English hotels, two
of the leading bostelries of this city,
and the City Hospital, were the vic
tim. . .
WOMAN
LURED
THOMAS F. WALSH
Thomas F. Walsh, the millionaire
mine-owner, who died In Washington,
D. C, last Saturday.. Death was due
to a growth In the lungs as the result
of ah Injury received years ago, when
Mr. Walsh was a miner In the West.
HAPPENINGS OF INTEREST
CONDENSED FOR READERS
.Governor Shafroth has been asked
to take a hand In the strike of the
United Mine Workers of district No.
15, by. sending troops to the scene
of the difficulty at Lafayette, Colo.
As further punishment to the late
Forester, the Postmaster-General has
directed that on July 1 the name of
the postofflce at Plnchot, Shoshone
County, Idaho, be changed to Avery.
Rumors that Joseph Smith, presi
dent and prophet of the Reorganized
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Salnti, will abdicate In favor of
his eon, Frederick M. Smith, are cur
rent .
A. C. Shaw, dismissed from the
Forestry Service on a charge of in
subordination in connection with the
Pinchot-Balllnger controversy, will
practice law In Portland, Ore.
Chief of Police Creecy was dis
missed from his position by the St
Louis Police Board. He was found
guilty of five of the eight charges on
which he was tried.
The Nebraska State Board of Pub
lic Lands and Buildings will buy a
moving picture machine for the
amusement of the Insane patients at
the Norfolk Asylum.
The Senate has agreed to take up
the Warren irrigation bill for final
consideration, and it la expected the
bill will be passed.- Only Senator
Heyburn and Senator Chamberlain
are known to oppose it
William Harris, alias Brown, no
torious as a bandit and accomplice of
Harry Tracy, the renowned Western
desperado, has been released to the
authorities of the Utah Penitentiary
by officials of the Federal prison, at
Leavenworth, Kan.
The hookworm, according to Dr.
Hollis B. Frlssell, of the Rockefeller
Sanitary Commission, who has com
pleted a tour of Southern states and
Is in Chicago, will soon be a thing of
the past
Henry S. Graves, Chief Forester,
left Washington April 14 for an ex
tended trip through the forest terri
tory; He will spend some days at
San 'Francisco, Ogden, Portland and
Missoula. -'
The monthly crop report of the De
partment of Agriculture Just made
public shows that on April 1 winter
wheat In the Pacific Northwest was
practically normal, and runs 15 per
cent above the general range for the
United States.
The river and harbor bill as re
ported to the Senate Monday carries
a total appropriation of $3,725,300 for
rivers and harbors of the Pacific
Northwest and authorizes contracts
to the extent of $2,290,000 additional,
making a grand total of $6,016,300.
As a result of water competition, It
Is stated, the transcontinental rail
roads have announced that the freight
rate on canned salmon In 60,000
pound shipments, will be reduced
from 85 cents per hundred pounds to
65 cents per hundred pounds be
tween Columbia River and Puget
Sound points and Chicago.
Scarcity of unskilled labor through
the United S ates has resolved Itself
into a problem so serious that rail
road builders and big contractors, es
pecially In the Middle West ars fao
Ing the necessity of throwing up
their contracts or securing an exten
sion of time In which to complete
tbislr work. . , .
OF
STATED IN BRIEF
TELEGRAPHIC CHRONICLE OF
8TATE HAPPENINGS.
SILETZ LAND SUIT IS FILED
Action of Assistant Secretary Illegal,
They Allege Balllnger's Time
as Counsel Cited.
PORTLAND. Declaring that Sec
retary or the Interior Balllnger, be
cause he had been 6ounsel for a num
ber of land claimants in the Slletx
Indian reservation, in Oregon, now
declines to give them the benefit of
his judgment since becoming Secre
tary of the Interior, and "has at
tempted to delegate' to his assistant,
Frank Pierce, the duty imposed by
law on him," and that the latter has
decided adversely to them, William D.
Bales, Thomas Holverton and Levy
M. Gilbert have filed suit In the Su
preme Court of the District, of Colum
bia for an injunction to prevent the
execution of the order of Mr. Pierce,
i Bales says he employed Mr. Ballln
ger In 1908; and that the latter filed
in the office of the then Secretary
of the Interior a brief urging that
patents be issued to Bales. By al-'
leged irregularities he claims his title
to the entry was clouded, and Mr.
Pierce has rendered against him a de
cision which is about to become op
erative In Oregon unless the court
prevents its execution.
- Bales and the other claimants de
clare the law allows an appeal to the
Secretary; that they are entitled to it,
and that the action of the Assistant
Secretary ia without warrant of law.
Williams County Next.
TlD ATM. fri... .A.IL. I.--.-., .
me mugene ana KOseDurg committees
appointed some time ago to oppose
the absorption of a portion of Doug
las County within the lines of the
proposed Nesmlth County creation,
and the fact that the people of Flor
ence, Lane County, also desire to ab
sorb the western portion of Douglas
known as Umpqua County,' has
aroused the pople of Drain Into an
attitude of defense on their own ac
count A large meeting of citizens
and business men held here resolved -to
outline still another county. The
committee also has decided upon the
uauie, vviuiams,. aner juage Wil
liams, who died on the morning of the
day the first meeting was held. It Is
intended to make Drain the county
seat If the county is authorized by a
vote of the people in November. ,
Banks Will Fight for Deposits. ..
SALEM. Proceedings in escheat
to recover accounts that have laid In
banks for more than seven years
without claimants are .to be started
against several Oregon banks imrae-'
dlately. ; Complaints are being drawn
up by Assistant Attorney-General I.
H. Van Winkle. That banks against
whom action Is being taken will re
sist vigorously Is to be expected, as
sums to be recovered vary in amount
from $300 to $5,000.
The law enabling the state to re
cover such funds was enacted by the
legislature in 1907 and amended so
as to make It more effective in 1909.
The money so recovered is to go into
the common school fund of the state
and the proceedings to be Instituted
y the state are similar to those
of ordinary escheat
Indian Girl Flies on Land.
LA GRANDE. A new precedent In
land office records here was set when
a half-breed Indian girl filed on a'
piece of land under the public domain
act The child Is now living on the
White Earth reservation in Minne
sota, and her right to file on an In
dian allotment has not been used be
cause the White Earth supply Is ex
hausted. It Is not believed here that
a similar filing has been made In
the history of the land office la this
state. The filing was granted.
Wilson Is 8eored.
CHICAGO, April 10. Characterizing
the teachings of Secretary Jas. Wilson
as "damnable, abominable and dis
graceful," Professor Cyril O. Hop
kins, of the Unlversltly of Illinois, de
livered a stinging criticism of the
Department of Agrlculturi bere in an
address at the City Clue.
NEWS
OREGON

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