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Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, October 11, 1918, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96088180/1918-10-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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University of Ore. Library j
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DAILY EDITION
QUAirn PAaa, JOgCTKETB OOP WTT. ORBOOW. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 10)8,
M-HOM5 1TVMBER 24M.
HIS B n
J . t ir .v. ' 1 - -1 - .
II
MENANDMONEY
TO BE HUM
AT PRUSSIANS
UKNHIIAI, MAIM 'II HAYti A.MK1U
VAX TIUMM'M NOW AliltOAIt
KXCKKII l.tMKI.OOO MAItK
INFLUENZA 1ST
V,
BE RECKONED
IITH
OF
Mltlit HUlUiu A.kwt .Nint4y-firt Iri
vlalim, Iim-IuiIIimc Orfgim TriMw,
HUH In the Training Area
Washington, Oct. II. The Amor
lan troops overseas have passed the
1,1)00,00(1 mark. Ueueral March an
nounced' today. The general declar
ed that men and money must be
burled at th illun to. make victory
oertain. He urged the loyal sup
port of the Liberty loan and stated
that the war department won prepar
ing another 2,000,000 men to follow
the flrat two million, and has asked
congress tor IS, 000,000,000 to carry
out the war proicrani.
Genu. March Hinted that the Slat
dlvlnlon, Including the Oregon tropa,
la atlll In the training area.
MKIXMOURArtlfi RUUISTKR
A HKVKHK HIIOCK
Washington, Oct. 1 1. Selzmogra-
pha all over the country have regl
tored a aim-re eurthquuke this morn
ing. It Is unknown where It la cent
ered, hut It Is btilleved to lie In Cen
tral America.
KirpcUuK .Moving -ure ltulne
AMH of tlu l)lMe In Itnllirved
Afliout Iteai lied
Washington, Oct. 1 1. Influenza
and pneumonia In the army camps
has made the death rate the past
week Increase from 32 to 81 per
thousand. The peak of the epidemic
ahould be reached shortly. It Is be
lieved that the strenuous work at
the ramps has been discontinued.
New York, Oct. II. As aid to the
fight against Influenxa, the manu
facturing and distributee agencies
have decided not to reulese any new
moving picture reels to exhibitors
from October 13 to November 9.
WOl'MtKII MAIUNK KltOM
KRAXtH liol.Dll1 vi(T(M
New York. Oct. 11. Hold-uu men.
In pursuing their trade, selected as
their victim In a New York street
one of Pershing's wounded Marines.
Sergeant William Koger. who unable
to put up a fair fight because of a
shattered arm and a wounded aide.
Was robbed of 1700 worth of Liberty
bonds and $200 In cash.
MEDFORD HAVING HARD
PROMISING SEASON FOR
THE LONE STAR MINE
TIME RAISING QUOTA
The crisis In the Medford dtotrlrt
Liberty loan campaign Is fast ap
proaching, says the Medford Tribune.
Subscriptions aie still coming in ex
asperatlngly slow. Only $3,000 was
subscribed yesterday. The total this
morning was only $235,000. which Is
$63,000 short of the quota.
FORCED
TO
RETREAT
45
MILES SINCE LAST JULY
('""Ir-wlfl;' M
At Present Speed of Allied Dri?e Enemy Will Soon be
Beaten from trench and Belgian Soil-Americans
Finish Clearing Argonne Forest of Huns
9
Paris, Oct. 11. The grin of the
Germans on northern France has
been loosened and the process of
herding them back to their borders
is proceeding at an Increasing rapid
pace under the allied lash.
Since the beginning of July the of
fensive of the allies has pushed the
enemy back to a maximum of 45
miles from the Ancre, near Albert,
to Le Cateau. Twenty-five miles
more will bring them on this line
to the Belgian frontier south of Mau-
beuge. But long before then If the
pressure on all sides Is continued as
at the present rate the enemy will
be cleared from virtually all of
French territory and Belgian soil.
i ne uermana are carrying out
their general retreat under Dreasue
and although Skillfully rnnHnH I.
likely to cost them heavily In men
and matelal.
Ixndon. Oct. 11. Today's advices
would Indicate that It Is certain that
the Germans must evacuate St. Go
baln forest almost Immediately. The
enemy Is evacuating the Chemln-Des-Dames
under pressure. The llnea
have been turned between the rivers
Berre and Solssons, making the Ger
man situation at Laon almost diffi
cult.
In the Champagne the French and
Americans are Joining hands north
Manager G. II. McKlroy with Mrs.
McKlroy. and Bee. Mrs. a. J. Ilix of
the Ione Star mine, operating near
Hogue nivor, arrived this morning
to apond the day in thia city. They
were accompanied by Mr. MeElroy's
brother. W. H. McElroy of
Salem, who has recently ac
quired an Intereat In the property.
It la.announced that plans are being
mirile to run the mine by hydraulic
pressure as soon as the season opens
I.' """." ."". . r Amsterdam. Oct. 11. -Karl Hans
K"iti mivuig piani is contemplated in I , ... ...
u- . i .. .,. iimiiiwr ui i ne reirnsiag, lias ueen
the near future. Manager McElroy I.,. . . "
CnnRen tn Jlltnpaerl th pni-nrnni. if
slates that the season looks very ,. , , ' ,
; Auiarc-irrauie, wno is expected 10
The committee announced this of ,ne Argonne forest In the Grand
noon that unlesi a vigorous crusade Pr9 S'P nd have occupied the
is quickly begun to persuade those
persons who have already subscribed
to greatly Increase their aubscrlo
tlons, and to obtain many new sub
scribers the Medford district will
fall utterly to reach Its quota and ao
down In history as a slacker commu
nity.
NEW GOVERNOR FOR
ALSACE-LORRAINE
Grand Pre station while patrols have
entered the town itself.
On the Meuse, northwest of Ver
dun, the Americans have cleared
out the little pocket In the direction
of Slvry. which held their advance
up for a long time.
Paris, Oct. 11. The cleanlnr n
or me Argonne forest has been com
pleted by the Americans. No Ger
mans now remain In that great
wooded area.
Paris. Oct. 11. The British have
captured St. Hlllalre. Lea Cambral
Avesnes and Staubert, and took many
prisoners.
The French have taken Bertlcourt.
north of Rhelms.
On the British Front in France
Oct. 11. Monslgnor Chollet, the
archbishop of Cambral, waa carried
tws by the Germane when thev
evacuated that city.
fans, Oct. 11. The French to
day advanced north of the Aisne and
captured the towns of Chivy and Mo-
ullns.
London, Oct. 11. The Serbians
after capturing ILehkovabe, advanc
ed 10 miles north. Over 3.000 oris
oners and five guns were taken In
the advance.
gkhman captain
COXGK.VN IiATK FRENCH
promising. So far the values have:
toeon running about $1 a yard.
600 BELIEVED LOST
ON THE LEINSTER
Dublin, Oct. 11. It Is believed
that 600 lives were lost In tho sink
ing of the mall steamer LeltiBter, by
a torpedo in tho Irish sea yesterday.
Only about 150 were saved. It Is
but loved thnt there were no Ameri
cana on board.
!E
BY
Washington, Oct. 11 The present
maximum price on Douglas fir tim
ber will remain effective "until Jan
uary 15, under the agreement reach
ed today between the west coast lum
ber manufacturers and the war In
dustries board.
retire momentarily.
"I'N-KUITRKD" YANK8
ItHKl'HK TO St'KUKNDKK
With Gouraud's Army In France.
Oct. 11. .No higher tribute could he
paid to the fighting qualities of the
French army than the speech of a
dying Prussian captain, who asked
his captors If he might be allowed to
speak to one of their officers. A
lieutenant, belonging to a famous
colonial division came up and the
wounded man, propping himself
painfully on his elbow, gasped in
good French: "I know we are ene
mies, but as a professional soldier.
I want to tell you I have never seen
anything finer than the conduct of
your men. Unfortunately for us you
will be in Germany before Christ
mas; but Just the same, I want to
congratulate you. Will you shake
hands with me before I die?"
RENE FONCK DESTROYS
109 GERMAN MACHINES
Paris, Oct. 11. Lieutenant Rene
Fonck has brought down four Ger
man airplanes within 20 minutes on
the same day. Fonck now is credit-
d with 70 official victories and has
actually brought down 109 German
machines.
KRIEMHILDE LINE SMASHED BY YANKS
IN r.lARCH NORTHWARD TO
BELGIUM
With the American Forces N'orth
woiit of Verdun, Wednesday, Oct. 9.
The brightest spot In the heroic
and amazing story of the now famous
"lost battalion" which belonged to
the 77th division was the climax to
the fourth day of the troops' beleag-
tierement In the Argonne forest.
When the men were lonir foodless
and almost wholly without ammuni
tion and when many were' weak from
exhaustion, but not despairing, an
American who had been taken nrls-
tnnm 1. . . , U . . J 1 ...
" 11 ' i uy I II U MVl 1IIUUB H 11 U 11 I'll 1) ap- " " nut, wtu a
peared at the little comp surrounded w,,eu uul ojr 1,18 Jn"n or Frencn iacK. ions or explosives were drop-
Im ti. ..itn.. and Americana at. 'T.nnrnn Thn Am. ned nn Mdilnroa VtMtaM nn
in uiu vaucy.
The man had been sent bllndfold-
With the American First Army, preparation, but thn ...rnri .tt.v
Oct. 11. Americans are through the enabled the infant .1.-
Krlemhlld line-on a front of slx'iines within a few hours and hold
kilometers (nearly four miles). ,them.
They have smashed the last or-1 The Austrlans were anxious to
ganlred German dofenses In this re- surrender. One captain was found
glon wfat of the Meuse and are ad- waittnir on thn tm nlf nf n fa 1 lan
vancing northward with only na- tree.
tural defenses between them and the j AH the principal centers behind
Belgian frontier. the German lines were bombed ex-
The Argonne Pocket has been tenslvelv In connection with thn at
U-BOAT TURNS JTS
GUNS Oil YANKS
8lir(mei Kill gcores of Those on
Doomed Ship life BoaU Are
Riddled With Bolleu
An Atlantic Port, Oct. 11. Scores
of American soldiers were killed or
wounded by shrapnel fired by a Ger
man submarine after It had torna-
doed the ateamshln Tirnn.)...
1,700 miles off the Atlantic roast.'
according to the story told bv 20
survivors who arrived "here today
aboard a British frelrhtor
There were 250 men aboard th
Ticondeoga. an American steamship
of 5,130 tons, and all but the 20
who arrived today are believed to
have perished.
The survivors got awav In the
only boat which waa not demolished
by the snellflre from the submarine,
they aatd. Seventeen of the men
who reached port were members of
a detachment of soldier detailed to
care for horses which were being
transported.
The Ticonderoga waa attacked.
presumably on October 2. when she
fell behind her convoy because of
the engine trouble.
BRITISH MAKE
JIFT DRIVE 1
TO IE CATEAU
"v' f:'.'7-rj'
HAIO SWINGS HIS LINE 12 MILES
ONWARD WHILE BOCHE CON
TINI E8 TO GIVE GROUND
ABDICATION OP KAISER '
' RUMORS ARE PERSISTENT
Stockholm, Oct. 11. Rumors of
the kaiser's abdication, . or. serioua
Illness, were first current 1n Europe
several days ao. In connection with
tnia, it is noted that reporta of over
throw of the Hohenzollerns were ex
pected to be circulated at the same
time the German peace offensive was
launched.
Recently the kaiser was reported
so 111 that he was forced to cancel
all engagements. A few days later
word was received that he had been
at Mannhtm to make an address and
was forced to flee an air raid, hid
ing in a cellar.
mi help in rams w
German Machine Giua Seeta Offer
Stiff Resistance But Can't With,
stand Hammer Blows of Allies
FOR MAUBEU6E FORTRESS
ed from the German headquarters
with a typewritten note to Major
Whittlesey, reading:
Americans, you are surrounded
on all sides. Surrender In the name
of humanity. You will be well
treated."
"Go to hell," he almost shouted.
Then he read the note to those
around hlmVnd his men cheered so
loudly that the Germans heard them
from their observation posts.
and Americans at Lancon. The Am- pod on Msleres, Vouzlers and points
erlcans are moving up through the along the Meuse.
forest with the englrfeers blazing the! Eighty-five allied planes crossed
way through the woods and tangled the enemy lines during a period of
masses of wire. iegs than an hour. 1
East ot the Meuse boche counter Lieutenant Erwln and Esterbrook
attacks were repulsed and the brought down two boche machines
French and Americans consolidated land forced unnthAi-
their newly won positions. ., Wmi.
1 mivuvovj 1 vuuiuiauunr vi
The attack west of the Meuse was the battalion which wan rescued af
a complete aurprlse to the Austrlans ter helnr tV.nn.uf in h. a.-..
1 o tifvia a mv niauiiun
In that section. It would have taken fnreat fnr r. ..
four or five days to amash the wires' regiment yesterday, saying he need
and reduce the defenses by artillery led no rest..
New York. Oct. 11. Von Hlnden-
burg is now entering the last lap -of
hia retreat to the great French fort
ress of Maubeuge, guarding the Bel
gian border.
The Belgian boundary soon will be
occupied by the German army aa its
main defensive position and north
ern France will be redeemeo. The
Americans and British are advancing
so quickly along the main railway
leading to Maubeuge that it is doubt
ful whether von Hlndenburg can
make a prolonged resistance any
where until he gets back to the fort
ress. The fact that the Americans
are making such rapid gains shows
that von Hlndenburg Is anxious to
reach the Belgian border as soon as
possible.
If the British and Americans suc
ceed in driving the Germans from
Maubeuge, the line of retreat would
be along the Sabre river, which joins
the Meuse at Namur. Namur, in Its
turn, is the southern, key to Liege
and guards the military passageway
from Belgium Into Germany.
The Anglo-American wedge, there
fore which is now .moving relentless
ly upon Le Cateau, has but to con
tinue its present northeasterly di
rection In a straight line to reach
Liege. This is the ultimate objective
of the movement. It has a relation
ship with the American operations
northeast of Verdun, which are mov
ing down the .Meuse to close the
Luxemburg exit out of France. If
the Americans from Verdun follow
the Meuse along Its course and the
Americans In Plcardy continue the
present direction of their advance
past Maubeuge, the two armies will
join forces at Namur.
London, Oct. 11. The men of the
once formidable . German
holding the Hlndenburg line from
north of Cambral to St. Quentin are
facing eastward, defeated and in r
treat Their backs are the targets
for the British, American and French
troops, who bitterly fought them.
step by step, out ot supposedly Im
pregnable defeases, and now are
harrying them across the open coun
try toward the German border. No-
where Is the enemy attempting a
stand In force.
True, the German border Is ret a
long distance away, but the past two
days ot chase have materially de
creased tne width of the area seDr-
ating the Invaders from their own"
Rhine line.
Le Chateau, the important junc
tion point Vi miles southeast ot
Cambral, represented Thursday
night the point of deepest penetra
tion by the allied troops. The Brit
ish were the masters of It. All alone
the front, however, the British, Am
erican and jrench have been stead
ily pressing forward their infantry
forces, taking numerous towns and
villages, while far in advance of them
the hoof beau ot the cavalry horses
intermingle with the roars of the
whippet tanka and the staccato nark
ing ot machine guns Inside the mov
ing forts.
So fast fias been the retreat of
the enemy that at various points the
allied fore afoot lost contact with
them. The retreat, which is over a
front ot about 55 miles from the
south of Doual to the region east ot
St. Quentin, has left In Ue hands
of the allies, in addition to the towns
taken, valuable lines of communica
tion and strategic position of hih
importance and driven in a wedge
that seemingly will force the Ger
mans to fall back every where from
the North Seat to the vicinity of
Verdun.
Southeast of Douai, one of the re
maining strong points In the flnr.
man line in the north, the British r.
standing in Etrun, 12 miles south
west or Valenciennes, the pivotal
point in the enemy's known next Aa.
fense line, and 10 miles to the south
the city Is outflanked at Solesmes.
Both In the Macedonian theater
and In Palestine the allied torces are
pressing the enemy hard. Albania
Is fast being cleared of the Austro-
Hungarlan troops, while In Serbia
the enemy lg nearlng Nlsh, harassed
by the Serbians. At last accounts
(Continued on page 4)
KAISER SIMONS ALL
SOVEREIGNS TO ME
Amsterdam, Oct. 1 1. Emperor
Wilhelm haa summoned the sov
ereigns of all the German federal
states to Berlin for a consultation
before answering President Wilson's
note, .according to a Cologne dis
patch. Such a conference Is uniaua
in the history of Germany.

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