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Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, October 10, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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University of Ore l.ijir-.jv
DAILY EDITION
auAmt paw, tosmmam coc m, oubqoh.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1918.
WHOLE NUMBER UKi.
01
Ctrl
n m of ns t co Ufa
350 AMERICAN
PLANES OROP
GERMAN 'A XTO.N MKNTM la MILKS
NORTH OF VPIIH X WERE Oil
JWT OF ATTACK
MIES LOSE ONLY ONE PLANE
Yank AvUtora Ifcwtroy Five Knrmjr
Airvlmr and One lUlluoa
Yesterday
With th Americans Northwest of
Verdun. Oct. 10. An American
bombing expedition, consisting of
orr 350 machlnei, dropped 32 torn
of explosives on German canton
ment 12 miles north of Verdun.
Twelve enemy machine! were des
troyed. One entente plane failed to
return.
The American planet destroyed or
Drought down (Ire Gorman machine!
and one balloon yesterday.
A British Port. Oct. 10. The
large Japanese steamship, lit m no
Hani, waa torpedoed and mink off
the Irish, coast. It la believed that
300 Uvea were lout. Many women
and children went down with the
ahlp, which Hank within seven min
utes after being struck. An Ameri
can destroyer picked up some of the
urvivors. The vessel was outward
bound for Japan.
With the French Army, Oct. 10.
The blows. which Murshul Foeh has
delivered in the Champagne sector
have nut only wrested from the Ger
mans moHt Important positions:
which they have held since 1914 at
an Inestimable sacrifice of men and
tnutorlal, but appear to have thrown
iiravoHt apprehension into the ranks
TONS OF BOMBS
a of the enemy. A German soldier
found In a ruined village surrender-1
ed, trembling with fear.
"What are you afraid of?" his cap
tor Inquired. "We are not going to
harm you."
With the acrid smoll of iblackened
masonry In his nostrils, with smoke
still rising from a village fired by
his companions In plain sight and
with puffs of blue smoke from Ger
man poisonous shells marking the
line of the Sulppe a little further
bank, the captive rejoined:
"iBut what will the French sol
diers do when they get Into Ger
many?" Amsterdam, Oct. 10. A revolt
has broken out In Bruges, Belgium,
the populace having arisen against
the attempts of the Germans to do
port Belgian civilians, according to
reports. The Germans used ma
chine guns and wounded numerous
Belgians.
PRICEFORCHROME
IS
rrico-FUlog ('ununittno la .New York
Gives Ittltf Price Their lm
slderaUoa Washington, Oct. 10. The urlc.e
of chrome ore over which there la
soma question, was substantially fix
ed at a meeting of the price-fixing
committee In New York several days
ago, and Information as to 'price
came from the Iron and Steel Trade
Press In a letter to Congressman Sin
nott under date of October 3. Huch
W. Sandford, chief of the chemical
division of the ferro alloys section
of the war Industrie board, substan
tially confirms the price statement as
to output and the price as follows:
"We are of the opinion that the
domestic cbromlte will be consumed
and purchased during the first half
of 1919 at a rate proportionate to
the 1918 production. It would be
Impossible to announce a price
schedule at this time for 1919, as
conditions are very uncertain. It Is
also hoped that the trade will take
off the market, during the remain
der of 1918, the or that Is offered
at the advertised price of the Cali
fornia Chrome company, and that
has prevailed during the summer of
1918. The buyers of chrome ore
re being asked to purchase freely
at this time, to consume the ore now
being offered, although It Is true
that 'he stock on hand are fairly
Urge. It Is doirbtles to be a Dart
of the program that the Imports will
he reduced to the lowest possible
amount during the next several
months, and restrictions as to the
use of chromlte will be removed. In
fact thoy have already been removed
so that the consumption of chromlte
will probably Increase. We believe
that the situation will straighten it
self out."
Copenhagen. Oct. 10. The
German relchstag has been
summoned to meet on October
12 according to the Berlin Tag-
eblatt.
Chancellor Maxlmilan's re-
cent speech and the political sit
uution will ! taken under dls-
cimslon.
APPOINTED TO OFFICE,
IS NOW A CANDIDATE
Conrad P. Olson, who was recent
ly appointed by Governor Wlthy-
cotoIk. to fill the vacancy caused by
the death of Justice Frank K. Moore.
has v announced his candidacy for
J election by the voters next month.
Justice Olson resides at Portland.
a-
CASUALTY LIST
The following casualties are re
ported by the commanding general of
the American expeditionary forces
for today:
Killed In action 80
Missing In action 105
Wounded severely .... 338
Died of wounds 13
Died of accident 14
Died of disease 30
Wounded, degree undetermined 4
Total R84
Wounded severelyHomer McGiv
en, Portland; Albert O. Anderson,
Knappa, Ore.
Marine Vrp
Killed In action 19
Wounded In action, severely 15
Died of disease .. 2
Died of wounds 4
In hands of enemy 2
Total . 42
ADJUSTED
250,000 HONS RETREAT
rrnnn ti ir-
rKUIvl IHh ALLIhlJ UKIVE
Eyacaatioi of Entire Uon
Le Cateau Americans, Britbk and French Adyance
15 Miles in 2 Days, HaYe Enemy at Their Mercy
Paris, Oct. 10. Vigorously press
ing their advantage gained by break
ing the German line between Cam
bra! and St. Quentln, the allies have
widened the great wedge to such an
extent that the entire Gorman, front
northward from Rhelms appears to
be collapsing.
The evacuation of the entire Laon
area will follow the taking of Le
Cateau, cutting the last lateral rail
road connecting the German north
ern front and the Laoa salient.
A quarter of a million Germans
are In full retreat. In some places
the allied advance has exceeded IS
mllea during the last two days.
Apparently the first step In the
great general retreat by the Germans
which seems inevitable, baa begun.
North of Cambrat the Canadians
attacked and penetrated deeply also.
The British marched through Ber-
try without opposition. They reach
ed the outskirts of Trolsvillers and
hold Maurols and Honnechy.
barge forces of the enemy have
been seen from the air fleeing well
to the east of l.e Cateau.
Ma ret x fell early and the British
reached Buslgny and passed quickly
mrougn Hohaln. These are bnly a
few of more than a score of towns
captured.
Many thousands of prisoners and
quantities of field and machine
guns were taken, as well as vast
stores of other booty, which the
enemy did not have time to blow up
or set afire.
London, Oct. 10. The attack by
the Anglo-Americans between St,
Quentln and Cambral last night re
sulted In continued advances.
The British are within two miles
of iLe Cateau and have captured Sal
llumlnes and Noyelles. The allies
have reached a point where It was
certain that the German lines could
be cracked with probably one hard
blow. The allies attacked again to
day, With the Americans Northwest of
Verdun. Oct. 10. General Persh
ing's Infantry went Into action today
on the Ml wing of the Argonne for
est. The enemy is trying to with
draw from the pocket.
I,omlon, Oct.
Cambral Is In
Field Marshal
10. The whole of
British possession,
Halg reported last
Stockholm, Oct. 10. There are
persistent rumors here that Emper
or Wilhelm has abdicated.
Paris, Oct. 1. The German min
ister of foreign affairs will appoint
a committee of officials, parliamen
tarians and Jurists to tram a German
plan for a league of nations, accord
ing to Basel reports.
London, Oct. 10. It is reported
from Vienna that the Austro-Wnn-garlnn
ministerial council has decid
ed to Introduce national autonomy
"In order to make President Wil
son's stipulation an accomplished
fact," says a Copenhagen dispatch.
PEACE TALK MA N SSUE
CENTRA
V, , .
Sector Will Follow Fall of
night from headquarters. The Can
adians were the first to enter the
town.
In the great defeat Inflicted on
the Germans yeaterday 10,000 pris
oner and from 100 to 200 guns were
captured.
The statement says:
"We Inflicted a heavy defeat on
the enemy Tuesday between St.
Quentln and Cambral, taking over
10,000 prisoners and between 100
and 200 guns.
"No lesa than 23 German divisions
were engaged on this front; they
were severely handled.
"The whole of Cambral la In our
possession. The Canadians entered
the town from the north at an early
hour Wednesday morning, while at
a later hour English troops of the
third army passed through the
northern portion of the town.
"Since August 21 the British first,
third and fourth armies have brok
en, through the whole elaborate
series of deep defensive zones built
up with successive belts of heavily
fortified trench lines. Including the
entire Hindenbnrg system on a front
of over 35 miles from St. Quentln to
Arras. Having penetrated this bat
tie area to a depth of between 30
and 40 miles, our troops are now
operating far beyond and east of the
Hlndenburg defenses.
"In the process of these operations
and since the date mentioned we
have Inflicted very heavy losses on
the enemy In killed and wounded
and have taken over 110,000 prls
oners and 1,200 guns.
"This feat of arms has been per
formed by British troops who had
already withstood the first heaviest
onslaught of the enemy's main forces
in the spring. Only the endurance
and determined spirit of these troops
permitted them to pass to the offen
sive with such conspicuous success.
By their heroic action in defense and
attack the men from all parts of the
British empire have proved them
selves soldiers of the highest order.
"The advance continues this after
noon, we have reached the general
line of Bohain, Busalgny, Can dry
ond Caurlor."
London, Oct. 10. Thev Serbians
are pursuing the defeated Austrtans
and have entered Leskovats, 22
miles south of Ntsh.
LrftlllTftft
I II liAlL I IV
P 1 1111 1" If
I I I II I I ill
I w I I LI IV
The Czech party did not participate
in the deliberations, but Is holding a
meeting today and starting a move
ment favoring a proclamation sep
arating Hungary and Austria, and
the movement is making rapid pro
gress among the people in the dual
monarchy, according to reports.
Basel, Switzerland, Oct. 10.
"Only military reasons could compel
us to accept President Wilson's con
ditions," says the Cologne Gazette.
The Gazette say it is possible that
Germany may require counter guar
antees, for example, the evacuation
of the colonies now occupied by the
allies.
GERMANY FEARS
F
E
-L
Great Excitement Pro all Over
Threat of Revenge When Potla
Reach Hon Territory
London, Oct. 10. There are Indi
cations that the' Germans are be
coming anxious as a consequence of
the threat of reprisals for the des
truction of town In France, afforded
by a telegram from the semi-official
Wolff Bureau received in Stockholm
saying that Douai was burning "as
a result of the continuous British
bombardment.'
MACKENSEX TO RESCUE
AUSTRO-GERMAN REMNANTS
Geneva, Oct. 10. A Vienna dis
patch received here says that Ger
man Field Marshal Mackensen has
arrived in Old Serbia, not to aid the
Bulgarian, bnt In order to save the
remnants of the Anstro-German
forces, which the allies are closely
following toward the Danube.
The 'Bulgarians refused to obey
the German officers.
The dispatch adds that the Aus-
trlans are evacuating (Belgrade and
that as the Serbians advance the
whole Serbian population I taking
it revenge. Even women with rifle
are driving out their former oppres
sor. The 'women have suffered so
much that It Is difficult to restrain
them.
BIG AIRPLANE CARRIES
PIANO OYER CHANNEL
Paris, Oct. 10. One of the new
allied bombing planea, In order to
demonstrate its carrying capacity,
has brought from London to Paris
a full-sized upright piano.
The machine landed In Paris safe
ly after ltB flight across the English
channel.
The airplane is capable of carry
Ing six persons and much bombing
explosives.
When this weight Is measured in
pounds, however, It is not readily
comprehended and it was'determin
ed to bring over a piano as clear
evidenoe of the machine's capacity.
FEAR MANY LOST ON
An Atlantic Port, Oct. 10. The
sinking by a submarine of a large
American steamship, with the prob
able loss of many of the crew, Is re
ported by a British freighter, which
has arrived with 20 of the survivors.
WIN WAR THEN TALK
ABOUT PEACE SAYS T. R.
Oyster Bay, N. Y., Oct. 10. Col
onel Theodore Roosevelt made the
following statement tonight on Pres
ident Wilson's response to the Ger
man peaoe proposal:
"Four days ago and again and
asaln prlor to that time' 1 881(1 that
thi8 war 8ht t0 be fought through
"nt" we secure tne unconditional
surrender of Germany and her vassal
allies Austria and Turkey. This
statement I unqualifiedly adhere. I
fear that President Wilson's latest
announcement will be treated as an
Invitation to further note-writing.
"The effort to fight and to nego
tiate at the same time Is apt to dim-
age the fighting end ot the combina
tion. I believe that our sole aim
should be to win the war and not to
discuss peaoe terms with the enemy
until the war has been won."
Paris, Oct. 10. "The note could
not be improved upon; substitute
Paris for Washington and the date
line might have been dictated here,"
is an epitome of French opinion as
indicated by. the popular reception of
President Wilson's document-
RENCH
REVEMG
TURKEY IS IN
DESPERATE
ST!
CRISIS NOW DUE AT CONST AN-
TINOPLB AND GOVERNMENT
ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE
PRO-GERMANS ARE L0SEN8 OUT
View la Held io Washington That
worn Empire I Ready for
Unconditional Surrender
Washington, Oct. 10. The non
appearance of a Turkish peace note
and report of Impending far 'reach
ing event in Constantinople ha
strengthened the view hero that th
situation in Turkey Is desperate.
It Is believed that the pro-Gennaa
government faces utter collaDse. and
that the Turkish government will
make a direct appeal for peaoa at
any price.
The state department has heard
that representatives of the various,
factions in Turkey have already ap
pealed to officials of the allies ; at
SaaonlkL. promising tr accept- - -Biconditional
terms.' -.r 7 , ' .7 .
BY AN AUTOMOBILE
Ashland, Oct. 10. In recording
a fatality due to an automobile acci
dent, the long-expected has happen
ed on local streets. Miss Marv Kir
sebbaum was the victim and the tra
gedy occurred on Tuesday afternoon
about 3 o'clock, near the First Na
tional bank corner. Bert Hawkes
was the driver of the car which was
in the Jitney service. He waa aolnst
east and Mips Kirecbbaum was cros
sing tne street at that point. She
was seen to hesitate after lea vine
the curb. Hawkes also slowed his
car, taking it for granted shp would
wait until he passed. With an evi
dently mistaken idea on the part of
both, Miss Klrschbaum attempted to
hurry across, was struck by the car
and dragged some distance, beinz
fatally injured. She was taken Into
Foley's drug store. and lived about
half an hour after the accident. Con
cussion of the brain and internal in
juries are attributed as the cause of
death.
Miss Klrschbaum was 69 years ot
age, and had resided in Ashland tor
over ten years. She had lately rent
ed the family residence on Nob Hill
and removed to Iowa street. She was
a sister of iHenry C. Klrschbaum who
died In this city in 1913. Her only
known relative In this state Is Ed
ward Spath, of Gresham, in Multno
mah county, who is a nephew.
Bert Hawkes, driver of the car. U
the son of S. A. Hawkes, the family
home being In Ashland. He state
that he has driven a car about six
months. The coroner's inquest will
be held today.
THE TURKS EVACUATE
F
London, Oct. 10. French and
British warships which entered Bet
rut, the chief seaport of Syria, Sun
day, 'discovered that the town had
been evacuated by the Turks. British
and Indian Infantry have occupied
the town.

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